Pavlova & Deliciously Wicked Chocolate Cake

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by LadyJane, Apr 8, 2006.

  1. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    As I mentioned in Appetisers Again.... baked two desserts for a dear
    friend's birthday tomorrow.
    Here is the pavlova... undressed and cooling in the pan:
    http://tinypic.com/t8b6de.jpg
    and here is the chocolate cake (still cooling too) before splitting,
    filling and icing
    http://tinypic.com/t8b6yx.jpg

    hopefully will take a snap or two before departing tomorrow so I can
    share the finished result

    Am feeling very pleased with myself...

    Here's the pav recipe

    6 egg whites
    1/8 tsp cream of tartar
    1 cup castor sugar
    2 Tblsp cornflour
    2 tsp white vinegar

    Preheat oven to 200ºC
    Grease a large springform pan and dust with cornflour, tapping off
    excess.
    Sift sugar, cornflour and cream of tartar.
    Using an electric mixer (hey I am not a sadist!!) beat egg whites until
    glossy and stiff peaks form.
    Gradually add the sugar/flour/c of t and continue beating well after
    each addition.
    Drizzle the vinegar over mixture and gently fold through using a
    spatula.
    Pile mixture into springform pan and put in pre-heated oven.
    Immediately reduce heat to 120ºC and bake for 1¼ to 1½ hours.
    Should be ever so slightly golden.
    Leave pavlova in oven to cool, with door ajar.

    Top with:
    (my choice) macerated fresh peaches, hulled strawberries, sliced (I
    peel the fruit and use an egg slicer) kiwi fruit, passionfruit atop
    huge - I mean HUGE - dollops of whipped cream (add 1 Tbls
    icing/confectioner's sugar to stablise the cream - or do as I am doing
    and use high-cholesterol, high calorie, hugely delicious double
    cream!!)
    Dust with icing sugar and/or chocolate curls.

    May your arteries never clog!

    LadyJane
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
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  2. graham

    graham Guest

    "LadyJane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    As I mentioned in Appetisers Again.... baked two desserts for a dear
    friend's birthday tomorrow.
    Here is the pavlova... undressed and cooling in the pan:
    http://tinypic.com/t8b6de.jpg


    I make mine free-form but they look like yours:) However, they are so
    fragile - I wonder what the commercial ones have in them to make them a bit
    stronger.
    I used to live in Perth and some delis would make them to order for you but
    I was never that lazy:)
    BTW if your pav really breaks up, use it to make Eton Mess. Break it into
    walnut-sized pieces and mix with strawberries and whipped cream just before
    serving.
    Graham
     
  3. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On 8 Apr 2006 00:10:24 -0700, "LadyJane" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >As I mentioned in Appetisers Again.... baked two desserts for a dear
    >friend's birthday tomorrow.
    >Here is the pavlova... undressed and cooling in the pan:
    >http://tinypic.com/t8b6de.jpg


    I've never made pavlova in a tin. I always put the mixture directly on
    the oven tray.

    Wouldn't the sides be soft, baked in a tin?

    Kathy in NZ
     
  4. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    It's now 8.30pm Sunday evening. The day was brilliant!
    Luncheon was for 12... no mean feat in an inner city stuio terrace
    townhouse!
    Our hostess was well prepared. Crab, dill, creme freche, lime & caviar
    or avocado & macadamia appetisers in miniature pastry cases to start.
    Main course was fabulous: Morroccan Chicken; roasted veg (beans,
    parsnips, potatoes, capsicum, pumpkin, small salad onions; tossed green
    salad with fetta and black olives and loads of crusty pane de casa -
    with plenty of fantastic Aussie reds and whites to suit each
    individual.
    (Note: if spelling is off, is more than likely due to the fact I have
    been quaffing great wines (some of which we provided) for the best part
    of 6 hours!!!)
    Then to dessert -
    the Pavlova http://tinypic.com/talfm0.jpg
    and the Chocolate cake http://tinypic.com/talfuw.jpg (which is a bit
    out of focus - only remembered to snap some pics about 30 seconds
    before scarpering out the door!!)
    Both went down a treat - and sadly, none left over for our hostess to
    enjoy later this evening or tomorrow!

    And Kathy, no, the sides of the pavlova weren't soft.. the springform
    tin worked really well (first time I've tried this method) and will
    certainly use it again rather than the free-form, schlooped in the
    middle of a baking sheet. It held together remarkably well - we had to
    travel 40 minutes to get there and it still looked marvellous. Was
    tempted to take the unfilled pav, and fillings, and compile there, but
    didn't want to intrude on kitchen space.
    NB: I greased the tin well, then dusted base & sides with cornflour,
    then (for good measure) I used a round of baking paper which I placed
    over the base and reclipped the outside onto base (trapping the paper
    and not having it up the side of the tin).
    Allowed to cool in oven. Stored in airtight container overnight.
    Removed from tin, trimmed excess paper and placed into a suitably sized
    quiche dish for serving.
    The chicken was delicious - am going to bombard our hostess with emails
    until she sends me the recipe!! Once obtained will post in rfc. <nudge,
    nudge, wink, wink>

    LadyJane
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    "LadyJane" <[email protected]> wrote:

    The pavlova is beautiful, LJ! Cake, too, be the pav especially.
    Congratulations.
    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 4-2-06, Church review #11

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  6. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    Aww,,,, thanks for your kind comments Barb!

    LadyJane
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
  7. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On 9 Apr 2006 03:36:04 -0700, "LadyJane" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >And Kathy, no, the sides of the pavlova weren't soft.. the springform
    >tin worked really well (first time I've tried this method) and will
    >certainly use it again rather than the free-form, schlooped in the
    >middle of a baking sheet. It held together remarkably well - we had to
    >travel 40 minutes to get there and it still looked marvellous. Was
    >tempted to take the unfilled pav, and fillings, and compile there, but
    >didn't want to intrude on kitchen space.
    >NB: I greased the tin well, then dusted base & sides with cornflour,
    >then (for good measure) I used a round of baking paper which I placed
    >over the base and reclipped the outside onto base (trapping the paper
    >and not having it up the side of the tin).
    >Allowed to cool in oven. Stored in airtight container overnight.
    >Removed from tin, trimmed excess paper and placed into a suitably sized
    >quiche dish for serving.


    Thanks for the directions. I will try this method next time I make a
    pav. Bought pavs are so uniform, they're obviously made in a tin or
    somesuch, but I've never dared try myself.

    Kathy in NZ



    >LadyJane
    >--
    >"Never trust a skinny cook!"
    >
     
  8. Miche

    Miche Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "graham" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > BTW if your pav really breaks up, use it to make Eton Mess. Break it into
    > walnut-sized pieces and mix with strawberries and whipped cream just before
    > serving.


    That's a favourite dessert in our house, although we make it with
    broken-up meringues rather than pavlova.

    And then there's the variation we make with raspberries instead of
    strawberries, which goes by the name Un-Eton Mess! ;)

    Miche

    --
    WWMVD?
     
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