Pedals?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Grolch, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. Grolch

    Grolch Guest

    I am looking for those pedals with the attached staps that go across
    diagonally. You just toe in to the strap and twist straight. Does anyone
    remember what they're called and / or who makes em?

    Grolsch
     
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  2. Dan B.

    Dan B. Guest

    Grolch wrote:
    > I am looking for those pedals with the attached staps that go across
    > diagonally. You just toe in to the strap and twist straight. Does anyone
    > remember what they're called and / or who makes em?
    >
    > Grolsch


    These, perhaps?

    http://powergrips.com/

    Best,

    Dan
     
  3. Grolch

    Grolch Guest

    "Dan B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Grolch wrote:
    >> I am looking for those pedals with the attached staps that go across
    >> diagonally. You just toe in to the strap and twist straight. Does anyone
    >> remember what they're called and / or who makes em?
    >>
    >> Grolsch

    >
    > These, perhaps?
    >
    > http://powergrips.com/
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Dan



    That's them! ANybody have any comments regarding these. I am currently using
    bare cages and would like a bit more security now that the weathers getting
    wetter.
     
  4. Dan B.

    Dan B. Guest

    Grolch wrote:
    > "Dan B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Grolch wrote:
    > >> I am looking for those pedals with the attached staps that go across
    > >> diagonally. You just toe in to the strap and twist straight. Does anyone
    > >> remember what they're called and / or who makes em?
    > >>
    > >> Grolsch

    > >
    > > These, perhaps?
    > >
    > > http://powergrips.com/
    > >
    > > Best,
    > >
    > > Dan

    >
    >
    > That's them! ANybody have any comments regarding these. I am currently using
    > bare cages and would like a bit more security now that the weathers getting
    > wetter.


    I've only used SPDs and Eggbeater/Candy pedals in the last few years,
    so can't provide any personal anecdotes. The PowerGrips strips are
    pretty inexpensive (~$25USD) IIRC, and should work with many platform
    pedals; it may be simplest to just buy a pair and see how it goes.

    Best,

    Dan
     
  5. DougC

    DougC Guest

    Dan B. wrote:
    > Grolch wrote:
    >> "Dan B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> Grolch wrote:
    >>>> I am looking for those pedals with the attached staps that go across
    >>>> diagonally. You just toe in to the strap and twist straight. Does anyone
    >>>> remember what they're called and / or who makes em?
    >>>>
    >>>> Grolsch
    >>> These, perhaps?
    >>>
    >>> http://powergrips.com/
    >>>
    >>> Best,
    >>>
    >>> Dan

    >>
    >> That's them! ANybody have any comments regarding these. I am currently using
    >> bare cages and would like a bit more security now that the weathers getting
    >> wetter.

    >
    > I've only used SPDs and Eggbeater/Candy pedals in the last few years,
    > so can't provide any personal anecdotes. The PowerGrips strips are
    > pretty inexpensive (~$25USD) IIRC, and should work with many platform
    > pedals; it may be simplest to just buy a pair and see how it goes.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Dan
    >

    One point with the Powergrips is that the sole of the shoe needs to be
    rather smooth for them to work well. You need to be able to turn your
    foot on the pedals, and the reason a lot of people are attracted to
    Powergrips is so that they won't need to buy "special" shoes for
    bicycle-riding--but most typical running/cross-training shoes now seem
    to have soles that are rather chunky. You can't turn your foot well
    because the tread blocks on the soles gets hung up on the edges of the
    pedals. So you might end up wanting to go buy a cheap pair of
    mall-walkers anyway. And then you're back to needing "special"
    bike-riding shoes.....
    -------
    One thing that people don't realize until they get "real" clipless
    pedals is that they are often worried about the cost of the shoes--but
    since all you do is ride in them, the shoes can last a /long/ time;
    several years at least unless you outgrow them. They won't wear out in
    3-4 months like casual shoes do if worn every day. Regular shoes get
    worn from being bent while walking and most of the time you wear riding
    shoes, you aren't walking.

    And clipless shoes aren't all expensive either, the pair I bought (3 yrs
    ago) cost $30 + shipping, and they aren't showing ANY signs of wear yet.
    ~
     
  6. Grolch ? wrote:
    > ...
    > That's them! ANybody have any comments regarding these [Power Grips]. I am currently
    > using bare cages and would like a bit more security now that the weathers getting
    > wetter.


    Power Grips versus platform pedals:

    While a low BB recumbent may be ridden with platform pedals, there is
    always the danger of having one's foot (or feet) fall off the pedals
    and contact the ground, leading to a potentially serious (bone
    fracture, ligament tears, etc.) "leg suck" injury. Foot retention
    greatly reduces this risk, and has the added advantage of allowing a
    more relaxing ride, since the rider does not consciously have to keep
    his/her feet on the pedals. Foot retention is practically mandatory on
    a bike with the BB higher than the seat.

    Power Grips versus clips and straps:

    When I want simplicity, low cost, and the ability to ride with
    non-cycling specific shoes, I use pedals with Power Grips. Power Grips
    hold the foot better than the combination of clips and straps WITHOUT
    cleated cycling shoes, do not require reaching down to the pedals to
    release one's foot, and are also much easier to get into.

    Power Grips versus clipless:

    Clipless pedals hold the foot with less play, and are better for riding
    hard/fast. There is no strap compressing the foot, which some will find
    more comfortable for longer rides.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Post Free or Die!
     
  7. Hull 697

    Hull 697 New Member

    Joined:
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    High BB, low BB, doesn't matter on long rides. Foot retention is a real safety consideration. I dumped the powergrips after my first 30 mile ride - and that is not long but was long enough for me to very nearly experience leg suck. Very minor road wrinkle and one foot just dropped right off the pedal. The rest of the ride sucked because I was paying so much attention to making sure my feet did not come loose again.

    If I had a strictly commuter bike, one ridden only in town with all the start/stop hassels, that would have powergrips. IMO that is the only use for them on a bent. Had I not been riding a high BB there is no way I could have avoided the leg suck situation. As it was, barely clipping the pavement with my heel almost knocked me off the bike.

    Comparing my powergrip experience to my BeBop experience, the clipless sandal/pedal combination is clearly more efficient. A situation that would not matter to me in the "town only" scenario but becomes very important on rural rides.

    As an aside, I do occasionally do in town chores on the bent. Wish I had a camera for the look I got the first time I pulled up to the window to pay the utility bill, ditto for drive thru bank clerk(s). Enjoyed being able to use the line, "It's a bicycle."

    Charlie
     
  8. Hull 697 wrote:
    > ...
    > High BB, low BB, doesn't matter on long rides. Foot retention is a real
    > safety consideration. I dumped the powergrips after my first 30 mile
    > ride - and that is not long but was long enough for me to very nearly
    > experience leg suck. Very minor road wrinkle and one foot just dropped
    > right off the pedal. The rest of the ride sucked because I was paying
    > so much attention to making sure my feet did not come loose again.
    >
    > If I had a strictly commuter bike, one ridden only in town with all the
    > start/stop hassels, that would have powergrips. IMO that is the only use
    > for them on a bent. Had I not been riding a high BB there is no way I
    > could have avoided the leg suck situation. As it was, barely clipping
    > the pavement with my heel almost knocked me off the bike....


    Kent Peterson used to ride recumbents on long brevets (until catching
    the fixie virus) with Power Grips (do a Google search of this group),
    and never reported any problems. Proper fitting of the strap IS
    important.

    Another alternative are heel slings which should prevent leg suck, but
    do little for pedaling efficiency.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Post Free or Die!
     
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