Pedaling and ankle movement

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Perre, Jan 23, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Perre

    Perre Guest

    I've been watching a lot of photos of people racing and noticed that many times the ankle ís fully
    stretched out when the foot is at the high, 12'o clock position.

    When observing what I do myself it seems that my foot is pretty much flat through the whole circle.

    What are the pros and cons of this? Does it imply that I'm not roundpedaling or are the people with
    stretched out ankles in a sprint or some other situation that calls for this. It seems that it would
    put uneccesary strain on the knees to flex the ankle so much. The opposite would of course be to
    have your heel lower than the pedal at the top of the stroke and higher at the bottom. This would
    call for the least kneemovement, but of course felt pretty weird doing.

    I've read all the advice about scraping mud off your foot at the bottom and pretending you are
    rolling a barrow at the top. When I do this it feels like my heels are below the pedal through the
    entire circle.

    Does the fore-aft positioning on the saddle chaange how the ankle is flexing?

    I would really appreciate some pointers on what to look for when I practise. Does anyone know a
    website explaining this in detail.
     
    Tags:


  2. Perre <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I've been watching a lot of photos of people racing and noticed that many times the ankle ís fully
    : stretched out when the foot is at the high, 12'o clock position.

    Mainstream training guidelines seem to have it that your ankle is extended on the back part of your
    pedal stroke (6 to 12), to put it very roughly. If you extend your ankle while pushing down, you can
    utilize calf muscles, I would assume.

    If one is sprinting at a high rpm, the ankle remains extended through a larger part of the pedal
    revolution.

    : I would really appreciate some pointers on what to look for when I practise. Does anyone know a
    : website explaining this in detail.

    Read Serious Cycling, or find the websites. It's been discussed in the .misc and .tech groups in the
    recent months.

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  3. [email protected] (Perre) wrote in message
    >
    > I would really appreciate some pointers on what to look for when I practise. Does anyone know a
    > website explaining this in detail.

    Ask Noel Crowley http://tinyurl.com/4hk7
     
  4. "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote:
    : <[email protected]> wrote in message
    : news:[email protected]...
    :> Perre <[email protected]> wrote:
    :> : I've been watching a lot of photos of people racing and noticed that many times the ankle ís
    :> : fully stretched out when the foot is at the high, 12'o clock position.
    :>
    :> Read Serious Cycling, or find the websites. It's been discussed in the .misc and .tech groups in
    :> the recent months.
    :>
    : Thanks

    : I take it you mean the one written by Ed Burke. Wonder if they will let me buy chapter 9 "The
    : Biomechanics of Cycling" only ;)

    1. Buy the book
    2. Rip out chapter 9
    3. Sell first part of book as "special edition of SC which parts which don't apply in modern
    training removed"
    4. 3 months later, sell the end part of book as a special supplement to the first part

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  5. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > : news:[email protected]...
    > :> Perre <[email protected]> wrote:
    > :> : I've been watching a lot of photos of people racing and noticed that many times the ankle ís
    > :> : fully stretched out when the foot is at the high, 12'o clock position.
    > :>
    > :> Read Serious Cycling, or find the websites. It's been discussed in the .misc and .tech groups
    > :> in the recent months.
    > :>
    > : Thanks
    >
    > : I take it you mean the one written by Ed Burke. Wonder if they will let
    me
    > : buy chapter 9 "The Biomechanics of Cycling" only ;)
    >
    > 1. Buy the book
    > 2. Rip out chapter 9
    > 3. Sell first part of book as "special edition of SC which parts which don't apply in modern
    > training removed"
    > 4. 3 months later, sell the end part of book as a special supplement to
    the first part
    >

    Good idea. The book is already ordered, so I can't lose. If it's no good however I'll take the ferry
    across the Baltic and rip you out ;)

    --
    Replace the dots to reply

    Perre
     
  6. "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > go check out www.coachcarl.com too. He's got lots of interesting tidbits there.
    >
    > Mike

    I've been spending hours at his site now. There is an amazing amount of interesting
    information there.

    --
    Replace the dots to reply

    Perre
     
  7. Donald Munro

    Donald Munro Guest

    risto.varanka wrote:
    >1. Buy the book
    >2. Rip out chapter 9
    >3. Sell first part of book as "special edition of SC which parts which don't apply in modern
    > training removed"
    >4. 3 months later, sell the end part of book as a special supplement to the first part

    Have you considered applying for a job at Micro$oft.
     
  8. "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Good idea. The book is already ordered, so I can't lose. If it's no good however I'll take the
    : ferry across the Baltic and rip you out ;)

    Hmm I *need* that lowracer!

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  9. Peter Buchas

    Peter Buchas Guest

    ----- Original Message ----- From: "Perre" <[email protected]> Newsgroups:
    rec.bicycles.racing Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 10:36 AM Subject: Pedaling and ankle movement

    > I've been watching a lot of photos of people racing and noticed that many times the ankle ís fully
    > stretched out when the foot is at the high, 12'o clock position.

    Well, there is one more point, you have to observe: From your photos you hardly can tell the cadence
    they are pedalling. When pedalling with higher frequencies you will discover that your "ankle-angle"
    is rising, so you are pedalling with your ankles stretched out more. At cadences over 120 even you
    will have another angle as well. If you prefer that, you for instance can train it by including
    cadence-pyramids in your GII units.

    Regards, Peter Buchas
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...