pay about $100 for a famous brand watch

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Rooney, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. Rooney

    Rooney Guest

    Tags:


  2. At Wed, 13 Jul 2005 18:28:32 +0100, message
    <[email protected]> was posted by Tony Raven
    <[email protected]>, including some, all or none of the following:

    >Would you send your money/credit card details to an unknown Chinese
    >spammer selling fake goods? If you do you deserve everything you get.


    For some reason the clue-free seem to think that anything with a
    "dart-calm" address is in Leftpondia, or at the very least Somewhere
    Legitimate.


    Guy
    --
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    "To every complex problem there is a solution which is
    simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken
     
  3. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Call me Bob wrote:
    >
    > There are a number of spammers making huge fortunes on the basis of "a
    > fool and his money...."
    >
    > I think the American evangelist movement works on the same method.
    >


    Heard yesterday of someone I had thought quite sensible who had their
    bank accounts cleared out after confirming their ebay account details as
    requested by the e-mail! You can fool some of the people all of the
    time and those are the ones they are after!

    --
    Tony

    "I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
    Anon
     
  4. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Heard yesterday of someone I had thought quite sensible who had their
    > bank accounts cleared out after confirming their ebay account details as
    > requested by the e-mail! You can fool some of the people all of the
    > time and those are the ones they are after!


    There was an item on TV a couple of days ago where they used "researchers"
    to collar people on the street. The "researchers" started off asking
    innocuous questions which gradually developed until the target eventually
    gave them all sorts of personal banking details.

    Pete
     
  5. Tumbleweed

    Tumbleweed Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Call me Bob wrote:
    >>
    >> There are a number of spammers making huge fortunes on the basis of "a
    >> fool and his money...."
    >>
    >> I think the American evangelist movement works on the same method.
    >>

    >
    > Heard yesterday of someone I had thought quite sensible who had their bank
    > accounts cleared out after confirming their ebay account details as
    > requested by the e-mail! You can fool some of the people all of the time
    > and those are the ones they are after!
    >


    When some banks still send emails to people asking them to click on the link
    to confirm their details, its no surprise that people can be fooled by
    similar spoofs. Citybank were doing it only a few months ago.

    --
    Tumbleweed

    email replies not necessary but to contact use;
    tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
     
  6. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Tumbleweed wrote:
    > When some banks still send emails to people asking them to click on the link
    > to confirm their details, its no surprise that people can be fooled by
    > similar spoofs. Citybank were doing it only a few months ago.


    Are you sure? I doubt that Citybank would actually email their customers
    with a link in the mail given that all the general bank publicity states
    that following such links is daft.

    Jon
     
  7. citizen142

    citizen142 Guest

    There is an upside to this you know. Only two years ago that nice
    Nigerian gentleman Mr Odoku Massambula deposited £7,000,000 (seven
    million GBP) in my account. I hate to take advantage of my fellow
    mankind's stupidity and generosity but it only cost me £10,000 - which
    I deposited in his account in Lagos.

    Got to go - Matrons coming around with the tea trolley.
     
  8. Tumbleweed

    Tumbleweed Guest

    "Jon Senior" <jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOT_co_DOT_uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Tumbleweed wrote:
    >> When some banks still send emails to people asking them to click on the
    >> link to confirm their details, its no surprise that people can be fooled
    >> by similar spoofs. Citybank were doing it only a few months ago.

    >
    > Are you sure? I doubt that Citybank would actually email their customers
    > with a link in the mail given that all the general bank publicity states
    > that following such links is daft.
    >
    > Jon


    Indeed. Someone posted the example on uk.finance 4 or 5 months ago. It
    turned out to be true. And when the person who received it complained, they
    replied saying that their systems had the highest security, entirely missing
    the point. I think it was a dilbert cartoon that pointed out that the
    strongest known force in the universe is 'stupidity'.

    --
    Tumbleweed

    email replies not necessary but to contact use;
    tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
     
  9. Tumbleweed

    Tumbleweed Guest

    "citizen142" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > There is an upside to this you know. Only two years ago that nice
    > Nigerian gentleman Mr Odoku Massambula deposited £7,000,000 (seven
    > million GBP) in my account. I hate to take advantage of my fellow
    > mankind's stupidity and generosity but it only cost me £10,000 - which
    > I deposited in his account in Lagos.
    >
    > Got to go - Matrons coming around with the tea trolley.
    >


    www.419eater.com

    --
    Tumbleweed

    email replies not necessary but to contact use;
    tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
     
  10. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Tumbleweed wrote:
    > Indeed. Someone posted the example on uk.finance 4 or 5 months ago. It
    > turned out to be true. And when the person who received it complained, they
    > replied saying that their systems had the highest security, entirely missing
    > the point. I think it was a dilbert cartoon that pointed out that the
    > strongest known force in the universe is 'stupidity'.


    Genius! After my personal experience with LloydsTSB <Shakes head,
    laughs> I shouldn't be surprised, but I'd expected better from Citybank.

    Jon
     
  11. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Tumbleweed wrote:
    > Indeed. Someone posted the example on uk.finance 4 or 5 months ago. It
    > turned out to be true. And when the person who received it complained, they
    > replied saying that their systems had the highest security, entirely missing
    > the point. I think it was a dilbert cartoon that pointed out that the
    > strongest known force in the universe is 'stupidity'.


    And in a random spin-off from Dilbert (A link from the wondrous
    dilbert.com):

    http://www.dilbert.com/comics/unfit/archive/unfit-20050620.html

    Jon
     
  12. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

  13. In article <[email protected]>, Jon Senior wrote:
    >Tumbleweed wrote:
    >> Indeed. Someone posted the example on uk.finance 4 or 5 months ago. It
    >> turned out to be true. And when the person who received it complained, they
    >> replied saying that their systems had the highest security, entirely missing
    >> the point. I think it was a dilbert cartoon that pointed out that the
    >> strongest known force in the universe is 'stupidity'.

    >
    >Genius! After my personal experience with LloydsTSB <Shakes head,
    >laughs> I shouldn't be surprised, but I'd expected better from Citybank.


    I'm fairly sure I've seen similar comments on comp.risks
     
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