Personal best (sort of)

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mark, Feb 15, 2004.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    BlankFor the last few days I'd been taking the bus or driving to work because I'd been working a
    series of long, late shifts. Friday I decided that the lack of exercise was getting to me, so I got
    back on the bike. Finishing work shortly after midnight, I changed into cycling clothes and headed
    home (6.5 miles, about 500 feet elevation gain). I'd cycled home a few times in 0 deg or perhaps a
    tiny bit colder, but somehow this seemed a little chillier than that. My toes were feeling the cold
    a little more sharply, exposed flesh was feeling a little colder, and the snow was squeaking quite
    loudly under my tires. When I got home and got inside and took my shoes off I felt a certain amount
    of pain in my toes as they warmed up, as if they had been on the verge of frostbite.

    The next day I spoke to a few coworkers who had thermometers in their vehicles. It turns out that
    the temperature when I left work was -13 deg F (that's -25 Celsius for you non-US readers), which
    explains why things felt a little chillier than usual. I'm sure there are people in this world who
    have cycled in colder temperatures, and I realize that there are plenty of people around (myself
    included) who have been outdoors in far colder temperatures, but I'm content to let this stand as my
    coldest bike ride ever.

    I'm beginning to understand the appeal of training stands and rollers...

    --
    mark
     
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  2. mark wrote:
    > BlankFor the last few days I'd been taking the bus or driving to work because I'd been working a
    > series of long, late shifts. Friday I decided that the lack of exercise was getting to me, so I
    > got back on the bike. Finishing work shortly after midnight, I changed into cycling clothes and
    > headed home (6.5 miles, about 500 feet elevation gain). I'd cycled home a few times in 0 deg or
    > perhaps a tiny bit colder, but somehow this seemed a little chillier than that. My toes were
    > feeling the cold a little more sharply, exposed flesh was feeling a little colder, and the snow
    > was squeaking quite loudly under my tires. When I got home and got inside and took my shoes off I
    > felt a certain amount of pain in my toes as they warmed up, as if they had been on the verge of
    > frostbite.
    >
    > The next day I spoke to a few coworkers who had thermometers in their vehicles. It turns out that
    > the temperature when I left work was -13 deg F (that's -25 Celsius for you non-US readers), which
    > explains why things felt a little chillier than usual. I'm sure there are people in this world who
    > have cycled in colder temperatures, and I realize that there are plenty of people around (myself
    > included) who have been outdoors in far colder temperatures, but I'm content to let this stand as
    > my coldest bike ride ever.
    >
    > I'm beginning to understand the appeal of training stands and rollers...

    If you have a forest around, try to go for a ride when the temperatures are similar. You'll notice
    that the temp is probably a couple of degrees warmer and since there is no asphalt you'll be going
    slower which means less windfactor etc etc. When I was a kid the old folks told us that they often
    called a forest "poor mans sweater".

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  3. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "mark" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > The next day I spoke to a few coworkers who had thermometers in their vehicles. It turns out that
    > the temperature when I left work was -13 deg F (that's -25 Celsius for you non-US readers), which
    > explains why things felt a little chillier than usual. I'm sure there are people in this world who
    > have cycled in colder temperatures, and I realize that there are plenty of people around (myself
    > included) who have been outdoors in far colder temperatures, but I'm content to let this stand as
    > my coldest bike ride ever.
    >
    > I'm beginning to understand the appeal of training stands and rollers...

    There's no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing.
     
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