Patched the inside of a tire

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ken, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean through
    to the tube. When I got home I tried using some super glue
    to plug the cut. With the cut plugged went out riding again.
    During this ride I developed a slow leak eminating from
    where the cut in the tire is. Needless to say the super glue
    plug didn't hold. Loathing to ditch this tire as it doesn't
    yet have 1000k on it, I proceed to patch the cut with an
    inner tube patch. It seems like it's going to work but was
    wondering if anyone else has had any experience doing this.
     
    Tags:


  2. > patch. It seems like it's going to work but was wondering
    > if anyone else has had any experience doing this.

    You don't feel any bumps at each revolution?

    Phil
     
  3. I have sucessfully patched up a Conti tyre, but that was
    through the sidewall.

    I just used an larger sized tube patch, reinforced
    with duct tape

    Paul

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    > right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean
    > through to the tube. When I got home I tried using some
    > super glue to plug the cut. With the cut plugged went out
    > riding again. During this ride I developed a slow leak
    > eminating from where the cut in the tire is. Needless to
    > say the super glue plug didn't hold. Loathing to ditch
    > this tire as it doesn't yet have 1000k on it, I proceed to
    > patch the cut with an inner tube patch. It seems like it's
    > going to work but was wondering if anyone else has had any
    > experience doing this.
     
  4. K&C Russell

    K&C Russell Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    > right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean
    > through to the tube. When I got home I tried using some
    > super glue to plug the cut. With the cut plugged went out
    > riding again. During this ride I developed a slow leak
    > eminating from where the cut in the tire is. Needless to
    > say the super glue plug didn't hold. Loathing to ditch
    > this tire as it doesn't yet have 1000k on it, I proceed to
    > patch the cut with an inner tube patch. It seems like it's
    > going to work but was wondering if anyone else has had any
    > experience doing this.

    I have had a similar problem and was thinking of using the
    patched tyre on the fluid trainer which will slowly wear the
    tread down rather than just throw the tyre. I would not race
    or train on it as my training involves fast descents.

    Kevin
     
  5. Kenny Lee

    Kenny Lee Guest

    Phil, back at home wrote:
    >>patch. It seems like it's going to work but was wondering
    >>if anyone else has had any experience doing this.
    >
    >
    > You don't feel any bumps at each revolution?
    >
    > Phil
    >
    >
    Haven't ridden it yet. But if the bumps are too noticeable
    then I guess I'll just have to chuck it or just use it as a
    last resort spare on those long far away from the nearest
    LBS rides.

    Kenny Lee
     
  6. Kenny Lee

    Kenny Lee Guest

    Phil, back at home wrote:
    >>patch. It seems like it's going to work but was wondering
    >>if anyone else has had any experience doing this.
    >
    >
    > You don't feel any bumps at each revolution?
    >
    > Phil
    >
    >
    Haven't ridden it yet. But if the bumps are too noticeable
    then I guess I'll just have to chuck it or just use it as a
    last resort spare on those long far away from the nearest
    LBS rides.

    Kenny Lee
     
  7. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Ken) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    > right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean
    > through to the tube.

    Some patch kits include a "boot" patch that is intended to
    repair tires. It is thicker and larger than tire patches and
    usually a different color (e.g., green instead of orange).
    Many people consider boots to be temporary; just to get you
    home. Sometimes they last a long time. Failure can be very
    unpleasant, especially on the front tire. Personally, I
    would replace a tire with a 1cm cut in the casing.
     
  8. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 15:37:48 +0000, Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] (Ken) wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >> Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    >> right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean
    >> through to the tube.
    >
    >Some patch kits include a "boot" patch that is intended
    >to repair tires. It is thicker and larger than tire
    >patches and usually a different color (e.g., green
    >instead of orange). Many people consider boots to be
    >temporary; just to get you home. Sometimes they last a
    >long time. Failure can be very unpleasant, especially on
    >the front tire. Personally, I would replace a tire with a
    >1cm cut in the casing.

    There was a time you could buy casing patches from Third
    Hand/Loose Screws. These were large (about 1" diameter)
    fabric reinforced patches. I patched a number of older
    Michelin tires with these and rode them for many, many
    miles. These disappeared from their catalog many years ago,
    and a quick check of their web site didn't find any.

    Does anyone know if these are still available anywhere?

    On a whim I just went down to the garage and checked, and
    sure enough; I still have a patched Hi-Lite Supercomp. The
    patch is actually 1.25" in diameter and is black with a thin
    blue border.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net
    http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  9. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    [email protected] (Ken) writes:

    > Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    > right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean
    > through to the tube. When I got home I tried using some
    > super glue to plug the cut. With the cut plugged went out
    > riding again. During this ride I developed a slow leak
    > eminating from where the cut in the tire
    > is. Needless to say the super glue plug didn't hold.
    > Loathing to ditch this tire as it doesn't yet have
    > 1000k on it, I proceed to patch the cut with an inner
    > tube patch. It seems like it's going to work but was
    > wondering if anyone else has had any experience doing
    > this.

    There are instructions in the FAQ for applying a boot to
    tires with damaged casings.
     
  10. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 17:30:20 GMT, John Everett
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >There was a time you could buy casing patches from Third
    >Hand/Loose Screws. These were large (about 1" diameter)
    >fabric reinforced patches. I patched a number of older
    >Michelin tires with these and rode them for many, many
    >miles. These disappeared from their catalog many years ago,
    >and a quick check of their web site didn't find any.
    >
    >Does anyone know if these are still available anywhere?

    Auto Zone. I bought this there: http://www.brandnametools.b-
    iz/automotive/r/Repair_Kits/_1419457.htm

    It's got some really thick, tough patches, intended
    AFAIK for patching tubeless radial automotive tires from
    the inside. Note that it's illegal in some/many/all
    places to do so, and I bought it specifically for
    bicycle tire boot purposes.

    I promptly lost it, of course...
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  11. Kenny Lee

    Kenny Lee Guest

    Kenny Lee wrote:
    > Phil, back at home wrote:
    >
    >>> patch. It seems like it's going to work but was
    >>> wondering if anyone else has had any experience
    >>> doing this.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> You don't feel any bumps at each revolution?
    >>
    >> Phil
    >>
    >>
    > Haven't ridden it yet. But if the bumps are too noticeable
    > then I guess I'll just have to chuck it or just use it as
    > a last resort spare on those long far away from the
    > nearest LBS rides.
    >
    > Kenny Lee

    Went out for a ride. No lumps or bumps that I can detect.
    Will keep riding it and see what kind of mileage I get.

    Kenny Lee
     
  12. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Ken wrote:
    > Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    > right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean
    > through to the tube. When I got home I tried using some
    > super glue to plug the cut. With the cut plugged went out
    > riding again. During this ride I developed a slow leak
    > eminating from where the cut in the tire is. Needless to
    > say the super glue plug didn't hold. Loathing to ditch
    > this tire as it doesn't yet have 1000k on it, I proceed to
    > patch the cut with an inner tube patch. It seems like it's
    > going to work but was wondering if anyone else has had any
    > experience doing this.

    If the Pro Race has the woven casing like other
    Michelins, try stitching the slit shut with dental floss
    (from the inside).

    Try to get your stitches to penetrate the casing but not the
    tread (a bit tricky). Make the stitches wide enough that
    they don't pull out of fraying casing. When done, clean the
    outside of the cut well with soap and water, then super glue
    shut. Put a garden-variety patch over the inside to keep the
    stitches from chafing the inner tube.

    I've gotten LOTS of miles out of badly cut Michelins this
    way. In some cases, you have to know the cut is there or you
    wouldn't notice. In other cases, you get a mild bulge (not
    enough to feel while riding).

    Mark Janeba
     
  13. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    John Everett <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 15:37:48 +0000, Ken <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >[email protected] (Ken) wrote in
    > >news:[email protected]:
    > >> Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm
    > >> cut right in the middle of the tread. The cut went
    > >> clean through to the tube.
    > >
    > >Some patch kits include a "boot" patch that is intended
    > >to repair tires. It is thicker and larger than tire
    > >patches and usually a different color (e.g., green
    > >instead of orange). Many people consider boots to be
    > >temporary; just to get you home. Sometimes they last a
    > >long time. Failure can be very unpleasant, especially on
    > >the front tire. Personally, I would replace a tire with a
    > >1cm cut in the casing.
    >
    > There was a time you could buy casing patches from Third
    > Hand/Loose Screws. These were large (about 1" diameter)
    > fabric reinforced patches. I patched a number of older
    > Michelin tires with these and rode them for many, many
    > miles. These disappeared from their catalog many years
    > ago, and a quick check of their web site didn't find any.
    >
    > Does anyone know if these are still available anywhere?
    >
    > On a whim I just went down to the garage and checked, and
    > sure enough; I still have a patched Hi-Lite Supercomp. The
    > patch is actually 1.25" in diameter and is black with a
    > thin blue border.
    >
    >
    > jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3

    Dear John,

    Perhaps you're thinking of Park Tire Boots, which Loose
    Screws no longer offers, as far as I can see. They're sold
    by BikeToolsEtc--just search for "boot":

    http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi

    They may also be available from Peter Chisholm, Andrew Muzi,
    Sheldon Brown, John Dacey, and other worthy dealers on
    rec.bicycles.tech.

    I'm pretty sure that one is lurking in my seat bag, probably
    under the rolled-up Kevlar bead tire.

    Carl Fogel

    be

    http://www.loosescrews.com/
     
  14. John Everett <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 15:37:48 +0000, Ken <[email protected]>
    > wrote:

    > >Some patch kits include a "boot" patch that is intended
    > >to repair tires. It is thicker and larger than tire
    > >patches and usually a different color (e.g., green
    > >instead of orange). Many people consider boots to be
    > >temporary; just to get you home. Sometimes they last a
    > >long time. Failure can be very unpleasant, especially on
    > >the front tire. Personally, I would replace a tire with a
    > >1cm cut in the casing.

    > There was a time you could buy casing patches from Third
    > Hand/Loose Screws. These were large (about 1" diameter)
    > fabric reinforced patches. ...

    Tyvek fabric, from mailing envelopes, works. An energy bar
    wrapper will work for onroad repair (I just carry some Tyvek
    with my patch kit). Agree that tires with large cuts should
    be replaced or relegated to non-critical use.

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  15. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 9 Mar 2004 22:18:14 -0800, [email protected] (Carl Fogel)
    wrote:

    >John Everett <[email protected]>
    >wrote in message
    >news:<o4vr40[email protected]>...
    >>
    >> There was a time you could buy casing patches from Third
    >> Hand/Loose Screws. These were large (about 1" diameter)
    >> fabric reinforced patches. I patched a number of older
    >> Michelin tires with these and rode them for many, many
    >> miles. These disappeared from their catalog many years
    >> ago, and a quick check of their web site didn't find any.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know if these are still available anywhere?
    >>
    >Dear John,
    >
    >Perhaps you're thinking of Park Tire Boots, which Loose
    >Screws no longer offers, as far as I can see. They're sold
    >by BikeToolsEtc--just search for "boot":
    >
    >http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi

    Nope, just checked and these are the wrong size and are self-
    adhesive. The ones I used to use were applied just like a
    tube patch.

    >They may also be available from Peter Chisholm, Andrew
    >Muzi, Sheldon Brown, John Dacey, and other worthy dealers
    >on rec.bicycles.tech.

    Let's hope!

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net
    http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  16. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Mark Janeba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s01...
    > Ken wrote:
    > > Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm
    > > cut right in the middle of the tread. The cut went
    > > clean through to the tube. When I got home I tried
    > > using some super glue to plug the cut. With the cut
    > > plugged went out riding again. During this ride I
    > > developed a slow leak eminating from where the cut in
    > > the tire is. Needless to say the super glue plug didn't
    > > hold. Loathing to ditch this tire as it doesn't yet
    > > have 1000k on it, I proceed to patch the cut with an
    > > inner tube patch. It seems like it's going to work but
    > > was wondering if anyone else has had any experience
    > > doing this.
    >
    > If the Pro Race has the woven casing like other Michelins,
    > try stitching the slit shut with dental floss (from the
    > inside).
    >
    > Try to get your stitches to penetrate the casing but not
    > the tread (a bit tricky). Make the stitches wide enough
    > that they don't pull out of fraying casing. When done,
    > clean the outside of the cut well with soap and water,
    > then super glue shut. Put a garden-variety patch over the
    > inside to keep the stitches from chafing the inner tube.
    >
    > I've gotten LOTS of miles out of badly cut Michelins this
    > way. In some cases, you have to know the cut is there or
    > you wouldn't notice. In other cases, you get a mild bulge
    > (not enough to feel while riding).
    >
    > Mark Janeba
    >
    I back that up with a section of velox tape. On smaller cuts
    a strip of velox makes a boot that lasts until the tire
    wears out. Use on rear tire only. Front tires are no place
    to get creative. Bill Brannon
     
  17. I have found that a product called "Shoe-Goo" works pretty
    good for cuts in tires: http://www.shoegoo.co.jp/en/ -tom

    "> >
    > > Mark Janeba
    > >
    > I back that up with a section of velox tape. On smaller
    > cuts a strip of velox makes a boot that lasts until the
    > tire wears out. Use on rear tire only. Front tires are no
    > place to get creative. Bill Brannon
     
  18. The correct link to "Shoe-Goo"
    http://www.shoegoo.co.jp/lineup.html -tom

    "Tom Nakashima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have found that a product called "Shoe-Goo" works pretty
    > good for cuts
    in
    > tires: http://www.shoegoo.co.jp/en/ -tom
    >
    >
    > "> >
    > > > Mark Janeba
    > > >
    > > I back that up with a section of velox tape. On smaller
    > > cuts a strip of velox makes a boot that lasts until the
    > > tire wears out. Use on rear tire only. Front tires are
    > > no place to get creative. Bill Brannon
    > >
    >
     
  19. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Ken W? writes:

    > Using Michelin Pro Race tires while riding got a 1cm cut
    > right in the middle of the tread. The cut went clean
    > through to the tube. When I got home I tried using some
    > super glue to plug the cut. With the cut plugged went out
    > riding again. During this ride I developed a slow leak
    > emanating from where the cut in the tire is. Needless to
    > say the super glue plug didn't hold. Loathing to ditch
    > this tire as it doesn't yet have 1000k on it, I proceed to
    > patch the cut with an inner tube patch. It seems like it's
    > going to work but was wondering if anyone else has had any
    > experience doing this.

    With a casing cut, even if it isn't large enough to let the
    tube burst out, will nibble at the tube at the cut and
    cause a leak. Such a cut as you describe needs structural
    help and that requires a fabric inlay commonly known as a
    boot. These used to be offered for car tires tubeless tires
    were not yet invented. The feature of a boot is that it
    must flex with the casing and have enough strength to not
    slip out of place.

    The following item from the FAQ explains how to do this for
    a tubular tire (one with the tube sewn into the hose-like
    casing) but the method is the same. I carry a rectangular
    piece of thin tire casing for that purpose. Because I don't
    consider this a long term repair for a clincher, I don't
    glue it in and finish the ride.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

    Casing Repair

    Repairing tubular tires requires latex emulsion. You can get
    it from carpet layers, who usually have it in bulk. You must
    have a container and beg for a serving. If you are repairing
    a tubular you probably ride them, and therefore, will have
    dead ones lying around. The best tubulars generally furnish
    the best repair material.

    Most cuts of more than a few cords, like a glass cut,
    require a structural boot. With thin latex tubes, uncovered
    casing cuts will soon nibble through the tube and cause
    another flat. For boot material, pull the tread off a silk
    sprint tire, unstitch it and cut off the bead at the edge of
    the fold. Now you have a long ribbon of fine boot material.
    Cut off a 10cm long piece and trim it to a width that just
    fits inside the casing of the tire to be booted from inside
    edge of the bead (the folded part) to the other edge.

    The boot must be trimmed using a razor blade to a thin
    feathered edge so that the tube is not exposed to a step at
    the boot's edge, otherwise this will wear pinholes in a thin
    latex tube. Apply latex to the cleaner side of the boot and
    the area inside the tire, preferably so the boot cords are
    90 degrees from the facing tire cords.

    Insert the boot and press it into place, preferably in the
    natural curve of the tire. This makes the the boot the
    principal structural support when the tire is again
    inflated, after the boot cures. If the casing is flat when
    the boot is glued, it will stretch the casing more than the
    boot upon inflation. After the boot dries, and this goes
    rapidly, sew the tire.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  20. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    John Everett <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 9 Mar 2004 22:18:14 -0800, [email protected] (Carl
    > Fogel) wrote:
    >
    > >John Everett <[email protected]>
    > >wrote in message
    > >news:<[email protected]>...
    > >>
    > >> There was a time you could buy casing patches from
    > >> Third Hand/Loose Screws. These were large (about 1"
    > >> diameter) fabric reinforced patches. I patched a number
    > >> of older Michelin tires with these and rode them for
    > >> many, many miles. These disappeared from their catalog
    > >> many years ago, and a quick check of their web site
    > >> didn't find any.
    > >>
    > >> Does anyone know if these are still available anywhere?
    > >>
    > >Dear John,
    > >
    > >Perhaps you're thinking of Park Tire Boots, which Loose
    > >Screws no longer offers, as far as I can see. They're
    > >sold by BikeToolsEtc--just search for "boot":
    > >
    > >http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi
    >
    > Nope, just checked and these are the wrong size and are
    > self-adhesive. The ones I used to use were applied just
    > like a tube patch.
    >
    > >They may also be available from Peter Chisholm, Andrew
    > >Muzi, Sheldon Brown, John Dacey, and other worthy dealers
    > >on rec.bicycles.tech.
    >
    > Let's hope!
    >
    >
    > jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3

    Dear John,

    Hmmm . . . I'm baffled. I checked my 2000-2001 Third Hand
    catalogue (the last) and found nothing else that sounds like
    a tire boot except the Park Tire Boot.

    There is, however, the Rema feather edge patch, sold 100 in
    a box, and described as a 1" round patch versus the tire
    boot's 1.5" x 3" oblong. But this is just a tube patch and
    probably not what you have in mind.

    Maybe they'd stopped selling what you're after?

    Sorry,

    Carl Fogel
     
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