Performance Sunglasses

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by William O'Hara, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. If I get a pair of Perf. Sunglasses such
    as the Radial, then how do I get the prescription?

    Does anyone have op on them? Do they slide
    down a lot? Do they fog? Any vision problems
    off to the side?

    I'm back to riding and feeling stronger. I really
    think that I should get something better than
    my regular eyewear. They have always been horrible.

    bill


    --
    ---
    William O'Hara
     
    Tags:


  2. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    "William O'Hara" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > If I get a pair of Perf. Sunglasses such
    > as the Radial, then how do I get the prescription?
    >
    > Does anyone have op on them? Do they slide
    > down a lot? Do they fog? Any vision problems
    > off to the side?
    >
    > I'm back to riding and feeling stronger. I really
    > think that I should get something better than
    > my regular eyewear. They have always been horrible.
    >
    > bill
    >
    >


    You get the prescription (the slip of paper with info about what
    correction you need) from your optometrist, obviously. There are several
    ways you can get that prescription filled. You can give Performance the
    info from that prescription and they'll have the lenses cut and
    installed in the adapter. Or, you can get just the empty adapter, take
    it and your prescription to your optometrist/optician, and they'll cut
    and install the lenses for you.

    Performance charges $50 to cut and install the prescription lenses, so
    unless the lenses are covered by your insurance, that;s probably the
    cheaper route.

    The bigger issue for me, though, is that unless you wear contacts half
    the time, I don't think double-lens systemsare particularly great,
    whether they be clip-ons, over-glass goggles for skiing, or sunglasses
    with an Rx adapter. They suffer from considerable glare, especially if
    the sun's at your side, and they tend to fog between the lenses if it's
    cold out.

    I wear glasses full-time and I went to my optometrist, got a mid-level
    pair of Bolles with full-lens frames (the frames wrap all the way around
    the lens), and they popped out the regular lenses and replaced them with
    my prescription. The frames are contoured to the face, and have better
    peripheral vision than my regular glasses, and are great with both glare
    and fog.

    Like I say, unless you wear contacts a good portion of the time,
    dedicated prescription sunglasses are a far better choice than a Rx
    adapter.

    Good luck!

    -Hank
     
  3. Hank Wirtz <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "William O'Hara" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> If I get a pair of Perf. Sunglasses such
    >> as the Radial, then how do I get the prescription?
    >>
    >> Does anyone have op on them? Do they slide
    >> down a lot? Do they fog? Any vision problems
    >> off to the side?
    >>
    >> I'm back to riding and feeling stronger. I really
    >> think that I should get something better than
    >> my regular eyewear. They have always been horrible.
    >>
    >> bill
    >>
    >>

    >
    > You get the prescription (the slip of paper with info about what
    > correction you need) from your optometrist, obviously. There are

    several
    > ways you can get that prescription filled. You can give Performance the
    > info from that prescription and they'll have the lenses cut and
    > installed in the adapter. Or, you can get just the empty adapter, take
    > it and your prescription to your optometrist/optician, and they'll cut
    > and install the lenses for you.
    >
    > Performance charges $50 to cut and install the prescription lenses, so
    > unless the lenses are covered by your insurance, that;s probably the
    > cheaper route.
    >
    > The bigger issue for me, though, is that unless you wear contacts half
    > the time, I don't think double-lens systemsare particularly great,
    > whether they be clip-ons, over-glass goggles for skiing, or sunglasses
    > with an Rx adapter. They suffer from considerable glare, especially if
    > the sun's at your side, and they tend to fog between the lenses if it's
    > cold out.
    >
    > I wear glasses full-time and I went to my optometrist, got a mid-level
    > pair of Bolles with full-lens frames (the frames wrap all the way

    around
    > the lens), and they popped out the regular lenses and replaced them

    with
    > my prescription. The frames are contoured to the face, and have better
    > peripheral vision than my regular glasses, and are great with both

    glare
    > and fog.
    >
    > Like I say, unless you wear contacts a good portion of the time,
    > dedicated prescription sunglasses are a far better choice than a Rx
    > adapter.


    You are saying which I kinda thought.

    Which Bolles did you get?

    --
    ---
    William O'Hara
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 05 Aug 2005 20:27:19 -0500, "William O'Hara"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If I get a pair of Perf. Sunglasses such
    >as the Radial, then how do I get the prescription?
    >
    >Does anyone have op on them? Do they slide
    >down a lot? Do they fog? Any vision problems
    >off to the side?
    >
    >I'm back to riding and feeling stronger. I really
    >think that I should get something better than
    >my regular eyewear. They have always been horrible.


    If you need prescription glasses when riding, I'd try some clip-on
    sunglasses first. If that's not satisfactory (and in my experience,
    most clip-ons are awful, but your results may vary) then a pair of
    prescription sunglasses is a good move...but I'd shop first at a place
    that sells *glasses*. This is not without its potential for pitfalls.
    The last time I shopped for glasses, I had to visit three stores
    before I found one that was still stocking frames that carried a lens
    of reasonable size. Itty-bitty frames are "fashionable" (a word I
    have come to detest with a level of disgust previously reserved only
    for evangelists and neo-con politicians), and many stores have no
    frames that carry a useful size of lens. The upshot is that it's
    sometimes difficult to get useful glasses made at all. As for buying
    performance-oriented frames and having the lenses fitted at the local
    optical lab, don't count on that being possible. You would be amazed
    at the number of labs that now use a fitting system that is designed
    to be goof-proof and user-friendly...and in part due to the lack of
    training often given the operators of the machinery, can only be used
    to fit a lens into a frame for which they have a stored template. Thy
    *won't* have a template for frames bought elsewhere in most cases.
    (On the other hand, a *good* lab can fit them...but good labs are
    dwindling in number as the "we'll make your glasses in 17 minutes or
    less" stores grab ever more of the market share.)

    If you can find a supplier that will fill your prescription sunglass
    order by mail, that's second best. There are still fitting issues
    that may require adjustment of the lens centering which isn't noted on
    the scrip, and the frames themselves may need adjustment as well.
    That's not easily done at a distance.

    Alternate solution: Get contacts and use regular sunglasses.
    (Doesn't work for me; my prescription isn't strong enough, so I'm
    stuck with regular glasses.)
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  5. Ted Bennett

    Ted Bennett Guest

    Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 01:04:08 -0500, Hank Wirtz
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >You get the prescription (the slip of paper with info about what
    > >correction you need) from your optometrist, obviously.

    >
    > Residents of California (and possibly elsewhere) may find this
    > exceptionally difficult to obtain. My ex used to drive from Palm
    > Springs to Las Vegas to get her glasses precisely because she couldn't
    > find an optometrist in her area who would just hand her the scrip, but
    > in Nevada there was no such problem.


    Those optometrists are not in compliance with the law, which
    specifically states that prescriptions are portable, which means that a
    lens prescription must be furnished at the patient's request anytime up
    to one year after the examination.

    A simple call to the state agency which regulates optometrists will
    confirm that, and they will be interested in knowing the name of the
    practitioner who refused to do so.

    --
    Ted Bennett
     
  6. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    "William O'Hara" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > You are saying which I kinda thought.
    >
    > Which Bolles did you get?
    >


    I got the Zuma, which they no longer make, but you can get them NOS/NIB on
    ebay for $40-$60. Among current models, they resemble most the Chill or the
    Santa Marta.
     
  7. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    [email protected] wrote in news:1123351597.020077.82870
    @o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com:


    > Fogging can occur when you go through fog or go from one temperature to
    > another rapidly. Hot outside to cold inside. This morning my group
    > rode through some heavy fog off the river. My glasses were fogged up.
    > And the guy who wears regular eyeglasses, no adaptor setup like mine,
    > just regular single lens glasses, also had fog on his glasses. So
    > whether you use single lens or double lens like my adaptor, both will
    > fog.
    >
    >

    In cold weather, your own breath is the main source of fog. When cycling or
    skiing, your forward motion clears the moisture. With double-lens systems,
    the moisture is trapped between the lenses without enough airflow to clear
    the fog. Yes, if you're riding through a patch of especially moist air, any
    lens will fog on the outside, but that's far less common than your own
    exhalation being the culprit, and the space between the lenses is the
    problem.

    At least, that's been my experience.

    -Hank
     
  8. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 14:02:53 -0500, Hank Wirtz
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote in news:1123351597.020077.82870
    >@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com:
    >
    >
    >> Fogging can occur when you go through fog or go from one temperature to
    >> another rapidly. Hot outside to cold inside. This morning my group
    >> rode through some heavy fog off the river. My glasses were fogged up.
    >> And the guy who wears regular eyeglasses, no adaptor setup like mine,
    >> just regular single lens glasses, also had fog on his glasses. So
    >> whether you use single lens or double lens like my adaptor, both will
    >> fog.
    >>
    >>

    >In cold weather, your own breath is the main source of fog. When cycling or
    >skiing, your forward motion clears the moisture. With double-lens systems,
    >the moisture is trapped between the lenses without enough airflow to clear
    >the fog. Yes, if you're riding through a patch of especially moist air, any
    >lens will fog on the outside, but that's far less common than your own
    >exhalation being the culprit, and the space between the lenses is the
    >problem.
    >
    >At least, that's been my experience.
    >
    >-Hank


    I have a pair of Rudy Project Kerosene, with the Rx adapter. I ride in
    temps down to about 30f, and up to around 90f. I haven't had any
    fogging, that was extreme, or a real problem.

    I was able to get the Rx done in a progressive lense, which makes it
    easier to read the cyclocomputer and to do any roadside work. With my
    single vision, it was a problem, fixing a flat.

    The Rudy Projects are pricey, for a decent value, check out the Tifosi
    sunglasses. The Zoom with Rx adapter.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  9. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 16:38:38 GMT, Ted Bennett
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 01:04:08 -0500, Hank Wirtz
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >You get the prescription (the slip of paper with info about what
    >> >correction you need) from your optometrist, obviously.

    >>
    >> Residents of California (and possibly elsewhere) may find this
    >> exceptionally difficult to obtain. My ex used to drive from Palm
    >> Springs to Las Vegas to get her glasses precisely because she couldn't
    >> find an optometrist in her area who would just hand her the scrip, but
    >> in Nevada there was no such problem.

    >
    >Those optometrists are not in compliance with the law, which
    >specifically states that prescriptions are portable, which means that a
    >lens prescription must be furnished at the patient's request anytime up
    >to one year after the examination.
    >
    >A simple call to the state agency which regulates optometrists will
    >confirm that, and they will be interested in knowing the name of the
    >practitioner who refused to do so.


    My mistake; it was contacts, and this was back around '95. The regs
    may have changed since then. California's optometrists (or at least
    the ones who were hiding behind the reg) didn't want anyone to be able
    to get disposable contacts by mail.

    There were, however, states where the optometrist was permitted to
    dispense glasses without providing a scrip as of the last time I
    checked. Texas is *not* among them. The alleged rationale for this
    was that fitting the glasses was as important as the prescription,
    which has only very limited validity in the cases in which it applies.
    (I will note that the fashion trends which have put adjustable nose
    pads out of production at times can make fitting dicey, but this is
    not an excuse for the chicanery which unscrupulous optometrists have
    used in promoting such regs.)
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  10. On Fri, 05 Aug 2005 20:27:19 -0500 in rec.bicycles.tech, "William
    O'Hara" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If I get a pair of Perf. Sunglasses such
    > as the Radial, then how do I get the prescription?
    >

    you take the nosepiece with the frames on it that fit behind the
    wraparound lenses to whoever you get glasses from them, and they
    make lenses to fit the "diopter" frames.

    > Does anyone have op on them? Do they slide
    > down a lot? Do they fog? Any vision problems
    > off to the side?
    >

    they don't slide much, the temples use a rubber that stay in
    place. they don't fog. i can see fine to the sides, but
    remember that the corrective lenses don't wrap like the outer
    lenses.

    i think the radials are a good buy, but that the old radials were
    better than the current radial 2s. i could have done without the
    "improvements" like the vent holes. my problem was that i lose
    at least one pair of sunglssses a year.
     
Loading...
Loading...