Patch kits obsolete?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mike Kruger, Jul 14, 2004.

  1. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    Evidently there is at least one LBS that doesn't sell patch kits!

    I was having lunch with a co-worker, and he narrated the following story:
    Saturday he had a flat tire on his bike, and went into a bike shop to buy a
    patch kit. The LBS explained that no bike shop carried patch kits any more,
    and tried to sell him a tube.

    My co-worker then went to a hardware store and bought a patch kit.

    The co-worker was asking my assurance that patching tires wasn't a stupid
    thing to do, and I said I hoped not, because there were a couple of patches
    on the tires I rode in that morning.

    I can see an individual rider choosing to replace a tube every time --
    that's a personal decision. And I can understand bike shops not patching a
    tube. With labor cost and the possibility of patch failure there's little
    point to patching a customer's tube.

    But anyone ever heard of a bike shop not selling patch kits? This sounds
    like a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic item.


    --
    Mike Kruger
    If there's a shortage of inner tubes and a shortage of patch kits, what will
    we do? ;)
     
    Tags:


  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in news:milJc.11363$Jk2.8247
    @roc.nntpserver.com:
    > But anyone ever heard of a bike shop not selling patch kits? This sounds
    > like a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic item.


    The shops I use all have a stack of them sitting next to the cash register.
     
  3. Same here..
    sounds like a typical lame-ass LBS excuse.

    Mike
    http://mikebeauchamp.com

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in news:milJc.11363$Jk2.8247
    > @roc.nntpserver.com:
    > > But anyone ever heard of a bike shop not selling patch kits? This sounds
    > > like a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic item.

    >
    > The shops I use all have a stack of them sitting next to the cash

    register.
     
  4. On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 02:23:06 +0000, Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in news:milJc.11363$Jk2.8247
    >@roc.nntpserver.com:
    >> But anyone ever heard of a bike shop not selling patch kits? This sounds
    >> like a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic item.

    >
    >The shops I use all have a stack of them sitting next to the cash register.


    Yeah, really. Kind of like candy at the supermarket.

    I wasn't aware of any hardware stores in my town that carried patch
    kits though!

    -Luigi
     
  5. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Mike Kruger" wrote: (clip) a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic
    item.(clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^
    It doesn't happen often, but when I am lied to like that, I leave, and don't
    return. The only way that store could get my business back would be to fire
    the guy.
     
  6. HardwareLust

    HardwareLust Guest

    Luigi de Guzman wrote:
    > On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 02:23:06 +0000, Ken <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:milJc.11363$Jk2.8247 @roc.nntpserver.com:
    >>> But anyone ever heard of a bike shop not selling patch kits? This
    >>> sounds like a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic item.

    >>
    >> The shops I use all have a stack of them sitting next to the cash
    >> register.

    >
    > Yeah, really. Kind of like candy at the supermarket.
    >
    > I wasn't aware of any hardware stores in my town that carried patch
    > kits though!
    >


    My home town's only "bike shop" was the Ace hardware store. Perfectly
    normal to go there and buy tubes, parts, etc.

    We had to (get our parents to) drive 6 miles down the road to go to a "real"
    LBS.

    Now, I got 3 LBS's in a 10 mile radius of my house, but they all suck so
    bad, I wouldn't piss on them if they were on fire.

    Regards,
    H.
     
  7. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 14 Jul 2004 23:53:01 -0400,
    <[email protected]>, Luigi de Guzman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I wasn't aware of any hardware stores in my town that carried patch
    >kits though!
    >
    >-Luigi


    I went to my local Canadian Tire Store for a new tube of glue.
    Their blister-packed tube of glue, a dozen patches and the grater
    thing was the same price as just the glue.
    Same size tube of the same glue.
    Free patches.
    --
    zk
     
  8. > Same here..
    > sounds like a typical lame-ass LBS excuse.


    "Typical" LBS excuse? I dunno, I think this is one of the wilder ones. I
    doubt that it's actually true (that they don't carry patch kits), but rather
    a really really REALLY dreadful employee, who likes to make things up as
    he/she goes along. If it's actually the shop's policy, I'd be thankful that
    the only thing I might have needed there was a patch kit. If it's not, and
    it's just a poor employee, I'd ask to speak with someone higher up the food
    chain, perhaps the buyer, and ask if it's true that you'd have to special
    order a patch kit. Maybe that will get the message through.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  9. Ian G Batten

    Ian G Batten Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mike Kruger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > patch kit. The LBS explained that no bike shop carried patch kits any more,
    > and tried to sell him a tube.


    Vote with your feet.

    ian
     
  10. Ian G Batten wrote:
    I've never heard of a bike shop that doesn't sell patch kits. Kinda
    sounds like a grocery store that doesn't sell milk.


    > In article <[email protected]om>,
    > Mike Kruger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>patch kit. The LBS explained that no bike shop carried patch kits any more,
    >>and tried to sell him a tube.

    >
    >
    > Vote with your feet.
    >
    > ian
     
  11. Pat Lamb

    Pat Lamb Guest

    Ian G Batten wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mike Kruger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>patch kit. The LBS explained that no bike shop carried patch kits any more,
    >>and tried to sell him a tube.

    >
    >
    > Vote with your feet.
    >
    > ian


    And wallet.

    Pat
     
  12. Ningi

    Ningi Guest

    Michael Miller wrote:
    > Ian G Batten wrote:
    > I've never heard of a bike shop that doesn't sell patch kits. Kinda
    > sounds like a grocery store that doesn't sell milk.
    >


    Is this a cheese shop?

    :)

    Pete
     
  13. BillyBubba

    BillyBubba Guest

    "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Evidently there is at least one LBS that doesn't sell patch kits!
    >
    > I was having lunch with a co-worker, and he narrated the following story:
    > Saturday he had a flat tire on his bike, and went into a bike shop to buy a
    > patch kit. The LBS explained that no bike shop carried patch kits any more,
    > and tried to sell him a tube.
    >
    > My co-worker then went to a hardware store and bought a patch kit.
    >
    > The co-worker was asking my assurance that patching tires wasn't a stupid
    > thing to do, and I said I hoped not, because there were a couple of patches
    > on the tires I rode in that morning.
    >
    > I can see an individual rider choosing to replace a tube every time --
    > that's a personal decision. And I can understand bike shops not patching a
    > tube. With labor cost and the possibility of patch failure there's little
    > point to patching a customer's tube.
    >
    > But anyone ever heard of a bike shop not selling patch kits? This sounds
    > like a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic item.


    Hey them bike shop guys gotta eat! Yoor pal shooda bought a whole new
    wheel and a tire to go with that tube. Besides, don'tcha know that
    trying to "repair" broke stuff is un-American?
     
  14. di

    di Guest

    ">
    > Hey them bike shop guys gotta eat! Yoor pal shooda bought a whole new
    > wheel and a tire to go with that tube. Besides, don'tcha know that
    > trying to "repair" broke stuff is un-American?


    Trying to buy something that you can repair is un-*mart, especially if it's
    made in China
     
  15. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    HardwareLust wrote:
    >
    > Luigi de Guzman wrote:
    > > On Thu, 15 Jul 2004 02:23:06 +0000, Ken <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>> But anyone ever heard of a bike shop not selling patch kits? This
    > >>> sounds like a lame excuse for being out of stock on a basic item.
    > >>
    > >> The shops I use all have a stack of them sitting next to the cash
    > >> register.

    > >
    > > Yeah, really. Kind of like candy at the supermarket.
    > >
    > > I wasn't aware of any hardware stores in my town that carried patch
    > > kits though!


    Pep Boys has them, although they aren't the classy Rema-type. They also
    have those monster hot-patch thingies, the ones you use the little vise
    with and set on fire. Guess those are for tractors, although we don't
    have all that many tractors around here.

    > My home town's only "bike shop" was the Ace hardware store. Perfectly
    > normal to go there and buy tubes, parts, etc.


    Orchard Supply Hardware has a decent selection of bikely stuff, some
    cheesy, some nice.

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    ************************************************
    Horn broken. Watch for finger.
     
  16. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >
    > > Same here..
    > > sounds like a typical lame-ass LBS excuse.

    >
    > "Typical" LBS excuse? I dunno, I think this is one of the wilder ones. I
    > doubt that it's actually true (that they don't carry patch kits), but rather
    > a really really REALLY dreadful employee, who likes to make things up as
    > he/she goes along. If it's actually the shop's policy, I'd be thankful that
    > the only thing I might have needed there was a patch kit. If it's not, and
    > it's just a poor employee, I'd ask to speak with someone higher up the food
    > chain, perhaps the buyer, and ask if it's true that you'd have to special
    > order a patch kit. Maybe that will get the message through.


    More and more I'm coming to believe that we should ALWAYS deal with
    incompetent service by telling the manager/owner. There are too many
    decent people struggling to get along to let jobs be held by hopeless
    jerks.

    Ultimate worst ever: My McD English muffin came with what looked for
    all the world like a bite taken out of it. I could almost discern
    toothmarks. I showed it to the counter person, who looked at it and
    said "They come that way."

    Nope, no slack at all. They blew their chance. Next?

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    ************************************************
    Horn broken. Watch for finger.
     
  17. The Real Bev wrote:
    > More and more I'm coming to believe that we should ALWAYS deal with
    > incompetent service by telling the manager/owner. There are too many
    > decent people struggling to get along to let jobs be held by hopeless
    > jerks.


    I'm wondering how to respond to a more minor customer service
    infraction: I wandered into the local Trek dealer and asked to look at
    some bikes in my size range, just to get an idea of what I need for a
    road bike. He blew me off. That got me to thinking I don't need to
    look like a female Lance wannabe. I might take it up with the store
    owner. Or make comments in his hearing about how I've got a $7k sewing
    machine, think about how much I *might* be willing to spend on a bike
    (actually, not as much as that would imply, hehe), but blow me off again
    and I'll take my business elsewhere.

    It didn't annoy me at first, until a few days later I wandered into a
    nearby Cannondale dealer and the owner chatted me up, apologized for not
    having women-specific bikes in frame sizes I'd like to try, encouraged
    me to look forward to the 2005's that are coming in soon, discussed the
    best frame pump for my current bike, nattered about the TdF with me,
    sold me a heart monitor with *only* the features I wanted and none that
    I didn't. Maybe he just smelled money, but he was certainly more
    focused on customer service than the other store, that's for sure.

    > Ultimate worst ever: My McD English muffin came with what looked for
    > all the world like a bite taken out of it. I could almost discern
    > toothmarks. I showed it to the counter person, who looked at it and
    > said "They come that way."


    Ew. That's truly wretched.

    -km

    --
    the black rose
    GO LANCE GO!!!
    proud to be owned by a yorkie
    http://community.webshots.com/user/blackrosequilts
     
  18. 'Bout 2 months ago, got two patch kits at ACE hardware. They were on the $1
    table. Should've bought all four, but didn't want to be greedy, besides,
    haven't had a flat (yet!!!!). Now, just because I wrote that, I'll get two,
    right? Eric
     
  19. Mike Kruger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I can see an individual rider choosing to replace a tube every time --
    > that's a personal decision. And I can understand bike shops not patching a
    > tube. With labor cost and the possibility of patch failure there's little
    > point to patching a customer's tube.


    Not necessarily. There's a comment about this in Barnett's:

    Many bike shops do not do tube repair. The reason they give is that
    it is more economical to just replace the tube. It is possible that
    they reach this conclusion by taking shortcuts that should not be
    taken when installing a new tube. The process of putting a patch on a
    tube is not time consuming, in itself. It takes a mechanic that knows
    what to do less than 1 minute to apply the glue and the patch, and
    then inspect whether the patch is good. The real time that is
    required comes from searching for the hole in the tube. When shops
    don't patch tubes (citing the economy), it is a good bet that they
    don't inspect the old tube. Inspecting the old tube should never be
    skipped, because this is one of the best ways to determine the cause
    of the flat (and prevent its reoccurrence). Regardless of whether
    your shop does or doesn't patch tubes, don't skip inspecting the old
    tube. (While we are on this subject, patching tubes is a highly
    efficient form of recycling of a product made from a non-renewable
    resource.)

    Also:

    Many bike shops do not patch tubes. The usual excuse is that it is
    not financially sensible. Although this argument has some holes in
    it, there is a more important issue at stake. The variety of tubes
    out there in the real world usually exceeds the variety of stock of
    tubes that a bike shop has on hand. Given the choice between
    installing a tube that is not a good match, or patching a tube that
    has a minor puncture, it is preferable to patch the tube.


    Of course, no reputable shop would ever be opposed to *selling* patch
    kits. (What do you do if you get two flats on a ride? Carry two
    spares?)


    --
    Frederic Briere <*> [email protected]

    => <[email protected]> IS NO MORE: <http://www.abacomsucks.com> <=
     
  20. Fx199

    Fx199 Guest

    >ube. (While we are on this subject, patching tubes is a highly
    > efficient form of recycling of a product made from a non-renewable
    > resource.)
    >


    Since when is rubber non-renewable?
     
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