Pedals for Fixed Gear Bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kalukis, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. Kalukis

    Kalukis Guest

    Well, my new fixed gear bike is on the way (thanks Sheldon).
    As this is my first fixed gear, I've got more than a couple
    of questions. The main one is, what do people recommend for
    pedals? I'm using Look/Campy style pedals on my road bike. I
    understand that double sided pedals may be a better choice
    on a fixed gear--due to the need to get quickly clipped in
    to a bike with no freewheel. I've got a pair of Speedplay
    X-1's that I am ok with; seems like the extra float might
    help while I get used to and adjust the new bike. Any
    suggestions?

    -"FG Newbie" Kalukis
     
    Tags:


  2. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    Recommend Time mtb pedals/cleats, due to consistency and
    reliability. The Speedplays may be ok as well, I have never
    tried them.

    Robert
     
  3. Jim Beam

    Jim Beam Guest

    shimano spd. that's what i have on my fixie and clip in and
    out no problems.

    Kalukis wrote:
    > Well, my new fixed gear bike is on the way (thanks
    > Sheldon). As this is my first fixed gear, I've got more
    > than a couple of questions. The main one is, what do
    > people recommend for pedals? I'm using Look/Campy style
    > pedals on my road bike. I understand that double sided
    > pedals may be a better choice on a fixed gear--due to the
    > need to get quickly clipped in to a bike with no
    > freewheel. I've got a pair of Speedplay X-1's that I am ok
    > with; seems like the extra float might help while I get
    > used to and adjust the new bike. Any suggestions?
    >
    > -"FG Newbie" Kalukis
     
  4. Phil Brown

    Phil Brown Guest

    > I understand that double sided pedals may be a better
    > choice on a fixed gear--due to the need to get quickly
    > clipped in to a bike with no freewheel. I've got a pair
    > of Speedplay X-1's that I am ok with; seems like the
    > extra float might help while I get used to and adjust the
    > new bike. Any suggestions?

    Use what you like. I never had a problem with any pedal
    although clipless pedals of any type are much easier to use.
    Don't worry about single or double-you have plenty of time
    to get into the pedal. Phil Brown
     
  5. R15757 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Recommend Time mtb pedals/cleats, due to consistency and
    > reliability. The Speedplays may be ok as well, I have
    > never tried them.

    i also use time atac pedals on my fixed gear. mostly 'cause
    all (errr, both) my bikes use 'em. there are some advantages
    to single sided pedals on a fixed gear (eg, time cyclos) if
    you wish to say, practice such silly things as riding
    backwards or trackstands.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  6. Kinky Cowboy

    Kinky Cowboy Guest

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 02:31:53 GMT, "Kalukis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Well, my new fixed gear bike is on the way (thanks
    >Sheldon). As this is my first fixed gear, I've got more
    >than a couple of questions. The main one is, what do people
    >recommend for pedals? I'm using Look/Campy style pedals on
    >my road bike. I understand that double sided pedals may be
    >a better choice on a fixed gear--due to the need to get
    >quickly clipped in to a bike with no freewheel. I've got a
    >pair of Speedplay X-1's that I am ok with; seems like the
    >extra float might help while I get used to and adjust the
    >new bike. Any suggestions?
    >
    >-"FG Newbie" Kalukis
    >

    I'm on double sided SPDs for the sake of consistency, M515
    on my road fixie, M434 without the cage on my (fixed wheel)
    rollers bike, M515 on my singlespeed MTB, but single sided
    A535 on my fixed wheel time trial bike because I only have
    to clip in once, at the start line, so the pedal flipping
    delay is a non-issue. Look type always seemed easier to
    flip in the old days, so if I were you I'd stick with the
    Looks that you're used to. Getting clipped in fast is only
    an issue if you're in a hurry or starting on a steep
    uphill, otherwise you can just amble along with your foot
    on the wrong side of the pedal until you have time to get
    clipped in.

    Kinky Cowboy*

    *Batteries not included May contain traces of nuts Your
    milage may vary
     
  7. kalukis-<< As this is my first fixed gear, I've got more
    than a couple of questions. The main one is, what do people
    recommend for pedals? >><BR><BR>

    I switched to Speedplay Zeros as they are 'step onna bug'
    two sided entry.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  8. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    "Kalukis" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Well, my new fixed gear bike is on the way (thanks
    > Sheldon). As this is my first fixed gear, I've got more
    > than a couple of questions. The main one is, what do
    > people recommend for pedals? I'm using Look/Campy style
    > pedals on my road bike. I understand that double sided
    > pedals may be a better choice on a fixed gear--due to the
    > need to get quickly clipped in to a bike with no
    > freewheel. I've got a pair of Speedplay X-1's that I am ok
    > with; seems like the extra float might help while I get
    > used to and adjust the new bike. Any suggestions?
    >
    > -"FG Newbie" Kalukis

    A couple of weeks ago, somebody suggested these gems:

    http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/Pedal/product_22385.shtml
     
  9. Phil Holman

    Phil Holman Guest

    "Kalukis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Well, my new fixed gear bike is on the way (thanks
    > Sheldon). As this
    is my
    > first fixed gear, I've got more than a couple of
    > questions. The main
    one
    > is, what do people recommend for pedals? I'm using
    > Look/Campy style
    pedals
    > on my road bike. I understand that double sided pedals
    > may be a
    better
    > choice on a fixed gear--due to the need to get quickly
    > clipped in to a
    bike
    > with no freewheel. I've got a pair of Speedplay X-1's
    > that I am ok
    with;
    > seems like the extra float might help while I get used to
    > and adjust
    the new
    > bike. Any suggestions?

    Go with the Speedplays. I'm surprised no one mentioned pedal
    clearance through corners now that you cannot freewheel. I
    have some old Looks in my parts bin with nicely chamfered
    outer edges from that great big carborundum that passes
    beneath. This may not be an issue if you already have good
    clearance but Speedplays are also one of the easiest to get
    in and out.

    Phil Holman
     
  10. Adam Rush wrote:
    >
    >>A couple of weeks ago, somebody suggested these gems:
    >>
    >>http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/Pedal/product_22385.shtml
    >
    David L. Johnson wrote:
    >
    > IMO it's not a good idea to use platform pedals on a
    > fixed gear. You want your feet to stay on the pedals, no
    > matter what.

    I think that was a joke.

    As an aside, those are _not_, strictly speaking,
    "platform pedals" though this term has lately been widely
    misused to apply to various plain pedals that don't use
    any retention system.

    I am probably fighting a losing rear-guard action her, but
    I'd like to see the original meaning of "platform pedals"
    preserved.

    Traditional platform pedals are single-sided pedals
    intended for use _only_ with clips and straps. Instead of
    having sharp edges digging into the bottoms of your feet,
    they have a flat "platform" that is comfortable even with
    relatively soft-soled street shoes. The platform also makes
    entry into the clips easier, because your toe never bumps
    up against the front plate of the pedal, as it can with
    "rat trap" type pedals.

    Platform pedals also have a curved lip at the back of the
    pedal that makes it extra easy to flip the pedal into the
    upright position. As a result, with true platform pedals,
    entry into the toe clips is vastly easier than with
    conventional vertical-plate type metal pedals.

    Because they're single-sided, true platform pedals also give
    much better ground clearance when cornering than ordinary
    toe-clippable pedals.

    The classic platform pedal is the Lyotard Marcel
    Berthet #23, see:

    http://www.speedplay.com/pedalmuseum/images/1948Lyotard_Mar-
    cel_berthet.jpg

    Before the popularity of clipless pedals, a number of
    manufacturers made very nice platform pedals, including SR
    and Specialized. Probably the all-time best were Shimano's
    PD-T100, marketed (unsuccessrully) as a "triathlon" pedal.

    If you want to ride a fixed gear bike on the street, with
    clips and straps, platform pedals are the very best option.

    Unfortunately they're nearly extinct. As far as I know, the
    only true platform pedals currently available are the
    excellent MKS GR-9s.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/pedals.html#platform

    Sheldon "Used To Ride Platform Pedals Exclusively" Brown
    +---------------------------------------------------+
    | Even if you do learn to speak correct English, | whom
    | are you going to speak it to? | --Clarence Darrow |
    +---------------------------------------------------+ Harris
    Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX
    617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com
    http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  11. I use Shimano SPD pedals. Double sided. I've seen others use
    Look and Time road pedals. I prefer the no look step on them
    and you will get clipped in SPD. I would suggest putting on
    some platform pedals, without toeclips or straps, for your
    first brief test ride so you don't have to worry about
    getting clipped in. Or put your Look pedals on and just do a
    brief test ride with sneakers.

    "Kalukis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Well, my new fixed gear bike is on the way (thanks
    > Sheldon). As this is my first fixed gear, I've got more
    > than a couple of questions. The main one is, what do
    > people recommend for pedals? I'm using Look/Campy style
    > pedals on my road bike. I understand that double sided
    > pedals may be a better choice on a fixed gear--due to the
    > need to get quickly clipped in to a bike with no
    > freewheel. I've got a pair of Speedplay X-1's that I am ok
    > with; seems like the extra float might help while I get
    > used to and adjust the new bike. Any suggestions?
    >
    > -"FG Newbie" Kalukis
     
  12. Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Unfortunately they're nearly extinct. As far as I know, the
    >only true platform pedals currently available are the
    >excellent MKS GR-9s.

    It is easy to break off the tab at the back on these,
    however; but fortunately they can still be easily spun round
    when the tabs are gone.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  13. Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Unfortunately they're nearly extinct. As far as I know, the
    >only true platform pedals currently available are the
    >excellent MKS GR-9s.

    It is easy to break off the tab at the back on these,
    however; but fortunately they can still be easily spun round
    when the tabs are gone.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  14. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "Phil Holman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    [snip non-frightening details]

    >
    > Go with the Speedplays. I'm surprised no one mentioned
    > pedal clearance through corners now that you cannot
    > freewheel. I have some old Looks in my parts bin with
    > nicely chamfered outer edges from that great big
    > carborundum that passes beneath. This may not be an issue
    > if you already have good clearance but Speedplays are also
    > one of the easiest to get in and out.
    >
    > Phil Holman

    Dear Phil,

    Aaaargh! Somehow this aspect of fixed-gear riding had
    escaped me--you can't raise the inside pedal in a bad
    corner.

    Glad I didn't find out the hard way.

    Carl Fogel
     
  15. Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Glad I didn't find out the hard way.

    i sure did. i had a minor crash making a hard turn onto
    nicollet mall in minneapolis .. when the pedal hit the
    pavement it messed up my angle into the corner and i hit the
    curb at a little under 20mph.

    the other thing that escaped me was the real problem with
    fixed gears and pedals isn't getting into them but getting
    out of them if your preferred foot is high. you can't spin
    back to get room to twist out.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  16. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Glad I didn't find out the hard way.
    >
    > i sure did. i had a minor crash making a hard turn onto
    > nicollet mall in minneapolis .. when the pedal hit the
    > pavement it messed up my angle into the corner and i hit
    > the curb at a little under 20mph.
    >
    > the other thing that escaped me was the real problem with
    > fixed gears and pedals isn't getting into them but getting
    > out of them if your preferred foot is high. you can't spin
    > back to get room to twist out.

    Dear David,

    Ouch! Glad you're still here.

    Makes me want to stick with my plain pedals and sneakers,
    even though I once managed to ground a pedal disastrously in
    a familiar corner.

    Carl Fogel
     
  17. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 14:27:06 -0500, Sheldon Brown
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >As an aside, those are _not_, strictly speaking,
    >"platform pedals" though this term has lately been widely
    >misused to apply to various plain pedals that don't use
    >any retention system.
    >
    >I am probably fighting a losing rear-guard action her, but
    >I'd like to see the original meaning of "platform pedals"
    >preserved.
    >
    >Traditional platform pedals are single-sided pedals
    >intended for use _only_ with clips and straps. Instead of
    >having sharp edges digging

    Be a leader, Sheldon. Coin a new word for 'plain' pedals
    that is sufficiently intuitive that it will stick. We need
    something to describe pedals that are not clipless, not
    platforms, and have no retention mechanism except possibly
    the ability to add straps and clips. It needs to be as
    sticky a word as 'clipless' and 'platform' are. Do it!

    Nashbar describes them as 'caged', but I'm not entirely
    sure of the accuracy of that term, and it's also not
    sufficiently sticky.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  18. Chris B .

    Chris B . Guest

    On 08 Mar 2004 22:06:59 GMT, David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Glad I didn't find out the hard way.
    >
    >i sure did. i had a minor crash making a hard turn onto
    >nicollet mall in minneapolis .. when the pedal hit the
    >pavement it messed up my angle into the corner and i hit
    >the curb at a little under 20mph.

    On the dozen or so occasions where I have struck a pedal on
    the ground in a turn, I found that the rear wheel would just
    hop to the side opposite to the pedal, effectively
    shortening the turn. It has never caused me to crash, though
    I still try to avoid doing it.
     
  19. Chris B .

    Chris B . Guest

    On 08 Mar 2004 22:06:59 GMT, David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Glad I didn't find out the hard way.
    >
    >i sure did. i had a minor crash making a hard turn onto
    >nicollet mall in minneapolis .. when the pedal hit the
    >pavement it messed up my angle into the corner and i hit
    >the curb at a little under 20mph.

    On the dozen or so occasions where I have struck a pedal on
    the ground in a turn, I found that the rear wheel would just
    hop to the side opposite to the pedal, effectively
    shortening the turn. It has never caused me to crash, though
    I still try to avoid doing it.
     
  20. Chris B .

    Chris B . Guest

    On 08 Mar 2004 22:06:59 GMT, David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Glad I didn't find out the hard way.
    >
    >i sure did. i had a minor crash making a hard turn onto
    >nicollet mall in minneapolis .. when the pedal hit the
    >pavement it messed up my angle into the corner and i hit
    >the curb at a little under 20mph.

    On the dozen or so occasions where I have struck a pedal on
    the ground in a turn, I found that the rear wheel would just
    hop to the side opposite to the pedal, effectively
    shortening the turn. It has never caused me to crash, though
    I still try to avoid doing it.
     
Loading...
Loading...