photos for riding position

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Carson, Feb 26, 2003.

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  1. Carson

    Carson Guest

    I'm on my first racing/road bike. I bought it used. With my hands over the grips, I can shift fine
    -- I have Shimano STI's -- but it's a stretch to brake. When I go to brake from that position I tend
    to push the lever inwards instead of backwards for braking. I don't feel safe in that position for
    possible emergency braking. For most people in that position do they brake from that same hand
    position or do they bring their hand down to the bottom of the handle bar to brake? That's what I
    do. If you could direct me to some photos on the web I could get a better idea if I need to get a
    shorter stem (it's a 110). I've already moved the seat closer which I prefer. Thanks.
     
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  2. carson wrote:
    >
    > I'm on my first racing/road bike. I bought it used. With my hands over the grips, I can shift
    > fine -- I have Shimano STI's -- but it's a stretch to brake. When I go to brake from that
    > position I tend to push the lever inwards instead of backwards for braking. I don't feel safe in
    > that position for possible emergency braking. For most people in that position do they brake from
    > that same hand position or do they bring their hand down to the bottom of the handle bar to
    > brake? That's what I do. If you could direct me to some photos on the web I could get a better
    > idea if I need to get a shorter stem (it's a 110). I've already moved the seat closer which I
    > prefer. Thanks.

    Why not have a good local shop fit you for $50-75? Once you've been properly fit, you'll have data
    that can be useful for other purchases as well. You'll also be more comfortable from the get-go.

    Saddle front-to-rear is actually less about reach, and more about knee position. Don't adjust the
    saddle if you can't reach the bars.

    Barry
     
  3. Carson

    Carson Guest

    "one of the six billion" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Basically seat fore/aft position is about getting your knees aligned in relation to the cranks.
    > Check out this article from Colorado Cyclist on bike fit. http://www.coloradocyclist.com/bikefit/
    >

    I failed to mention my seating position was done prior to noticing the stem issue. Only after I
    first rode it on the street (I first had it on rollers) and tried to brake that I noticed it. I had
    been used to riding a mountain bike with the brakes in front. The seat's fore-aft position was
    corroborated by the above-mentioned article. Also in the same article it mentions while riding in
    the drops and glancing down your vision of hub should be blocked by handle bars. Mine isn't. A
    shorter one would do it. The stem part is tricky because you can't continually adjust it like the
    seat position, bar position. If I screw up with this stem change I'll suck it up and see a bike
    doctor. One thing I never realized until riding this bike was the power you get with these shoes and
    pedals that clip together. Wow! Thanks all.
     
  4. Carson

    Carson Guest

    On second thought I'll just keep riding it like it is for now. The "glancing down" technique isn't
    consistent. At times it's right on, etc. I was reading another article stating new road bike riders'
    backs will "stretch out" a bit after a while and need time to get accustomed to new position. Amen.
     
  5. Art Harris

    Art Harris Guest

    carson wrote:

    > I'm on my first racing/road bike. I bought it used. With my hands over the grips, I can shift
    > fine -- I have Shimano STI's -- but it's a stretch to brake. When I go to brake from that
    > position I tend to push the lever inwards instead of backwards for braking. I don't feel safe in
    > that position for possible emergency braking. For most people in that position do they brake from
    > that same hand position or do they bring their hand down to the bottom of the handle bar to
    > brake? That's what I do. If you could direct me to some photos on the web I could get a better
    > idea if I need to get a shorter stem (it's a 110). I've already moved the seat closer which I
    > prefer. Thanks.

    It would be more helpful to see a photo of YOU on the bike. ;-> But here are some pictures for you:

    http://www.bsn.com/Cycling/articles/spinachi/english.html

    I think you're saying you feel too stretched out on the bike. If that's true, then you probably ARE
    too stretched out. Since this is a used bike, it's possible it's the wrong size for you. (Remember,
    standover clearance is just one part of fit.) Just to get a rough idea, how tall are you, and what
    is the top tube length of the frame (center-to-center).

    How high are the handlebars relative to the top of the saddle? If they're very low, that could be
    part of the problem. Does the bike have dual pivot brakes? They provide more stopping power than
    single pivots for a given pressure on the levers.

    You might try re-positioning the levers *slightly* higher on the bars, and/or tilting the bars
    slightly downward (instead of parallel to the ground). Normally, a straight-edge placed along the
    bottom of the bars should just touch the bottom of the brake lever. If you brake with your hands on
    the "hooks" you will get better leverage, and will be able to brace yourself against the bars
    better. Conventional drop bars are often better than "anatomic" when it come to reaching the levers.

    Possibly the problem is that your hands are small and you're fingers can't apply enough force to the
    lever. It might help to adjust the brake cable so that the lever travels an inch or so before the
    pads contact the rim. Just be sure the levers don't "bottom out" under hard braking.

    Art Harris
     
  6. Carson

    Carson Guest

    Appreciate the help. I screwed up! The bike seat was too low to begin with which changed the whole
    other picture. I no longer have the brake problem. I was wondering though when you're in the drops
    is the position of the knees relative to elbows the same or very close for everyone? I'm really
    interested in that Colorado's site where LeMond recommends that the knees should be within an inch
    or two of the elbows in the drops. Should the elbows always be above the knees when the knees come
    up when you're in the drops? Thanks.
     
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