Patch and patch again

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Roy Zipris, Mar 2, 2003.

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  1. Roy Zipris

    Roy Zipris Guest

    I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the glue
    dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again? I guess I have to remove the
    glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what? Thanks. Roy Zipris
     
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  2. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Roy Zipris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the glue
    > dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again? I guess I have to remove the
    > glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what? Thanks. Roy Zipris

    Sure fire tube patching 101.

    1. Rough up area over hole.
    2. Clean with alcohol to remove any oils. (Hypodermic prep swabs work great for this)
    3. Apply vulcanizing glue to area greater than patch.
    4. Allow to completely dry for 5 mins. (most important step)
    5. Apply patch and press firmly in to glue.

    Never had a patch fail.

    Mike
     
  3. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Michael Dart wrote:
    > "Roy Zipris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the
    >> glue dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again? I guess I have to
    >> remove the glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what? Thanks. Roy Zipris
    >
    > Sure fire tube patching 101.
    >
    > 1. Rough up area over hole.
    > 2. Clean with alcohol to remove any oils. (Hypodermic prep swabs work great for this)
    > 3. Apply vulcanizing glue to area greater than patch.
    > 4. Allow to completely dry for 5 mins. (most important step)
    > 5. Apply patch and press firmly in to glue.
    >
    > Never had a patch fail.
    >
    > Mike

    I tend to go like this.

    1. Remove tube, look for hole

    2. Inflate tube, find hole.

    3. Deflate tube, get glue, lose hole repeat steps 1 & 2

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  4. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > Sure fire tube patching 101.
    >
    > 1. Rough up area over hole.
    > 2. Clean with alcohol to remove any oils. (Hypodermic prep swabs work great for this)
    > 3. Apply vulcanizing glue to area greater than patch.
    > 4. Allow to completely dry for 5 mins. (most important step)
    > 5. Apply patch and press firmly in to glue.

    I think step 1 is just as important as step 4. I've never done the alcohol rub thing and have never
    had a patch fail.

    Ken
     
  5. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in news:b3u9so$qsu$1 @newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk:
    > 1. Remove tube, look for hole
    >
    > 2. Inflate tube, find hole.
    >
    > 3. Deflate tube, get glue, lose hole repeat steps 1 & 2

    2.5 Mark hole with a pen. If you're on the road and can't find anything to mark the hole, tie a knot
    just below it.

    Ken
     
  6. Gary German

    Gary German Guest

    "Roy Zipris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the glue
    > dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again? I guess I have to remove the
    > glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what? Thanks. Roy Zipris

    Good advice from all re: how to patch a punctured tire.

    But, I advise not patching it beside the road in the first place. It takes too long, and it's
    sometimes difficult to find/mark the actual site of the puncture.

    Better by far (IMHO), is to carry a spare tube in a zip-lock baggie with some talcum powder thrown
    into it. Then, all you need to do is check the inside of your tire to make sure you don't still have
    some glass or a thorn embedded in it, replace the old tube with the new one, and you are good to go.

    Patching a tire at home, rather than beside the road, is much less aggravating.

    Note: you'll still need to carry a patch kit, in case you get a second flat (rare, but it happens).

    Gary G.
     
  7. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > > Sure fire tube patching 101.
    > >
    > > 1. Rough up area over hole.
    > > 2. Clean with alcohol to remove any oils. (Hypodermic prep swabs work great for this)
    > > 3. Apply vulcanizing glue to area greater than patch.
    > > 4. Allow to completely dry for 5 mins. (most important step)
    > > 5. Apply patch and press firmly in to glue.
    >
    >
    > I think step 1 is just as important as step 4. I've never done the
    alcohol
    > rub thing and have never had a patch fail.
    >
    > Ken

    You're probably right there too. I just do the alcohol thing because it makes the patch area nice
    and clean.

    Mike - and I kinda like the smell. ;^)
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Roy Zipris wrote:
    > I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the glue
    > dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again?

    There's a danger of ripping the tube (parts of the patch may have bonded). It's better just add some
    more cement to the bits that are peeling up, allow to dry, then press down again. But if that's not
    feasible, then try and remove patch or cut your losses and throw away tube.

    > I guess I have to remove the glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what?

    I'm not sure you need to, but sanding will do.

    ~PB
     
  9. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Gary German" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in news:v65d2g8fjq0d54 @corp.supernews.com:
    > Better by far (IMHO), is to carry a spare tube in a zip-lock baggie with some talcum powder thrown
    > into it.

    I usually carry 2 tubes, but I have gotten 4 flats on an all day ride. I always carry a patch kit
    with me on the road for those, hopefully rare, days.

    Ken
     
  10. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Roy Zipris writes:

    > I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the glue
    > dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again? I guess I have to remove the
    > glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what?

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.1.html

    There's more in there than you may first suspect. I think knowing why things work or don't work is
    more important than to follow a rote recipe.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected].org Palo Alto CA
     
  11. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Roy Zipris) writes:

    >I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the glue
    >dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again? I guess I have to remove the
    >glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what?

    Sometimes I can peel the leaking patch off, but most of the time some part of the patch
    really-really sticks and the tube tears. If it comes off cleanly I have re-patched them. If I have
    one of the slow bubble things working it's way out from the side of the patch I have simply stuck
    another patch over that part (you oughta see some of my tubes :)

    I think this is in the FAQ, but if you carry an extra tube you can avoid patching on the road,
    which is qood. Then, when you get home you can patch the tube under nice conditions and give the
    glue about 24 hours to set up (that is the FAQ portion, writen I think by Mr. Brandt). It's a
    good system.

    You HAVE to really rough up the area to be glued (see the FAQ) and you also must allow the glue time
    to dry (as has been mentioned) before applying the patch. I use my watch to be sure I let it dry for
    at least 5 minutes, especially when outside under adverse conditions where I am tempted to push the
    limits. Sticking to all these things has reduced my patch failure substantially. I suspect it is
    even more important to rough up the tube well when using the "instant" or "no glue" patches.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  12. AndyMorris <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I tend to go like this.

    : 1. Remove tube, look for hole

    : 2. Inflate tube, find hole.

    : 3. Deflate tube, get glue, lose hole repeat steps 1 & 2

    It helps to use a biro or whatever to mark the hole with 'cross hairs' so that you can find it again
    once all the prepping is done.

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  13. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Tom Gibb writes:

    > I think this is in the FAQ, but if you carry an extra tube you can avoid patching on the road,
    > which is good. Then, when you get home you can patch the tube under nice conditions and give the
    > glue about 24 hours to set up (that is the FAQ portion, written I think by
    > Mr. Brandt). It's a good system.

    As was mentioned, after a day or so the patch, at least that part that did not separate, cannot be
    removed. That is how well these patches stick if you don't try to ride on a freshly patched tube.

    > You HAVE to really rough up the area to be glued (see the FAQ) and you also must allow the glue
    > time to dry (as has been mentioned) before applying the patch.

    Roughing up is not the goal as others who use solvents have mentioned. The purpose of the sand paper
    in the patch kit is to remove the skin of the tube that contains mold release from manufacture.
    That's why a piece of 1" wide fairly fine belt sander belt is ideal. Those cheese graters on some
    auto patch kits were made by people who had no idea what their forebears had intended when they made
    fine fine cheese graters. These guys thought they were doing the customer a favor. It's amazing how
    such things get lost if you don't write them on the package or in a book.

    > I use my watch to be sure I let it dry for at least 5 minutes, especially when outside under
    > adverse conditions where I am tempted to push the limits.

    Not necessary. On a dry hot day the glue is dry after no more than 30sec while on a cold dank
    day it may take more than a minute, but you can see that. There should be no liquid/gelled glue
    on the tube.

    > Sticking to all these things has reduced my patch failure substantially. I suspect it is even more
    > important to rough up the tube well when using the "instant" or "no glue" patches.

    That sounds pretty sticky, the tube stuck to all these things...

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  14. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Lindsay Rowlands writes:

    >> I tend to go like this.

    >> 1. Remove tube, look for hole

    >> 2. Inflate tube, find hole.

    >> 3. Deflate tube, get glue, lose hole repeat steps 1 & 2

    > It helps to use a biro or whatever to mark the hole with 'cross hairs' so that you can find it
    > again once all the prepping is done.

    It can be done more simply, if the leak is really so small the hole can't be seen. To find the hole,
    inflate the tube to about twice its natural size and run it past our open mouth. Even a tiny jet of
    air is detectable that way. When found, sand at that place with the tube inflated and apply glue.
    Even a small hole will make a tiny white bubble. After it dries, let the air out and put the patch
    in place. The glue dries faster on a stretched tube anyway.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  15. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Ken wrote:
    > "Gary German" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in news:v65d2g8fjq0d54 @corp.supernews.com:
    >
    >>Better by far (IMHO), is to carry a spare tube in a zip-lock baggie with some talcum powder thrown
    >>into it.
    >
    >
    > I usually carry 2 tubes, but I have gotten 4 flats on an all day ride. I always carry a patch kit
    > with me on the road for those, hopefully rare, days.
    >
    > Ken

    Sometimes you think that the "object" that caused the flat came out, but it's really still in a
    thicker part of the tread or on an angle so that it pushes in sometimes, but you can't feel it in
    the tire. I always find the hole and use the hole to know where in the tire to check (2 places in
    case I get the tube turned around :)). I always put my tire on with the label opposite the valve to
    make this easier -- I don't have to remember the tire's orientation.

    David
     
  16. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Gary German" <[email protected]_NOSPAMX_.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Roy Zipris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm a novice at patching tubes--successful at times, not at others (I suspect I don't let the
    > > glue dry enough). If a patch doesn't hold, can I remove it and try again? I guess I have to
    > > remove the glue from the failed attempt, yes? If so, with what? Thanks. Roy Zipris
    >
    > Good advice from all re: how to patch a punctured tire.
    >
    > But, I advise not patching it beside the road in the first place. It
    takes
    > too long, and it's sometimes difficult to find/mark the actual site of the puncture.
    >
    > Better by far (IMHO), is to carry a spare tube in a zip-lock baggie with some talcum powder thrown
    > into it. Then, all you need to do is check the inside of your tire to make sure you don't still
    > have some glass or a
    thorn
    > embedded in it, replace the old tube with the new one, and you are good to go.
    >
    > Patching a tire at home, rather than beside the road, is much less aggravating.
    >
    > Note: you'll still need to carry a patch kit, in case you get a second
    flat
    > (rare, but it happens).
    >
    > Gary G.
    >
    I'm one of the "carry a spare tube" kinda riders. Much faster to pull out a new tube and install
    without patching the old one first. Consideration for riding buddies being foremost on my list.
    Noone likes to stand around on the side of a road watching glue dry.

    On top of the tube, I carry one of the "instant patch kits" from Park. If you have a second flat,
    you can patch the first tube while it is off the bike, install, and be on your way again quickly. A
    word of warning about the instant patches: they are not permanent. You'll need to break out the old
    fashioned glue patches when you are back in the comfort of your garage.

    I've used patches to reinforce holes in tires where I've picked up nails, etc. so the tube
    doesn't bulge out of the tire. Beats either waiting for someone to come get you, or walking back
    to the vehicles.

    Mike
     
  17. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Mike S. <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Noone likes to stand around on the side of a road watching glue dry.

    Tell Peter Noone to stop watching the glue dry, and sing a song with the Hermits. ;->

    Art Harris
     
  18. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Sun, 2 Mar 2003 19:00:04 -0500, "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Sure fire tube patching 101.
    >
    >1. Rough up area over hole.
    >2. Clean with alcohol to remove any oils. (Hypodermic prep swabs work great for this)
    >3. Apply vulcanizing glue to area greater than patch.
    >4. Allow to completely dry for 5 mins. (most important step)
    >5. Apply patch and press firmly in to glue.

    My patching regime would eliminate step 2, and add step 3.1 and 3.2, which are:

    3.1 Allow to completely dry for 15 mins.
    4.2 Apply more vulcanizing glue to area greater than patch.

    I read somewhere years ago that this makes a more secure patch and do it if I have time, like when
    I'm patching a tube at home. When on the road I eliminate the added coat of glue.

    I'm not at all sure if the added coat actually improves things, but it works for me. We all have our
    little quirks and I don't tie and solder my spokes. :)

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  19. I use a silver ink marker pen. Shows up well.

    GJ "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in news:b3u9so$qsu$1 @newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk:
    > > 1. Remove tube, look for hole
    > >
    > > 2. Inflate tube, find hole.
    > >
    > > 3. Deflate tube, get glue, lose hole repeat steps 1 & 2
    >
    > 2.5 Mark hole with a pen. If you're on the road and can't find anything
    to
    > mark the hole, tie a knot just below it.
    >
    > Ken
     
  20. Roy Zipris

    Roy Zipris Guest

    Thanks to all who offered their experience and knowledge. I repatched the tube, this time waiting
    patiently for the glue to dry, and the patch appears to have held. Lesson reinforced. --Roy Zipris
     
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