PC RANT

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Sandy Morton, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:05:46 +0100, Danny Colyer wrote:

    >
    > CBeebies is a channel, not a programme. Any idea which programme?


    What's the story, wouldn't you like to know?
     


  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 30/3/05 8:24 pm, in article [email protected],
    "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:05:46 +0100, Danny Colyer wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> CBeebies is a channel, not a programme. Any idea which programme?

    >
    > What's the story, wouldn't you like to know?


    Not sure. I'll Mull it over for a while..

    and then get my coat.

    ...d
     
  3. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Get onto Roger Geffen at the CTC about this, they may well be able
    > to make something of it.


    I have asked the BBC for a formal letter of cancellation. I will
    either post it here or put it on my website. The reseracher did say
    that she wouldn't be back in her office until Monday.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton
    on the Bicycle Island
    In the Global Village
    http://www.millport.net
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Michael MacClancy
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 15:41:58 +0100, wafflycat wrote:
    >
    >> My favourite recollection of grammar school chemistry was when one of
    >> the lads in class set fire to the workbench during the experiment of
    >> distillation of crude oil by managing to concoct a river of oil along
    >> the top of the bench which connected to the bunsen burner flame :)

    >
    > Similar things happened in my comprehensive school. Indeed, I'm sure
    > the type of school has no relevance. I wonder then why wafflycat
    > included a reference to her grammar school?


    Jesus, how small can you get? She made reference to a grammar school
    because that's what she went to.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    [ This .sig intentionally left blank ]
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Michael
    MacClancy ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:14:01 +0100, wafflycat wrote:
    >
    >> "Michael MacClancy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>> ... and not because you're one of those snooty grammar school snobs?
    >>> ;-)
    >>>

    >> I do believe you've been watching too much "Tricia", you read into
    >> things what is not there.

    >
    > Oh, I wouldn't agree with that. The word 'grammar' was there and I
    > assume
    > that it had a purpose. You could have referred to 'school chemistry'
    > or even 'secondary school chemistry', each of which would have been
    > more egalitarian than 'grammar school chemistry'.


    Have you had that chip valued? It's the most remarkable example I think
    I've ever seen.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; in faecibus sapiens rheum propagabit
     
  6. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

  7. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <BE708B2D.D470%[email protected]>, David Martin
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    >> "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>> One chemistry teacher wot I had decided to demonstrate the reaction
    >>> between
    >>> sodium (or was it potassium?) and water, by chucking a large lump of
    >>> the
    >>> former into a glass wossname of the latter. The resultant explosion
    >>> would have done the gas board proud, though happily no-one was
    >>> injured.

    >
    > Sodium. AN inch cube in a fire bucket was quite sufficient (outside in
    > the car park with everyone standing well back) to demonstrate a
    > vigorous exothermic reaction.
    >
    > The cubic millimetre of potassium in concentrated nitric acid was
    > enough to blow a hole in the bottom of the glass beaker it was in
    > (which was itself in a large perspex vessel of water), indicating the
    > oxidative effect of certain acids.
    >
    > Why does nobody remember any chemistry except what went bang?


    Well, it does tend to demonstrate why nobody learns any chemistry any
    more.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; 99% of browsers can't run ActiveX controls. Unfortunately
    ;; 99% of users are using the 1% of browsers that can...
    [seen on /. 08:04:02]
     
  8. the.Mark

    the.Mark Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    > On 30/3/05 6:49 pm, in article
    > [email protected], "Tim Hall"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:12:32 +0100, David Martin
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 30/3/05 6:08 pm, in article [email protected],
    >>> "wafflycat"

    >>
    >>> I seem to have forgotten most of it now, but love watching
    >>> programs like Rough Science..
    >>>

    >>
    >> Kathy Sykes does it for me, too......

    >
    > But shes a .....
    >
    >
    > ...physicist!
    >
    > ..d


    I'd go for her considering what the chemist looks like.
    --
    Mark MRSC

    HND (BSc Chemistry dropout.)
     
  9. On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 00:45:10 +0100, Sandy Morton <[email protected]>
    wrote in message <[email protected]>:

    >I was phoned this morning, day of the hire, by the researcher to say
    >that the person in London in carge of health and safety would not
    >allow children to cycle on the public roads.


    Tossers. I presume they also refuse to allow children to travel by
    private car?


    Guy
    --
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    "To every complex problem there is a solution which is
    simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken
     
  10. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005, Sandy Morton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Original confirmation letter said "Tikkabilla"


    My daughter likes Tikkabilla. I haven't a clue what it is (she sees
    it at teh child-minders).

    regards, Ian SMith
     
  11. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    >
    > But shes a .....
    >
    >
    > ....physicist!
    >


    Well, get physical then

    Tony ;-)
     
  12. David Hansen wrote:
    > There was an element of danger in the explosion, to myself and
    > others. Whether this danger was greater than the many other dangers
    > in the school is debatable. Had I done it deliberately it would have
    > been a very stupid thing to do. However in the chemistry club I
    > suspect we were individually sussed out by the teachers. People had
    > to do their own research and then present what they proposed to do
    > for approval. Some people were allowed to make small quantities of
    > explosives, sadly they did not explode when tested (probably
    > impure).


    Yes, the theory was sound but the alleged Ammonium perchlorate didn't
    explode at all chiz.

    And my rockets never moved either, though they burnt quite well.

    Colin McKenzie
     
  13. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:49:47 +0100, Tim Hall wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 18:12:32 +0100, David Martin
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On 30/3/05 6:08 pm, in article [email protected], "wafflycat"

    >
    >>I seem to have forgotten most of it now, but love watching programs like
    >>Rough Science..
    >>

    >
    > Kathy Sykes does it for me, too......


    Oooh yes.
    And they were building rockets tonight (didn't get to see the end).
    Dare I say it's not rocket science....
     
  14. hyweldavies

    hyweldavies Guest

    Whilst I (strongly) agree with the general sentiment on this thread, I
    have to jump in with some corrections to vernon's post - which was no
    doubt flippant in order to make his(valid) poin.. No doubt (proper)
    legal folks could tidy this up, but it is nonetheless based on
    extensive reading of a very thick law book

    As preamble, there is no legal obligation to save the toddler, even if
    you could do it with little inconvenience to yourself. (Unlike in
    France apparently)

    That said, if you try and save the aforesaid toddler, and then kill him
    in the attempt, you would only be liable if he is in a worse state than
    if you'd left him alone - however incompetent you had been in the
    attempt. If you had made a reasonable-under-the-circumstances (ie given
    it's an emergency and given a cool head you could have done better)
    this would still be a good defence. It is also doubtful if the judge
    would find against you on grounds of "policy" ie it being bad for the
    greater good to discourage the Good Samaritan.

    In all this it is important to note that English law is different (and
    generally more sensible) than USA law on these sort of things.
    Cheers
    Hywel
     
  15. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 17:51:33 +0100, Chris wrote:

    > We got a beaker similar to the one in use in the experiments, filled it
    > with hot water and liberal dry ice, then walked through the middle of
    > the lab holding it at arms length going "Miiissss.... should it be doing
    > this?"


    Smile.

    In the spirit of Now It Can Be Told:

    I remember the year when I was a graduate student at Glasgow,
    and there was a halloween party in the research student's club.
    I 'liberated' a couple of thermoses of liquid nitrogen, to make
    fog effects at the bar.

    It was quite spectacular, but dry ice would have made better fog probably.

    Thinking back on this, had some twit put their hand in it or something
    I think the safety officer would have taken a dim view.
     
  16. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    >> Kathy Sykes does it for me, too......

    >
    > Oooh yes.
    > And they were building rockets tonight (didn't get to see the end).
    > Dare I say it's not rocket science....
    >


    There's something deeply Freudian going on here ;-)

    Cheers, helen s
     
  17. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    >
    > Thinking back on this, had some twit put their hand in it or something
    > I think the safety officer would have taken a dim view.
    >

    I expect he or she might have been shattered.

    Cheers, helen s
     
  18. Helen Deborah Vecht <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "wafflycat" <wafflesATv21netDOTcoDOTuk>typed
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]

    >
    > > >
    > > > One chemistry teacher wot I had decided to demonstrate the reaction
    > > > between
    > > > sodium (or was it potassium?) and water, by chucking a large lump of the
    > > > former into a glass wossname of the latter. The resultant explosion would
    > > > have done the gas board proud, though happily no-one was injured.
    > > >

    >
    > > Potassium. Yor kemistree teechur was mi kemistree teechur and i klame mi
    > > five powndz.

    >
    > > Cheers, helen s

    >
    > Both sodium and potassium were added to water in my skule. We stood
    > quite a distance away and only a small, pea-sized piece was cautiously
    > added.


    Ah yes, but once I got to work in a lab, a young bloke called George
    decided to put bits of Lithium in the water tank outside.

    That had a kick.
     
  19. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > in message <[email protected]>, Michael MacClancy
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >


    >>
    >> Similar things happened in my comprehensive school. Indeed, I'm sure
    >> the type of school has no relevance. I wonder then why wafflycat
    >> included a reference to her grammar school?

    >
    > Jesus, how small can you get? She made reference to a grammar school
    > because that's what she went to.
    >


    My brother went to the local secondary modern and I still spoke to him, so I
    can't be *that* snobby ;-)

    Cheers, helen s





    > --
    > [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >
    > [ This .sig intentionally left blank ]
    >
     
  20. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Sandy Morton wrote:
    > Original confirmation letter said "Tikkabilla"


    <drool>
    Sarah Jane Honeywell [1].

    My favourite CBeebies programme for that very reason :)~

    Thanks.

    [1]
    <URL:http://www.secondskinagency.com/profiles/tv_film_theatre/sarah_jane_honeywell.htm>

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    <URL:http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
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