Pick-up truck bike carrying solutions?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Boyd Speerschne, Jan 29, 2004.

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  1. Hello,

    I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.

    I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat bed. I've been worried that
    this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.

    Other solutions have a bar which goes across the front from one side to the other like a shower
    curtain. The bar then has fork mounts on it. The only problem I have with this is that my truck has
    a topper on it; so, I'm not sure I could actually fit bikes in there with the topper on.

    Any help or words of wisdom appreciated.

    TIA,

    - Boyd S.
     
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  2. Cipher

    Cipher New Member

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    I had a pick-up a few years ago, and I bolted fork mounts to a 4' x 4' sheet of plywood which I layed in the back bed . Worked great. When I wasn't hauling the bike, I just removed the sheet of plywood with the fork mount attached to it. ;)
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 01:41:00 GMT, Boyd Speerschneider
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat bed. I've been worried that
    >this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.

    If it's a regular corrugated plastic bedliner, it doesn't protect you from corrosion except in so
    far as it protects the paint from impacts. Such bedliners sometimes _cause_ corrosion, I guess from
    trapping water underneath. In practice, it doesn't really matter.

    That said, there's no reason to worry about corrosion when cutting a hole in the liner; just be sure
    to rustproof the holes that you drill for bolts. After priming and painting the drilled holes, you
    might use silicone caulk on the holes, bolts, liberally on the underside, and as a gasket material
    under the mount.

    However...

    >Any help or words of wisdom appreciated.

    ...read the millions of threads already discussed. The poor horse is beaten to death nearly as badly
    as helmet wearing -- while the threads don't last as long, they're more frequent.

    Try searching groups.google.com with terms like bicycles pickup bicycles pickup rack bicycles
    pickup mount

    Or, if you want to see what I have to say about it, bicycles pickup onanian

    You'll find that I advocate just throwing a MTB in loose, and strapping road bikes standing upright,
    parallel or perpendicular (this may require turning the front wheel) to the truck. If you have any
    kind of ladder rack or headache rack, it takes you 20 seconds to hook one end of a strap on it and
    the other on the bike's stem (with the bike perpendicular at the front of the bed); this is very
    surprisingly secure. Otherwise, a strap or two across the bed and either hooked on the saddle rails
    or any other convenient part of the bike holds the bike standing parallel like a motorcycle.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 01:41:00 GMT, Boyd Speerschneider
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >problem I have with this is that my truck has a topper on it; so, I'm not sure I could actually fit
    >bikes in there with the topper on.

    I missed this bit in my previous reply. With the topper, if it's got any kind of strap hooks, the
    possibilities must be endless. OTOH, if you want to put a fork mount in the bed floor, you probably
    don't have to worry about corrosion (at least on top), as the topper protects the bed from the
    weather, right?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  5. Allan Butler

    Allan Butler Guest

    Boyd Speerschneider wrote:

    I have a situation almost like yours. Instead of a liner I have a bed mat that protects the floor of
    the pickup box.

    I took a piece of plywood and custom cut it to length so that it just fits between the back of the
    wheel housings and the front surface of the tailgate. Then I cut it so that it fits between the two
    side walls with minimal clearance. Now that makes a base that won't slide front to back or side to
    side and is not likely to roll over from a sudden stop.

    On top of this is a two by six bolted down so that it is a distance forward from the tailgate. This
    distance is experimental as different bike geometries cause the fork to be closesr or farther from
    the tail gate. Road bikes have to be a different distance back from mountain bikes and a different
    distance is needed for a cross bike.

    On top of the two by six I mounted two fork mount carriers. Be careful though. The top of the topper
    might not allow you to put the carriers on a two by six. It might be easier to mount the fork mount
    right to the plywood.

    In order to make mine go in and out the back of the truck I cut in about six inches from the left
    and right side all the way from the front to the back and made these "wings" foldable by installing
    hinges on them. That way it is very easy to put the carrier in the truck and take it out when it
    isn't needed.

    It really works slick except I didn't set it up to use for a cross bike. I have to add another
    carrier to carry the cross bike that belongs to my wife. When I made the original carrier I was
    single and it worked great for the bikes that I had at that time, a road bike, mountain bike and a
    tandem. The tandem just fits in the bed of my '95 S10 long bed and lets the topper close. I can get
    one finger between the brake levers and the topper door and one finger between the rear wheel of the
    tandem and the front of the truck bed. It all works real good.

    single with a tandem? Another story for someplace other than here.

    Take care and if you need to see photos of this I could e-mail them to you after I take the photos.

    Al Butler ka0ies
     
  6. Mike Wright

    Mike Wright Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 01:41:00 GMT, Boyd Speerschneider
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    >concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.
    >
    >I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat bed. I've been worried that
    >this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.
    >
    >Other solutions have a bar which goes across the front from one side to the other like a shower
    >curtain. The bar then has fork mounts on it. The only problem I have with this is that my truck has
    >a topper on it; so, I'm not sure I could actually fit bikes in there with the topper on.
    >
    >Any help or words of wisdom appreciated.
    >
    >TIA,
    >
    >- Boyd S.

    I bolted fork mounts to a 2x4 which I cut to fit snuggly into the notches that are on the sides of
    my truck bed. This carrier is easy to drop in when needed and remove when not. This was quite cheap
    to build. I can't comment on the topper issue, however.
     
  7. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    > concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.
    >
    > I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat
    bed.
    > I've been worried that this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.

    A 2x4/2x6 lattice. Slides into the bed liner grooves, which are, coincidentally, exactly the right
    size for a 2x4. Spacing to hold the bikes back wheel. Bungie cord ( and lock) to hold it steady.
    Simple, cheap, easily removable if necessary, no need to remove the front wheel.

    I'd link up a picture, but the bed is currently full of snow...:)

    Pete
     
  8. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 01:41:00 GMT, Boyd Speerschneider
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    >concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.
    >
    >I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat bed. I've been worried that
    >this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.

    It would, in my personal opiniion, be better to cut a piece of 3/4" plywood in the proper shape to
    fit in the bed ahead of the wheel wells (so that it won't be able to slide around) and then put the
    fork mounts on that. This allows the mounts to be quickly and easily removable from the truck, and
    doesn't scar the liner or bed at all.

    There are other, similar lash-ups possible from a variety of materials.

    Alternately, since you say that the truck has a topper, could you not just bungee the bikes to the
    sides of the bed, using pieces of pipe insulation on the frame to prevent rubs?

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Boyd Speerschneider wrote:
    > I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    > concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.
    >
    > I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat bed. I've been worried that
    > this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.
    >
    > Other solutions have a bar which goes across the front from one side to the other like a shower
    > curtain. The bar then has fork mounts on it. The only problem I have with this is that my truck
    > has a topper on it; so, I'm not sure I could actually fit bikes in there with the topper on.

    Some riders bolt the fork mounts to a piece of wood and just lay that in the bed. It needn't be
    large to keep a bike up.

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  10. Tommy Taylor

    Tommy Taylor Guest

    > I'd like to hear from you all concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike
    > hauling systems for pick-ups.

    I keep either a road bike or mtn bike in the back of a truck (with camper shell). The bike is on its
    side with one bungee through the rear wheel hooked to the right rear cargo hook of the bed.
     
  11. Boyd-<< I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.
    >><BR><BR>

    Get a couple of fork mounts and mount them to a piece of wood or something that you could slide into
    the truck bed, then attach the forks to. I think there actually is such a thing...Call Bobby at
    Rocky Mounts in Boulder, he knows all things bike rack

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  12. Frank Knox

    Frank Knox Guest

    "Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    > concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.
    >
    > I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat
    bed.
    > I've been worried that this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.
    >
    > Other solutions have a bar which goes across the front from one side to
    the
    > other like a shower curtain. The bar then has fork mounts on it. The
    only
    > problem I have with this is that my truck has a topper on it; so, I'm not sure I could actually
    > fit bikes in there with the topper on.
    >
    > Any help or words of wisdom appreciated.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > - Boyd S.
    I cut plywood to fit the bed. Near the back are 3 fork mounts. On the cab end are some short 2x2's
    screwed to the plywood to prevent the back wheels from slipping. This system doesn't damage the
    truck and allows convenient removal when I am not hauling bikes.
     
  13. My friend has a big ford truck.

    he used 2x4's to make a frame which lies flat on the bed... just the weight of the structure holds
    it in place.. no screws/bolts.

    then he has 4 sets of two 2x4's about 1 1/2 tire widths apart.

    to load.. drop the tail gate, roll the bikes on (with both wheels on) into the grooves so the front
    wheels touch the front of the bed. They will stand that way long enough for the tie down procedure.

    a long strap.. tie one end to a hook the side panel.. wrap it around the seat post of each bike and
    then cinch it to the opposite side panel. we travel long and short distances with this rig.. it is
    very, very quick to load/unload. as quick as i can put my bike on the car top carrier. And it is
    extremely secure.

    charlie
     
  14. Eric M

    Eric M Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Boyd Speerschneider <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Hello,
    >
    >I recently purchased a pick-up truck (2000 Nissan Frontier). I'd like to hear from you all
    >concerning your wisdom and experience concerning different bike hauling systems for pick-ups.

    I'm on my fourth truck.

    >I've considered just gettting fork mounts and bolting them to the flat bed. I've been worried that
    >this might render the bed liner useless and cause a bunch of corrosion.

    If you have a shell on it, the liner shouldn't get wet. You could just glop silicone seal around
    the mounts.

    But bolting mounts to the bed will make the bed less useful for hauling heavy non-bicycle objects.

    >Other solutions have a bar which goes across the front from one side to the other like a shower
    >curtain. The bar then has fork mounts on it.

    I've used these, both ones I made myself with a 2x4 and fork mounts and a turnbuckle to an eyebolt
    in the bed, and the fancy hydraulic kind. They work well.

    >The only problem I have with this is that my truck has a topper on it; so, I'm not sure I could
    >actually fit bikes in there with the topper on.

    Depends on how high your shell is and how tall you are. With the truck I put a shell on, I just lay
    my bikes in the back on carpeting and put an old blanket between bikes when I was hauling more than
    one. Never scratched or damaged a bike.

    Eric
     
  15. Do you have a removeable bed liner (preferably thick plastic)?

    Here's what I did. Ibought some fork mounts and bolted them to a 1x3 oak plank and drilled a hole at
    either end.

    I then polyurethaned it for weather resistance, then drilled two matching holes in the plastic
    bedliner and pushed some T-nuts up through the bottom, and bolted the rack into the T-bolts.

    When I njeed to remove the rack, i unbolt it, and thread a shorter bolt to seal the holes and keep
    the Tbolts from shaking lose.

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  16. Bill

    Bill Guest

    snip>
    > Some riders bolt the fork mounts to a piece of wood and just lay that in the bed. It needn't be
    > large to keep a bike up.
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
    >
    Don't need to drill any holes. For mtbsI use a piece of 2x6 with fork mounts bolted to it, just lay
    in the bed, easy in and out. The 2x6 is wide enough to angle the mounts so you can overlap mtb bars
    and squeeze in an extra bike. A short bungee to each corner keeps it in place. No need to worry
    about securing the rear unless you're seriously off road. With the cap you can put it in the rear
    of the bed and not have to crawl in to secure the bikes. Use two boards and you can stagger bikes
    front to back.

    Another solution that I like better is an old roof rack front bar assembly bolted to lengths of 2x2
    about 3 ft long to each of the roof mount pads (Yakima no new holes required). Long bungee corner to
    corner to stabilize, the wood strips fit between the wheel wells and butt against the front of the
    bed so that distance can be controlled. Drop the front wheels between the bar and the front of the
    bed, hook that long bungee over the axel and everything stays put. Out of the truck in 30 seconds
    with no holes to drill.

    Bill Brannon
     
  17. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Eric M wrote:

    > I just lay my bikes in the back on carpeting and put an old blanket between bikes when I was
    > hauling more than one. Never scratched or damaged a bike.

    This has always been my solution -- in pickup trucks, and the backs of cars. No problems. Plus the
    bikes are partially hidden, for security's sake. If you don't have suitable blankets, one or two
    heavy canvas dropcloths from Home Depot or Lowe's will work fabulously. Lay it out, lay one bike on
    it, fold it over, then lay the other bike on top of that. The weight and drag of another dropcloth
    laid over that will keep everything in place, as well as hidden from view. Better than carpet for
    keeping stuff from sliding around is that rubber mesh stuff to put under rugs, to keep them from
    sliding around. Dropcloths and rubber mesh pack a lot smaller than carpet/blankets too.

    Matt O.
     
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