picking a long distance path



A

Amy Radcliff

Guest
I am planning to go walking in the UK and would be extremely appreciative if anyone could offer
comments and suggestions on picking the right route.

I have walked the Cotswold Way (all of it) and have made numerous other full day walks. I want to go
with my husband on another long distance walk...the first and main criteria is that it not be too
difficult--we managed the Cotswold Way without great trouble, but I don't want to do anything more
strenuous than that, and to be honest, hopefully a little less demanding. In looking obvious at
possibilities, I see the Thames Path, the Ridge Way, the South Downs and North Downs paths. Any
other obvious options? And in any case, which would be best?

I realize best is a hard word to define...aside from hoping to find good pubs with quality real ale
(seriously, one of the reasons I love Britain is real ale), I don't have any strong preferences
about what a good way entails.

One other thing, if I may. I have done the easy bits of some more difficult paths--I particularly
adored part of the Pembrokeshire Path near St. David, and while I have not walked it, I am intrigued
by the South West Coast path. Question: do these, or any other more dramatic of the long distance
paths, lend themselves to picking easy portions? By this I mean, walking for a whole day from place
A to B, catching a cab from B to C to skip very strenuous walking, and then spending another day
going from C to D, and so on...that is, at least a whole day walking then taking a cab (rather than
walking a few hours then taking a cab). Would this be something considering (and any suggestions?)
or would I better off doing an easier long distance path and just walking it from start to finish? I
like the integrity of doing the walk without resorting to taxis, but then, I'm not religious on that
point and would be willing to do it if it meant much better walking overall.

In total, I wanted to spend 10 days or two weeks walking.

Again, any comments gratefully received.

Many thanks Amy
 
S

Scott Leckey

Guest
The Peddars Way & Norfolk Coast Path?

http://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/peddarsway/index.htm

"amy radcliff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> I am planning to go walking in the UK and would be extremely appreciative if anyone could offer
> comments and suggestions on picking the right route.
>
> I have walked the Cotswold Way (all of it) and have made numerous other full day walks. I want to
> go with my husband on another long distance walk...the first and main criteria is that it not be
> too difficult--we managed the Cotswold Way without great trouble, but I don't want to do anything
> more strenuous than that, and to be honest, hopefully a little less demanding. In looking obvious
> at possibilities, I see the Thames Path, the Ridge Way, the South Downs and North Downs paths. Any
> other obvious options? And in any case, which would be best?
>
> I realize best is a hard word to define...aside from hoping to find good pubs with quality real
> ale (seriously, one of the reasons I love Britain is real ale), I don't have any strong
> preferences about what a good way entails.
>
> One other thing, if I may. I have done the easy bits of some more difficult paths--I particularly
> adored part of the Pembrokeshire Path near St. David, and while I have not walked it, I am
> intrigued by the South West Coast path. Question: do these, or any other more dramatic of the long
> distance paths, lend themselves to picking easy portions? By this I mean, walking for a whole day
> from place A to B, catching a cab from B to C to skip very strenuous walking, and then spending
> another day going from C to D, and so on...that is, at least a whole day walking then taking a cab
> (rather than walking a few hours then taking a cab). Would this be something considering (and any
> suggestions?) or would I better off doing an easier long distance path and just walking it from
> start to finish? I like the integrity of doing the walk without resorting to taxis, but then, I'm
> not religious on that point and would be willing to do it if it meant much better walking overall.
>
> In total, I wanted to spend 10 days or two weeks walking.
>
> Again, any comments gratefully received.
>
> Many thanks Amy
 
S

Steve Jones

Guest
> One other thing, if I may. I have done the easy bits of some more difficult paths--I particularly
> adored part of the Pembrokeshire Path near St. Davids Question: do these, or any other more
> dramatic of the long distance paths, lend themselves to picking easy portions? By this I mean,
> walking for a whole day from place A to B, catching a cab from B to C to skip very strenuous
> walking, and then spending another day going from C to D, and so on...that is, at least a whole
> day walking then taking a cab (rather than walking a few hours then taking a cab). Would this be
> something considering (and any suggestions?)

The whole of the north of the Pembrokeshire Coast Path has frequent summer bus services which pick
up and drop off at any point you wish. Visit
www.pembrokeshirecoast.org.uk/coast_2_coast_2003/wwwroot/english/transport/main.asp for details. The
advantage of this is that you can set up a base and easily reach your next portion of the path.

Some parts of the path are strenuous, especially in the North, more so sometimes than many upland
walks as they have frequent sharp ups and downs. The paths to the south of the county are generally
much easier and have some fabulous beaches and cliffs (but also lots of holidaymakers). My favourite
areas are in the north where to go with the grand coastal scenery, one is often treated to solitude
and sightings of seals and dolphins.

If you want easy I can only suggest the North or South Downs Way. Being well polulated, public
transport should'nt be a problem. Not done them myself, I think I'll wait until rheumatism sets in.

Steve Jones
 
J

John Taverner

Guest
The PCP, has these summer shuttles, as mentioned.

I am biased of course. PCP has everything, in May and June, stunning flowers, and birds. My fave
parts are Strumble to St Davids. Marloes and Dale. Angle to Freshwater Manorbier, I am doing
Strumble on Friday, the forecast is good and the dog already to go.

--
John Taverner Llangwm Pembrokeshire Wales 3m amsl "et in arcadia ego?"
 
K

Katherine

Guest
amy radcliff wrote:

> I am planning to go walking in the UK and would be extremely appreciative if anyone could offer
> comments and suggestions on picking the right route.
>
> I have walked the Cotswold Way (all of it) and have made numerous other full day walks. I want to
> go with my husband on another long distance walk...the first and main criteria is that it not be
> too difficult--we managed the Cotswold Way without great trouble, but I don't want to do anything
> more strenuous than that, and to be honest, hopefully a little less demanding. In looking obvious
> at possibilities, I see the Thames Path, Again, any comments gratefully received.
>
> Many thanks Amy
>
>
Take a look at the Thames path at this site:

http://www.fellwalk.co.uk It is flat, goes through various points of interest: Oxford, William
Morris' home, etc. and is close to towns and transportation.

Katherine
 
B

Bob Mannix

Guest
"Katherine" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> amy radcliff wrote:
>
> > I am planning to go walking in the UK and would be extremely appreciative if anyone could offer
> > comments and suggestions on picking the right route.
> >
> > I have walked the Cotswold Way (all of it) and have made numerous other full day walks. I want
> > to go with my husband on another long distance walk...the first and main criteria is that it not
> > be too difficult--we managed the Cotswold Way without great trouble, but I don't want to do
> > anything more strenuous than that, and to be honest, hopefully a little less demanding. In
> > looking obvious at possibilities, I see the Thames Path, Again, any comments gratefully
> > received.
> >
> > Many thanks Amy
> >
> >
> Take a look at the Thames path at this site:
>

Hmm, maybe I'm biased, living a mile from the Thames path, but it's a bit, well, boring (after about
an hour). You can't see much apart from the river (usually). It can also get very muddy in wet
weather in parts. It is definitely flat though and close to "civilisation" at regular intervals!

--
Bob Mannix (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
 
R

Reid

Guest
Following up to amy radcliff

> In looking obvious at possibilities, I see the Thames Path,

It is the easiest! Problems are cost of London accommodation and lack of "wildness" if that
is an issue.
--
Mike Reid Drinking the Thames path "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/thames.htm"
 
R

Reid

Guest
Following up to amy radcliff

>I realize best is a hard word to define...aside from hoping to find good pubs with quality real ale
>(seriously, one of the reasons I love Britain is real ale), I don't have any strong preferences
>about what a good way entails.

Missed that bit, Thames is as good as any for bitter IMHO. Do you know London, Amy? Great views of
London sights as you go through. BTW the guide does it Source to Barrier, an approach I strongly
disagree with. If you want all "country", Windsor to source is a week with a train back.

--
Mike Reid Drinking the Thames path "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/thames.htm"
 
C

Chris Street

Guest
On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 03:36:25 GMT, amy radcliff
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>I am planning to go walking in the UK and would be extremely appreciative if anyone could offer
>comments and suggestions on picking the right route.
>
>I have walked the Cotswold Way (all of it) and have made numerous other full day walks. I want to
>go with my husband on another long distance walk...the first and main criteria is that it not be
>too difficult--we managed the Cotswold Way without great trouble, but I don't want to do anything
>more strenuous than that, and to be honest, hopefully a little less demanding. In looking obvious
>at possibilities, I see the Thames Path, the Ridge Way, the South Downs and North Downs paths. Any
>other obvious options? And in any case, which would be best?
>
>I realize best is a hard word to define...aside from hoping to find good pubs with quality real ale
>(seriously, one of the reasons I love Britain is real ale), I don't have any strong preferences
>about what a good way entails.
>
>One other thing, if I may. I have done the easy bits of some more difficult paths--I particularly
>adored part of the Pembrokeshire Path near St. David, and while I have not walked it, I am
>intrigued by the South West Coast path. Question: do these, or any other more dramatic of the long
>distance paths, lend themselves to picking easy portions? By this I mean, walking for a whole day
>from place A to B, catching a cab from B to C to skip very strenuous walking, and then spending
>another day going from C to D, and so on...that is, at least a whole day walking then taking a cab
>(rather than walking a few hours then taking a cab). Would this be something considering (and any
>suggestions?) or would I better off doing an easier long distance path and just walking it from
>start to finish? I like the integrity of doing the walk without resorting to taxis, but then, I'm
>not religious on that point and would be willing to do it if it meant much better walking overall.
>
>In total, I wanted to spend 10 days or two weeks walking.
>
>Again, any comments gratefully received.

Heart of England Way is semi official and marked on the newest OS maps only.

http://www.jbutler.org.uk/e2e/hoe/ http://www.heartofenglandway.org/

Close to the urban centres but the walk is more or less entirely rural in character - few hills but
quite gentle ones.

Grand Union canal walk with an excellent website

http://www.waterscape.com/waterwaysguide/waterways/Grand_Union_Canal/Grand_Union_Canal.html

I'm biased as I live 20 yards away from it of course but it's very reasonably flat being a canal and
has excellent pubs etc as narrowboaters also tend to like a good ale now and then, and accomodataion
is easy enough to find. If you want to go walking it's an interesting mix of urban and countryside -
tap me for some details of pubs and accomodation around Warwick if you need any more info.

>
>Many thanks Amy

--
79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot. The other 42% are made up later on. In Warwick -
looking at flat fields and that includes the castle.
 
I

Ian Dainty

Guest
"Bob Mannix" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> Hmm, maybe I'm biased, living a mile from the Thames path, but it's a bit, well, boring (after
> about an hour). You can't see much apart from the river (usually). It can also get very muddy in
> wet weather in parts. It is definitely flat though and close to "civilisation" at regular
> intervals!

I walked it from the Thames Barrier to Chertsey. That took two days at a fast pace. I quite enjoyed
it. You can get boats to transport you upstream if you don't want to be too religiously completist
about it. A pretty good pub walk I'd say.

Ian.

--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
 
J

John Williams

Guest
amy radcliff <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
. In looking obvious at
> possibilities, I see the Thames Path, the Ridge Way, the South Downs and North Downs paths. Any
> other obvious options? And in any case, which would be best?

The Ridgeway is a good walk, very enjoyable and with a bit of ancient history thrown in. The western
half is generally easy hill top walking. It's hillier where it follows the Chiltern Hills between
Wallingford and Ivinghoe, but nothing too strenuous.
 
A

Amy Radcliff

Guest
just to say thank you to everyone for taking the time to offer comments (though more are of course
more than welcome).

On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 03:36:25 GMT, amy radcliff <[email protected]> wrote:

>
>I am planning to go walking in the UK and would be extremely appreciative if anyone could offer
>comments and suggestions on picking the right route.
>
>I have walked the Cotswold Way (all of it) and have made numerous other full day walks. I want to
>go with my husband on another long distance walk...the first and main criteria is that it not be
>too difficult--we managed the Cotswold Way without great trouble, but I don't want to do anything
>more strenuous than that, and to be honest, hopefully a little less demanding. In looking obvious
>at possibilities, I see the Thames Path, the Ridge Way, the South Downs and North Downs paths. Any
>other obvious options? And in any case, which would be best?
>
>I realize best is a hard word to define...aside from hoping to find good pubs with quality real ale
>(seriously, one of the reasons I love Britain is real ale), I don't have any strong preferences
>about what a good way entails.
>
>One other thing, if I may. I have done the easy bits of some more difficult paths--I particularly
>adored part of the Pembrokeshire Path near St. David, and while I have not walked it, I am
>intrigued by the South West Coast path. Question: do these, or any other more dramatic of the long
>distance paths, lend themselves to picking easy portions? By this I mean, walking for a whole day
>from place A to B, catching a cab from B to C to skip very strenuous walking, and then spending
>another day going from C to D, and so on...that is, at least a whole day walking then taking a cab
>(rather than walking a few hours then taking a cab). Would this be something considering (and any
>suggestions?) or would I better off doing an easier long distance path and just walking it from
>start to finish? I like the integrity of doing the walk without resorting to taxis, but then, I'm
>not religious on that point and would be willing to do it if it meant much better walking overall.
>
>In total, I wanted to spend 10 days or two weeks walking.
>
>Again, any comments gratefully received.
>
>Many thanks Amy
 
N

Nick Kew

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (John Williams) writes:

> The Ridgeway is a good walk,

You mean they've got rid of all the 4x4s that turn it into a motorway with added mud? Or do you love
the aroma of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and particle emissions?

--
Nick Kew
 
S

Steve Watson

Guest
R

Reid

Guest
Following up to Nick Kew

>> The Ridgeway is a good walk,
>
>You mean they've got rid of all the 4x4s that turn it into a motorway with added mud? Or do you
>love the aroma of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and particle emissions?

Exaggeration, I think I saw 1, maybe 2 vehicles when I did the Ridgeway.
--
Mike Reid "Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso Walking, Wasdale, Thames path, London
etc "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site Spain, food and walking "http://www.fell-
walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
 
R

Reid

Guest
Following up to Steve Watson

>Being a Northerner I might be biased,

Surely that has never happened :)

Of course the north has the best walking, (if harder though) but that foam on the beer? Tut, tut.
--
Mike Reid "Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso Walking, Wasdale, Thames path, London
etc "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site Spain, food and walking "http://www.fell-
walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
 
K

Katherine

Guest
amy radcliff wrote:

> just to say thank you to everyone for taking the time to offer comments (though more are of course
> more than welcome).
>

Do let us know what you decided on and how it went.

Katherine
 
J

John Williams

Guest
[email protected] (Nick Kew) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> (John Williams) writes:
>
> > The Ridgeway is a good walk,
>
> You mean they've got rid of all the 4x4s that turn it into a motorway with added mud? Or do you
> love the aroma of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and particle emissions?

That wasn't my experience, and I'd like to see a 4x4 negotiate the Chiltern half!