Peak District

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by AndyP, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    Is there any walk in the Peak District that anyone might refer to as "The 3
    Peaks"?
     
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  2. AndyP wrote:

    > Is there any walk in the Peak District that anyone might refer to as

    "The 3
    > Peaks"?


    Ermmm, I live in said area and I've never come across one before.

    We don't really have peaks as such, we have large tracts of variously
    boggy moorlands with vague summits.

    Oh, and Chrome Hill. That's about it really

    Chris
     
  3. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On 7 Feb 2005 09:07:52 -0800, "Chris Gilbert" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >AndyP wrote:
    >
    >> Is there any walk in the Peak District that anyone might refer to as

    >"The 3
    >> Peaks"?

    >
    >Ermmm, I live in said area and I've never come across one before.
    >
    >We don't really have peaks as such...


    Not exactly aptly named, I would venture ;-)

    --
    The plural of spouse is spice.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  4. Bob Mannix

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "AndyP" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Is there any walk in the Peak District that anyone might refer to as "The

    3
    > Peaks"?
    >
    >


    I suspect they meant the Yorkshire Dales, where the nearest "3 peaks" are
    (that's near relative to, say, London)


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
     
  5. Lewis

    Lewis Guest

    Nope but there's some epic walks you can do!

    1. Dove Stones to Edale
    2. Black Hill, Bleaklow Head, Higher Shelf, Kinder Plateau, finish in Edale
    3. Or like me get her indoors to drop you at the Woodhead tunnels and make
    your way across the moors, over Kinder and to Edale.

    I like Edale.

    Lewis
     
  6. John Laird wrote

    > Not exactly aptly named, I would venture ;-)


    Ah, now there you'd be wrong. The name derives from the ancient
    tribe of people who lived here; The Piccas. Not the geography.

    Allegedly

    Chris
     
  7. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
    person Chris Gilbert <[email protected]> said
    >John Laird wrote
    >
    >> Not exactly aptly named, I would venture ;-)

    >
    >Ah, now there you'd be wrong. The name derives from the ancient
    >tribe of people who lived here; The Piccas.


    Very small Types, were they? 8>.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  8. In message <[email protected]>, GSV Three Minds in a Can
    <[email protected]> writes
    >Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the
    >wonderful person Chris Gilbert <[email protected]> said
    >>John Laird wrote
    >>
    >>> Not exactly aptly named, I would venture ;-)

    >>
    >>Ah, now there you'd be wrong. The name derives from the ancient
    >>tribe of people who lived here; The Piccas.

    >
    >Very small Types, were they? 8>.
    >


    Talking of fonts, Wirksworth has an interesting old lead one.
    --
    Chris Morriss
     
  9. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 18:49:51 GMT, "Chris Gilbert"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Laird wrote
    >
    >> Not exactly aptly named, I would venture ;-)

    >
    >Ah, now there you'd be wrong. The name derives from the ancient
    >tribe of people who lived here; The Piccas. Not the geography.
    >
    >Allegedly


    Well, I've learned something (allegedly) new today, then. Ta !

    --
    Just a possum on the information superhighway...

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, John Laird
    <[email protected]> writes
    >On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 18:49:51 GMT, "Chris Gilbert"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>John Laird wrote
    >>
    >>> Not exactly aptly named, I would venture ;-)

    >>
    >>Ah, now there you'd be wrong. The name derives from the ancient
    >>tribe of people who lived here; The Piccas. Not the geography.
    >>
    >>Allegedly

    >
    >Well, I've learned something (allegedly) new today, then. Ta !
    >

    The spelling is Pecsaetan, and I am lead to believe that this translates
    to the "Dwellers in the Peak", which would make the Peak District
    derived from the geography. (Compare Cilternsaetan, Dorsaetan,
    Elmetsaetan, Pencersaetan, Sumorsaetan, Tomsaetan, Wihtsaetan,
    Willsaetan, Wrocensaetan - the dwellers in/around the Chilterns, Dorset,
    Elmet, the Penk?, Somerton, the Tame, the Isle of Wight, the Wylye, and
    the Wrekin. Also the Magonsaetan south and west of the Severn, but the
    derivation of this name is not obvious.)

    Peak is a relatively new word in English (according to the dictionary by
    my computer perhaps a variant of pike, influenced by beak); pike comes
    of OE pic, which meant a conical hill. So we're back to the quandary as
    to why the Peak District is so-called, when it's noticably deficient in
    peaks as opposed to dissected and undissected plateaux. I'd speculate
    that the meaning of pic drifted in the relevant dialect of English.
    --
    Stewart Robert Hinsley
     
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