Participants wanted- helmet study short online survey



Jack Hardwicke

New Member
Apr 21, 2021
1
0
1
25
Hi all, I’m part of a research project looking into competitive cyclists’ perceptions of helmet use and we are looking for participants. It is a short online survey (5 mins max) for any age (18+), ability, discipline and genders. Please click on the link below to complete the survey, thank you!

https://forms.office.com/r/3iPkTkYFHN(link is external)

If you want to find out more about the research, feel free to email me [email protected]
 

dabac

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2003
2,294
284
63
52
Hi all, I’m part of a research project looking into competitive cyclists’ perceptions of helmet use and we are looking for participants. It is a short online survey (5 mins max) for any age (18+), ability, discipline and genders. Please click on the link below to complete the survey, thank you!

https://forms.office.com/r/3iPkTkYFHN(link is external)

If you want to find out more about the research, feel free to email me [email protected]
I found the question about facial injury somewhat silly. It isn’t an either-or thing. Of course even a regular helmet offers SOME protection against facial injuries. Temples, brows, cheek bones receive some protection. Chin, nose, lower jaw - not so much.
Likewise the ones about helmet replacement. I do a fair amount of utility riding. Helmets in regular use picks up scuffs and dimple-sized indentations VERY soon. I’d have to subscribe to them if those were valid causes for replacement.
Replacing a cracked helmet - certainly. Replacing an intact helmet after a known hard hit - sure. Replacing a helmet only b/c it was worn during a tumble with no known significant head impact - I don’t think so.
 

cyclintom

Well-Known Member
Jan 15, 2011
1,274
194
48
It is normal for you in a fast collision to turn your head away. In case of a crash in which you're thrown up in the air, it is normal for you to rotate your body in the air to attempt to land over the largest possible surface area to reduce the lbs per sq inch. https://www.cyclehelmets.org/1012.html Believe me when I say that I have crashed a hell of a lot. I used to take a LOT of chances and that didn't turn out well. Helmets are good for one thing - protecting your head in the most common bicycle accident - the slow or stopped "fallover". If you are hit by a car you are usually a fatality. I don't think that we need to go into the reasons why helmets are not very helpful but I will offer this: Trek actually studied the problem with helmets and why they do little to no good and they developed a helmet that they call "Q-cell" (or possibly something more safesworthy now) This is sold under the Bontrager trade name and they actually seem to help MUCH better than normal foam helmets. I wear one and have had several crashes wearing it and could actually tell the difference. I recommend them.
 

Similar threads