Patching tubes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Pendejo, Apr 25, 2008.

  1. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    This has probably been covered here before, but I'll ask anyway. I've never tried patching tubes after I've gotten a flat, but I've had three flats in the last two days and now I'm thinking I should give it a try. Are the patches reliable?
     
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  2. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    If applied correctly...YES! I have had patched tubes that have lasted longer after being patched than other tubes that never needed patched. I might have some reservations about using them in competition or on an MTB on a really gnarley trail, but you should have no problems with them training or commuting, etc.
     
  3. TheDarkLord

    TheDarkLord New Member

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    A tube with a patch applied properly should be as good as a new tube. Sand the tube around the hole, apply the glue paste, let it dry and then apply the patch.
     
  4. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    the 'hard' part is getting the knack of knowing how long to let the glue dry before putting the patch on.
     
  5. bannerrefugee

    bannerrefugee New Member

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    Let a few go flat then fix them all at once.

    Once your good at it you can patch generaly patch very fast, the main hold up is letting the glue dry a bit.
     
  6. Bigbananabike

    Bigbananabike Member

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    Patching tubes is great fun...ok, maybe not. It saves throwing out a tube to lanquish in a landfill and saves the rubber wasted on a new tube too:) .

    One night last year I did 15 of my tubes that I'd let build up.:eek:

    As others have said, sand the area where the patch will go, use the small sized patches, I leave the glue for 15 mins to tack off and then apply the patch. I put some air in the tube and leave it overnight to make sure its ok before using in my bike:) .
     
  7. cpeters

    cpeters New Member

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    I don't care much for the patches that require you to glue and don't find any advantage to using them. I myself use the Part Tools self adhesive patch. I've never had a problem with them. And you don't have to wait for the glue to dry. There also cheap
     
  8. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    Thanks for the replies, guys. I'll give it a try. (I might try it on all the condoms I break through, also.)
     
  9. TheDarkLord

    TheDarkLord New Member

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    Many self-adhesive patches are junk though. OTOH, you can't go wrong with gluing (if you know how to do it right that is).
     
  10. TheDarkLord

    TheDarkLord New Member

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    Haha! Good luck with that dude! Just keep in mind the potential consequences if you screw up! :p
     
  11. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Its only 18 years, maybe less if something horrible happens:eek:. (Teach the little one that helmets are for fools. Works pretty well.)
     
  12. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    It's a good skill to have, if you run out of tubes on the road, you can patch them to get you home.

    You can also use patches to plug holes in the tyre
     
  13. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    I hope you inspect your tread after every ride. Glass will eventually chew through a kevlar belted tire if left in the tread.
     
  14. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

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    I usually patch them on the road, it only adds 5 min if you can find the hole quickly. The best bet is to get off and use your ear to find the hole as soon as you notice the softening tyre. Once hiss-located, the patch goes on quickly and you don't even need to pull much of the tube out of the tyre. Don't forget to remove the offending sharp thing in the tyre.
    When does a tube get discarded?
    1. No room for new patches
    2. Big blow-out
    3. Valve base dies (probably the commonest death of a tube in my hands)
     
  15. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Same here!
     
  16. Bigbananabike

    Bigbananabike Member

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    Yep, me too:)




     
  17. Akadat

    Akadat New Member

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    A tube repair kit will get you through many flats and weighs less than a spare tube.

    All the tubes of glue have caps that cannot screw on tight, so the glue dries out before the patches are used up. I bought a miniture glass bottle with a strong screw cap and squirt all the glue into the bottle.

    Getting puncture-proof tires has been the best solution by far, the contents of my glass bottle are still good after a year of non-use.
     
  18. Farmguy

    Farmguy New Member

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    Instead of carrying patches, I just carry a tube of super glue, when you get a flat, pinch tube so hole kind of opens up then apply a small drop of superglue on hole then let go and flatten out tube, By the time you get the top back on glue, glue is dry and ready to install. The new superglue gel works even better. I have done this twice and so far Im 2/2. At home I then apply a patch.
     
  19. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    I'm always ready to patch on the road, but I've had so many frustrating times on the side of a noisy road trying to find the tiny hole. It's not only the noise, but the rush (I'm either commuting or with a group) AND - and this is the depressing part - at 50+ years old, I just can't see tiny stuff without my reading glasses and I don't carry them cycling. So I just find it easier, quicker and more pleasant to carry an lightweight tube in the seat bag. It's very small (I suck the air out to compress it, and tie with a rubber band).

    I also carry either a park glueless patch kit or a small regular patch kit. I've had excellent results with the little Park glueless patches. Although they MIGHT not be as reliable as a glued patch (I haven't had an issue though), when you look at the big picture, they are. That is because sooner or later you'll be burned by a broken and/or dried up tube of glue and be stuck. The little Park glueless patches are pretty much fool proof, and if you apply them correctly (which is no more effort than a glued patch: roughen properly and clean), they will get you home for sure, and probably last "forever". I haven't tried any other brands though.
     
  20. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

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    I think that the risk of your glue drying up in the tube is quite low and really is applicable to the tube sitting in your cupboard for years. I have an excess of good tubes of glue at the moment because each tube can do many more patches than come with it in the box.
     
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