Pedal/shoe compatibility issue?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by tedspace, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. tedspace

    tedspace New Member

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    Hi all, this is my first post on here, so sorry if its a stupid question. I joined a road cycling club recently having been a keen cyclist for a while.
    Thing is, these guys are a whole other level to me so im anxious to up my game a bit while training with them and improving overall.

    One thing i was strongly reccommended was to get some real cycling shoes which clip onto the pedals as im still using the default straps that came with my bike.
    Im not really in a position to spend a fortune on kit right now, but i found a set on evans within my price range.
    Specifically, the Wellgo R096B Clipless Road Pedals http://www.evanscycles.com/products/wellgo/r096b-clipless-road-pedals-ec027158
    and the DMT Vision 2.0 Road Shoe http://www.evanscycles.com/products/dmt/vision-20-road-shoe-ec043027
    Both are on sale and a fairly reasonable price. Thing is, because i have never used cycling shoes and cleated pedals before, I have absolutely no idea if these two products are even compatable. I need them fairly quickly and dont want to have to mess about returning products, so if anyone can answer my questions, i would be extremely grateful!! Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. jpr95

    jpr95 Active Member

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    The pedals come with the appropriate cleats to fit them. The cleats are then screwed to the shoes--if you're new to the sport, it's probably best to get a local wrench to help you with this at your LBS, or maybe an experienced rider who does most of his own wrenching.
     
  3. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Yes, they'll be compatible. The pedals come with the cleats, the shoe will have the standard drillings. Aside from having any professional fitting you'll want to position the cleat so it has your foot in a relatively neutral position (i.e. the foot should be pointing in the direction of travel, not excessively toe in or toe out, and it should feel like you are pedaling through the ball of your foot). Make the cleats tight, you don't want them slipping, but not too tight (you don't wanna strip the threads - which can happen, the ease of which is dependent on whatever material hardness are specific to your components). Gettin some help like mentioned above couldn't hurt either.

    Clipless cleats can take some getting used to but also make you feel more connected with the bike imo. Lean against a wall and get used to the motion of clipping in and clipping out (especially this part). Then off you go. Plan ahead when coming to your first few redlights or stop signs and be prepared to clip out. Almost everyone I know has keeled over at one point or another being caught unprepared in the early stages (this was more common with toeclips/straps and cleats). Adjust the cleat position as needed, might need to go further forward and back, etc.
     
  4. tedspace

    tedspace New Member

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    Thanks guys, just ordered them now.
     
  5. tedspace

    tedspace New Member

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    Thanks guys, just ordered them now.
     
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