Pedal Advice

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Cori, Apr 7, 2003.

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  1. Cori

    Cori Guest

    I'm very new to clipless pedals and need advice. I have a pair of Nashbar Rodeo pedals which I've
    been using on my bike in the basement, I'm happy with how they help my pedaling, but they're not
    easy to clip in and out of. Any recommendations for an upgrade? ($25-$50 range, spd) And how do I
    learn how to use them out on the road without killing myself?

    These new pedals will be going on my new Specialized Sequoia Sport. (Damn snow!)

    Cori
     
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  2. Gary Smiley

    Gary Smiley Guest

    Most SPD pedals come with a tension screw that you can adjust with a small allen wrench, which might
    make it easier for you to clip into. Try spending some time in a parking lot and practice getting in
    and out of your pedals. It's like learning a musical instrument- you have to practice to the point
    where everything becomes automatic.

    Cori wrote:

    > I'm very new to clipless pedals and need advice. I have a pair of Nashbar Rodeo pedals which I've
    > been using on my bike in the basement, I'm happy with how they help my pedaling, but they're not
    > easy to clip in and out of. Any recommendations for an upgrade? ($25-$50 range, spd) And how do I
    > learn how to use them out on the road without killing myself?
    >
    > These new pedals will be going on my new Specialized Sequoia Sport. (Damn snow!)
    >
    > Cori
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Cori <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I'm very new to clipless pedals and need advice. I have a pair of Nashbar Rodeo pedals which I've
    > been using on my bike in the basement, I'm happy with how they help my pedaling, but they're not
    > easy to clip in and out of. Any recommendations for an upgrade? ($25-$50 range, spd)

    If you want SPD, why not get a genuine Shimano pedal. Their cheapest pedals should be in your price
    range and should work a little better than the Nashbars.
     
  4. On Mon, 07 Apr 2003 19:09:37 +0000, Cori wrote:

    > I'm very new to clipless pedals and need advice. I have a pair of Nashbar Rodeo pedals which I've
    > been using on my bike in the basement, I'm happy with how they help my pedaling, but they're not
    > easy to clip in and out of.

    These are more-or-less spd pedals, so look for some sort of "tension adjustment, and start out with
    it very loose.

    > Any recommendations for an upgrade? ($25-$50 range, spd)

    I would try to make your current pedals work, first, unless you want to spend over $100 for a more
    high-tech solution/

    > And how do I learn how to use them out on the road without killing myself?

    You will probably fall at least once, but only while coming up to a stop and so barely moving. I did
    it; most people do. Not a big deal. Now, I hardly think about it at all.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster." --Greg LeMond _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  5. Smokey

    Smokey Guest

    Cori <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm very new to clipless pedals and need advice. I have a pair of Nashbar Rodeo pedals which I've
    > been using on my bike in the basement, I'm happy with how they help my pedaling, but they're not
    > easy to clip in and out of. Any recommendations for an upgrade? ($25-$50 range, spd) And how do I
    > learn how to use them out on the road without killing myself?
    >
    > These new pedals will be going on my new Specialized Sequoia Sport. (Damn snow!)
    >
    > Cori

    i've had experience with both shimano and copies of their SPDs, also eggbeaters and times. the
    best i've tried for entry and release is the shimano 536 pedal. it's just been discontinued, but
    there are good buys on them at price point and colorado cyclist. i got mine from price point for
    about $40, w/shipping. i agree with the other poster that shimano has the best release mechanism
    of any SPD. i also had some 515 shimanos, and the 536s work even better. on the MTBreview
    channel, some of the posters have had problems with the bolts that hold the cage on, but i check
    mine occasionally and have had no problems. the 536 has a nice big platform that's easy to find
    and can be used as a flat pedal in a pinch, like when you are stuck on a hill while MTBing. some
    complain of the weight, but if you're not racing that's not a factor. smokey strodtman
     
  6. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Cori" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm very new to clipless pedals and need advice. I have a pair of Nashbar Rodeo pedals which I've
    > been using on my bike in the basement, I'm happy with how they help my pedaling, but they're not
    > easy to clip in and out of. Any recommendations for an upgrade? ($25-$50 range, spd) And how do I
    > learn how to use them out on the road without killing myself?

    Before you buy new pedals, try lubricating the ones you have. A little lubricant (grease/wax/oil) on
    the cleat can make new (SPD-style) pedals
    (dis/en)gage much more smoothly.
     
  7. Cori

    Cori Guest

    > Before you buy new pedals, try lubricating the ones you have. A little lubricant (grease/wax/oil)
    > on the cleat can make new (SPD-style) pedals
    > (dis/en)gage much more smoothly.
    >
    >

    It's not getting out of the pedal that I have problems with, it's getting in. And occasionally I
    come out of them too easily. (Or without even trying.)

    Cori
     
  8. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Cori" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >
    > > Before you buy new pedals, try lubricating the ones you have. A little lubricant
    > > (grease/wax/oil) on the cleat can make new (SPD-style) pedals
    > > (dis/en)gage much more smoothly.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > It's not getting out of the pedal that I have problems with, it's getting in. And occasionally I
    > come out of them too easily. (Or without even trying.)

    You may have an interference problem with the shoe sole and pedal, this is pretty common with SPD,
    the solution is a little trimming with a utility knife.
     
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