PC RANT

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Sandy Morton, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 30/3/05 4:18 pm, in article [email protected], "wafflycat"
    <wafflesATv21netDOTcoDOTuk> wrote:

    >
    > "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> Yes, you can 'protect' people from 'risks', but all you'll do is end up
    >> with half a population that's so timid it doesn't dare live life, and
    >> the other half that are so uneducated about risk that they don't know
    >> not to take foolish ones. Any child who gets through childhood without
    >> at least one broken limb has missed out on a lot of necessary learning.
    >>

    >
    > Well Nathan did manage to break a finger when he was younger, so he's
    > alright then ;-)


    The only bones I broke at school were other peoples. I did however get into
    trouble both at primary and secondary school for climbing on the school
    roof.

    ...d
     


  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 30/3/05 4:49 pm, in article [email protected], "wafflycat"
    <wafflesATv21netDOTcoDOTuk> wrote:

    >
    > "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>
    >> One chemistry teacher wot I had decided to demonstrate the reaction
    >> between
    >> sodium (or was it potassium?) and water, by chucking a large lump of the
    >> former into a glass wossname of the latter. The resultant explosion would
    >> have done the gas board proud, though happily no-one was injured.
    >>

    >
    > Potassium. Yor kemistree teechur was mi kemistree teechur and i klame mi
    > five powndz.
    >


    Sodium. AN inch cube in a fire bucket was quite sufficient (outside in the
    car park with everyone standing well back) to demonstrate a vigorous
    exothermic reaction.

    The cubic millimetre of potassium in concentrated nitric acid was enough to
    blow a hole in the bottom of the glass beaker it was in (which was itself in
    a large perspex vessel of water), indicating the oxidative effect of certain
    acids.

    Why does nobody remember any chemistry except what went bang?

    ...d (BSc in Chemistry)
     
  3. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 09:41:47 +0100 someone who may be "vernon levy"
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >You wouldn't want to get involved in taking a school trip abroad, after many
    >revisions my compulsory risk assessment was five pages long and had to cover mundane
    >things like getting on and off the coach, coping with travel sickness, kids getting
    >lost, storage and dispensation of medication for pre-existing alments of kids...the list
    >went on and on


    A few months ago we did our bit for the community and exhibit what
    we do to schoolchildren. Below is the totality of the boxes I filled
    in. I have re-arranged the boxes to be shown vertically. This waste
    of time did not make anyone safer, it was simply a box-ticking
    exercise.

    RISK
    WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?
    IS MORE NEEDED TO CONTROL THE RISK?

    Computer or printer fall off desk and land on someone's toes.
    Pupils, teaches, ourselves.
    Rubber feet on bottom of printer and computer.

    Electrocution.
    Pupils, teaches, ourselves.
    Inspection of condition prior to setup. RCD.





    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me by using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  4. wafflycat wrote:
    > "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>
    >> One chemistry teacher wot I had decided to demonstrate the reaction
    >> between
    >> sodium (or was it potassium?) and water, by chucking a large lump of
    >> the former into a glass wossname of the latter. The resultant
    >> explosion would have done the gas board proud, though happily no-one
    >> was injured.
    >>

    >
    > Potassium. Yor kemistree teechur was mi kemistree teechur and i klame
    > mi five powndz.


    Yours was a large square-jawed bloke called Phil Hackney too? What are the
    chances of /that/ happening, eh, readers?

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    World Domination?
    Just find a world that's into that kind of thing, then chain to the
    floor and walk up and down on it in high heels. (Mr. Sunshine)
     
  5. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Richard wrote:
    >
    > Yes, learning from experience. When I use the wire brush on the
    > circular drill (or, indeed, anything rotating at speed), I always wear
    > safety specs. I never used to, but then I worked with a guy with a
    > glass eye, who'd lost his eye through one of the bristles being ejected
    > at high speed...
    >


    "Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from
    the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent
    disinclination to do so."

    Douglas Adams

    Tony
     
  6. On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 16:58:58 +0100, David Hansen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 09:41:47 +0100 someone who may be "vernon levy"
    ><[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >
    >>You wouldn't want to get involved in taking a school trip abroad, after many
    >>revisions my compulsory risk assessment was five pages long and had to cover mundane
    >>things like getting on and off the coach, coping with travel sickness, kids getting
    >>lost, storage and dispensation of medication for pre-existing alments of kids...the list
    >>went on and on

    >
    >A few months ago we did our bit for the community and exhibit what
    >we do to schoolchildren. Below is the totality of the boxes I filled
    >in. I have re-arranged the boxes to be shown vertically. This waste
    >of time did not make anyone safer, it was simply a box-ticking
    >exercise.
    >
    >RISK
    >WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?
    >IS MORE NEEDED TO CONTROL THE RISK?
    >
    >Computer or printer fall off desk and land on someone's toes.
    >Pupils, teaches, ourselves.
    >Rubber feet on bottom of printer and computer.
    >
    >Electrocution.
    >Pupils, teaches, ourselves.
    >Inspection of condition prior to setup. RCD.


    I once got bollocked by my previous manager because I didn't fill out
    an accident form when a two year old fell over on the ward. He didn't
    fall over anything. He just fell over. That's what two year olds do.

    When I reluctantly filled out the form I needed to ask for advice when
    I came to the section on "What measures can reasonably be implemented
    to prevent recurrence".

    That was one of the many things that prompted me to write this (which
    has been mentioned here before):

    http://www.artybee.net/html/think_of_the_children.html

    --
    Microsoft Sam speaks his mind:
    www.artybee.net/sam_speaks_his_mind.mp3
     
  7. Simon Brooke <simo[email protected]>typed

    > Yes, you can 'protect' people from 'risks', but all you'll do is end up
    > with half a population that's so timid it doesn't dare live life, and
    > the other half that are so uneducated about risk that they don't know
    > not to take foolish ones. Any child who gets through childhood without
    > at least one broken limb has missed out on a lot of necessary learning.


    I never broke a bone as a kid. I was dyspraxic, neurotic and had
    somewhat delayed motor development.

    I was scared of climbing anything from which I couldn't descend and
    unhappy to jump off things.

    My two sisters never broke any bones either. One brother broke his wrist
    jumping off stairs, one brother broke a bone in his hand when he walked
    into a school doorpost and the youngest's forearm snapped when his
    *much* [1] bigger brother kicked a football at it.

    I don't think we missed out on much.

    [1] 20 year old & 6 feet tall, 12 stone v 9 years old and 4½ stone...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  8. "wafflycat" <wafflesATv21netDOTcoDOTuk>typed



    > "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]


    > >
    > > One chemistry teacher wot I had decided to demonstrate the reaction
    > > between
    > > sodium (or was it potassium?) and water, by chucking a large lump of the
    > > former into a glass wossname of the latter. The resultant explosion would
    > > have done the gas board proud, though happily no-one was injured.
    > >


    > Potassium. Yor kemistree teechur was mi kemistree teechur and i klame mi
    > five powndz.


    > Cheers, helen s


    Both sodium and potassium were added to water in my skule. We stood
    quite a distance away and only a small, pea-sized piece was cautiously
    added.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  9. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > Yours was a large square-jawed bloke called Phil Hackney too? What are
    > the
    > chances of /that/ happening, eh, readers?
    >


    Amazing. In my neck of the woods he went by the name of Mr Edwards or Dr
    Bamford. Obviously he had multiple personalities!

    Cheers, helen s

    > --
    >
    > Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    > World Domination?
    > Just find a world that's into that kind of thing, then chain to the
    > floor and walk up and down on it in high heels. (Mr. Sunshine)
    >
    >
     
  10. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 16:40:49 +0100 someone who may be "Dave
    Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >One chemistry teacher wot I had decided to demonstrate the reaction between
    >sodium (or was it potassium?) and water, by chucking a large lump of the
    >former into a glass wossname of the latter. The resultant explosion would
    >have done the gas board proud, though happily no-one was injured.


    You ought to try potassium and liquid bromine [1].

    I can still remember the bright flash, loud bang and white smoke
    covering most of the laboratory. Somewhat stunned I recall breathing
    out the white smoke and our excellent chemistry teacher appearing
    through the smoke, wafting it away as he approached. He was
    impressed that I was still holding the gas jar in which I had
    undertaken this activity and said it was the best explosion he had
    seen since the one he caused at college.

    I gather school chemistry has now been largely destroyed by
    excessive "safety". It is only by making mistakes that one learns.
    Hopefully the mistakes will not be as big as the one I made, but
    that possibility will exist. Nobody was killed or injured, though on
    occasions the teachers did have to react to dangerous occurrences of
    various sorts.

    There was an element of danger in the explosion, to myself and
    others. Whether this danger was greater than the many other dangers
    in the school is debatable. Had I done it deliberately it would have
    been a very stupid thing to do. However in the chemistry club I
    suspect we were individually sussed out by the teachers. People had
    to do their own research and then present what they proposed to do
    for approval. Some people were allowed to make small quantities of
    explosives, sadly they did not explode when tested (probably
    impure). This did not prevent things going wrong, but spectacular
    events like the explosion I caused were rare.


    [1] not something I did deliberately by the way, my survival
    instinct is too finely honed. I was unaware that some liquid
    remained in the bottom of the gas jar.


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me by using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  11. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 15:50:10 +0100 someone who may be Simon Brooke
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >So you had an exciting experience (which you've remembered) and you
    >learned something about handling hot materials? This is a bad thing?


    I entirely agree.

    There are other lessons as well. When I was doing my engineering
    training (part of) this involved traditional casting with wooden
    patterns and "green" sand moulding boxes, something we never did at
    school (though we did do forging). However, the iron was only red
    hot. Far more dangerous, in my view, was making the patterns.
    Woodworking machinery cuts through wood very rapidly and anyone
    daydreaming is only likely to find they are machining their hands
    when they feel the pain.


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me by using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  12. Brian Wakem

    Brian Wakem Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 16:58:58 +0100, David Hansen
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 09:41:47 +0100 someone who may be "vernon levy"
    >><[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >>
    >>>You wouldn't want to get involved in taking a school trip abroad, after
    >>>many
    >>>revisions my compulsory risk assessment was five pages long and had to
    >>>cover mundane things like getting on and off the coach, coping with
    >>>travel sickness, kids getting lost, storage and dispensation of
    >>>medication for pre-existing alments of kids...the list went on and on

    >>
    >>A few months ago we did our bit for the community and exhibit what
    >>we do to schoolchildren. Below is the totality of the boxes I filled
    >>in. I have re-arranged the boxes to be shown vertically. This waste
    >>of time did not make anyone safer, it was simply a box-ticking
    >>exercise.
    >>
    >>RISK
    >>WHO MIGHT BE HARMED?
    >>IS MORE NEEDED TO CONTROL THE RISK?
    >>
    >>Computer or printer fall off desk and land on someone's toes.
    >>Pupils, teaches, ourselves.
    >>Rubber feet on bottom of printer and computer.
    >>
    >>Electrocution.
    >>Pupils, teaches, ourselves.
    >>Inspection of condition prior to setup. RCD.



    I think I would have answered:-

    Paper cut from filling in this form.
    Me.
    Destroy form.


    > I once got bollocked by my previous manager because I didn't fill out
    > an accident form when a two year old fell over on the ward. He didn't
    > fall over anything. He just fell over. That's what two year olds do.
    >
    > When I reluctantly filled out the form I needed to ask for advice when
    > I came to the section on "What measures can reasonably be implemented
    > to prevent recurrence".



    Wrap everybody in cotton wool, pressumably.


    --
    Brian Wakem
     
  13. Chris

    Chris Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    > Sodium. AN inch cube in a fire bucket was quite sufficient (outside in the
    > car park with everyone standing well back) to demonstrate a vigorous
    > exothermic reaction.
    >
    > The cubic millimetre of potassium in concentrated nitric acid was enough to
    > blow a hole in the bottom of the glass beaker it was in (which was itself in
    > a large perspex vessel of water), indicating the oxidative effect of certain
    > acids.
    >
    > Why does nobody remember any chemistry except what went bang?
    >
    > ..d (BSc in Chemistry)
    >


    We were doing a particularly nasty batch of refluxes one day (in fume
    cupboards, behind blast screens, through asbestos gloves... you get the
    picture; damned if I can remember the reaction now though). It just so
    happened that one of us had smuggled some dry ice in, inside a Thermos.
    The lecturer was a particularly neurotic woman who nobody liked much, so
    what to do was obvious.
    We got a beaker similar to the one in use in the experiments, filled it
    with hot water and liberal dry ice, then walked through the middle of
    the lab holding it at arms length going "Miiissss.... should it be doing
    this?"

    I swear I have never seen anyones colour drain away so fast.

    I can attest that you could hear the fire alarms quite well from the
    mustering point in the quad :)

    Ahh... those were the days...

    --
    Chris
     
  14. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 30/3/05 5:45 pm, in article [email protected], "Brian Wakem"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I think I would have answered:-
    >
    > Paper cut from filling in this form.
    > Me.
    > Destroy form.


    Nice one.. ;-)

    ...d
     
  15. Simon Brooke <[email protected]> writes:

    > Any child who gets through childhood without at least one broken limb
    > has missed out on a lot of necessary learning.


    Apparently, there are some people who can actually learn from other
    people's mistakes, obviating the need to make them themselves.

    I learned that riding a BMX over a plank suspended on an industrial skip
    was pretty stupid, but it was Christian Morgan who did his bit for
    my education by breaking his leg.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    "New songs and true songs and songs to bring you"
     
  16. On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 16:18:00 +0100, wafflycat wrote:

    > "Michael MacClancy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 15:41:58 +0100, wafflycat wrote:

    >
    >> Similar things happened in my comprehensive school. Indeed, I'm sure the
    >> type of school has no relevance. I wonder then why wafflycat included a
    >> reference to her grammar school?
    >> --
    >> Michael MacClancy

    >
    > Err... because it *was* a grammar school?
    >


    .... and not because you're one of those snooty grammar school snobs? ;-)

    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  17. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "David Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BE708B2D.D470%[email protected]
    >
    > Why does nobody remember any chemistry except what went bang?
    >


    Oh no, I *adored* chemistry - have a great love of the subject, even though
    I stupidly gave it up & did cr*p at A-level chemistry. I could wax long &
    lyrical (but probably not accurately)about the elegance of the periodic
    table and Mendeleyev as I rediscovered my love of chemistry (science
    generally) in later years.

    Cheers, helen s


    > ..d (BSc in Chemistry)
    >
     
  18. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    >
    > Why does nobody remember any chemistry except what went bang?
    >


    And why in nobody interested in taking Chemistry at University these
    days? Because they are not allowed to be enthused for the subject by
    the bangs, smells and all the other stuff that gained our interest but
    is now forbidden in case is damages the nervous disposition of someone's
    little darling

    Tony
     
  19. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Brian Wakem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I think I would have answered:-
    >
    > Paper cut from filling in this form.
    > Me.
    > Destroy form.
    >
    >


    Digressing, but along the lines of answering stupid questions. I once had to
    fill in a form wher there was space to fill after question, "Position in
    office" so I wrote "sitting down on seat at my desk". Personnel were not
    best pleased & I got repremanded for not taking form-filling in the serious
    way it should be.

    Cheers, helen s
     
  20. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 30/3/05 6:08 pm, in article [email protected], "wafflycat"
    <wafflesATv21netDOTcoDOTuk> wrote:

    >
    > "David Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BE708B2D.D470%[email protected]
    >>
    >> Why does nobody remember any chemistry except what went bang?
    >>

    >
    > Oh no, I *adored* chemistry - have a great love of the subject, even though
    > I stupidly gave it up & did cr*p at A-level chemistry. I could wax long &
    > lyrical (but probably not accurately)about the elegance of the periodic
    > table and Mendeleyev as I rediscovered my love of chemistry (science
    > generally) in later years.
    >

    I failed to reach my potential in Chemistry A level through sheer hard
    lazinesss. Spent too much time juggling chemicals in the dark room, and
    doing all sorts of other distractions.

    I did however end up doing a chemistry degree and subsequently learned a
    number of interesting things, including that theoretical foundations are
    boring at the time but essential to really understanding what is going on.

    I seem to have forgotten most of it now, but love watching programs like
    Rough Science..

    ...d
     
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