'Pillows From Heaven'

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Bob, Apr 3, 2004.

  1. Bob

    Bob Guest

    or recipe from Hell?

    /abcnews.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    1.html
     
    Tags:


  2. BOB wrote:
    > or recipe from Hell?
    >
    > bcnews.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    > 1.html
    >
    >

    Did you get the idea from the article that the whole
    magazine was an April Fool's edition or just that one
    recipe?

    --Lia
     
  3. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 3 Apr 2004 22:05:52 -0500, " BOB" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >or recipe from Hell?
    >
    >abcnews.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    >1.html

    This reminds me of the recipe for fried chicken that Jill
    posted a week or two ago: "Heat the frying oil. When water
    sizzles in the oil, it's ready.".

    What possibly culinary advantage could be achieved by
    boiling water and shortening for 5 minutes? Absolutely
    nothing. The recipe is certainly suspicious, it being the
    April 1st issue 'n all.

    -sw
     
  4. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-04-04, Julia Altshuler <[email protected]> wrote:
    > BOB wrote:
    >> or recipe from Hell?

    Wow! That's the most fun since strawberry poptarts in the
    toaster. ;)

    nb
     
  5. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    BOB wrote:
    > bcnews.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    > 1.html

    "L E W I S V I L L E, Texas, April 1..."

    Enough said. Even without looking at the flames inserted by
    Photoshop I know where this story came from.

    --
    John Gaughan http://www.johngaughan.net/
    [email protected]
     
  6. Cathy

    Cathy Guest

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 03:26:57 GMT, Julia Altshuler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > BOB wrote:
    >> or recipe from Hell?
    >>
    >> cnews.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    >> 1.html
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >Did you get the idea from the article that the whole
    >magazine was an April Fool's edition or just that one
    >recipe?
    >
    >--Lia
    Um, if you go to the Southern Living website
    (southernliving.com) they've got a disclaimer and warning
    on the front page to not use the recipe on page 154 for
    "Icebox Rolls".

    Granted, that could be part of an April Fools joke, but the
    surest way to tell is to check a copy of the April issue of
    SL and see if the recipe does indeed appear on page 154 with
    the allegedly dangerous directions. If it does, it's no
    prank, but a potentially serious, if not deadly, mistake.

    Cathy
     
  7. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 06:43:43 GMT, cathy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Granted, that could be part of an April Fools joke, but
    >the surest way to tell is to check a copy of the April
    >issue of SL and see if the recipe does indeed appear on
    >page 154 with the allegedly dangerous directions. If it
    >does, it's no prank, but a potentially serious, if not
    >deadly, mistake.

    The story is real - they did publish it. What was probably a
    joke was the person who submitted it. It's be interesting to
    see the context in which it was published - reader
    submission, or part of a more credible article?

    Like I said - there is no culinary advantage of boiling lard
    and water for 5 minutes. Heck, even the name of the recipe
    is suspicious (liek: prepare to die - now I lay me down to
    sleep - if I die before I wake.., etc..).

    "Pillows from heaven" is commonly used to describe ravioli,
    not dinner rolls, FWIW.

    -sw
     
  8. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    cathy wrote:

    > Granted, that could be part of an April Fools joke, but
    > the surest way to tell is to check a copy of the April
    > issue of SL and see if the recipe does indeed appear on
    > page 154 with the allegedly dangerous directions. If it
    > does, it's no prank, but a potentially serious, if not
    > deadly, mistake.

    Why would a recipe call for simmering fat and water? Is
    there any method to this madness? blacksalt
     
  9. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:
    >
    > On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 06:43:43 GMT, cathy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Granted, that could be part of an April Fools joke, but
    > >the surest way to tell is to check a copy of the April
    > >issue of SL and see if the recipe does indeed appear on
    > >page 154 with the allegedly dangerous directions. If it
    > >does, it's no prank, but a potentially serious, if not
    > >deadly, mistake.
    >
    > The story is real - they did publish it. What was probably
    > a joke was the person who submitted it. It's be
    > interesting to see the context in which it was published -
    > reader submission, or part of a more credible article?
    >
    > Like I said - there is no culinary advantage of boiling
    > lard and water for 5 minutes. Heck, even the name of the
    > recipe is suspicious (liek: prepare to die - now I lay me
    > down to sleep - if I die before I wake.., etc..).
    >
    > "Pillows from heaven" is commonly used to describe
    > ravioli, not dinner rolls, FWIW.
    >
    > -sw

    "Angel biscuits", a kind of cross between a baking soda
    biscuit and a yeasted roll sounds a bit like "pillows from
    heaven". I recall getting these in New York. In my mind I
    associated them with Southern blacks. blacksalt yes, I know
    this is probably the PC term dejour, but the blacks I know
    call themselves that, just as the (American) Indians I know
    call themselves Indians.
     
  10. Dan Levy

    Dan Levy Guest

    "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Like I said - there is no culinary advantage of boiling
    > lard and water for 5 minutes.

    Well...if it's lard, such an operation could plausibly be
    intended to deodorize the lard. Freshly melted lard,
    especially if it has a little age to it, smells like a hog
    rendering plant.

    BUT... Southern Living, who boasts of their test kitchens,
    has NO EXCUSE not to have tested the recipe unless they,
    too, were in on the April Fool.
     
  11. Dan Levy

    Dan Levy Guest

    "John Gaughan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > BOB wrote:
    > > news.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    > > 1.html
    >
    > "L E W I S V I L L E, Texas, April 1..."
    >
    > Enough said. Even without looking at the flames inserted
    > by Photoshop I know where this story came from.

    The flames appear to be coming from what looks like a camp
    stove burner (or hotplate? it's hard to tell, except I can't
    see any electric cord) beneath the pot. What appears to have
    happened is the heat was cranked up high and the hot fat,
    propelled by violently boiling water beneath it, ran over
    onto the burner and there it heated up further until it
    reached its flash point (hot enough to smoke -- more than
    200 degrees Fahrenheit over the boiling point of water) and
    THEN ignited.

    An attentive cook, using low heat and constantly watching
    the saucepan, would be unlikely to experience a problem.
    I've had pasta water pots to which cooking oil had been
    poured, boil over onto both gas and electric coil burners
    with nary a fire, only a messy burner which was a pain to
    clean. But a novice, simply reading that it is to be boiled
    and so puts the pot on a burner turned to maximum heat and
    leaves it while distracted by other kitchen tasks, could be
    in for a rude surprise.
     
  12. When I read this article

    >> cnews.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    >> 1.html

    I got the idea it was an April Fool joke and couldn't figure
    out whose.

    Yesterday I saw a short notice about recalling the magazine
    in my local newspaper. From that, I got the idea that it has
    nothing to do with April Fool and that it was a plain
    mistake from an incompetent chef or copy editor. The
    directions were supposed to read that one pours boiling
    water over the lard away from the heat source. That would
    effectively melt the lard and not be dangerous. When they're
    boiled together, the fat rises to the top, and the water
    boils from underneath causing explosions of hot fat which
    stick and burn when coming into contact with people.

    Next question: Does the recalled magazine (I don't
    subscribe) become a collector's edition worth triple the
    price and sold on ebay?

    --Lia
     
  13. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    BOB wrote:
    > or recipe from Hell?
    >
    > bcnews.go.com/sections/GMA/Living/exploding_recipe_040401-
    > 1.html

    How funny! I'm glad I've only been tempted to try a couple
    of recipes from Southern Living and that was NOT one of
    them. However, I did not get a postcard from them stating
    this recipe was dangerous.

    Jill
     
  14. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    kalanamak wrote:
    > Steve Wertz wrote:
    >>
    >> On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 06:43:43 GMT, cathy
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Granted, that could be part of an April Fools joke, but
    >>> the surest way to tell is to check a copy of the April
    >>> issue of SL

    >> The story is real - they did publish it. What was
    >> probably a joke was the person who submitted it.
    (snip blethering)

    > "Angel biscuits", a kind of cross between a baking soda
    > biscuit and a yeasted roll sounds a bit like "pillows from
    > heaven". I recall getting these in New York. In my mind I
    > associated them with Southern blacks. blacksalt yes, I
    > know this is probably the PC term dejour, but the blacks I
    > know call themselves that, just as the (American) Indians
    > I know call themselves Indians.

    Funny, I'll have to ask the blacks where I work if they call
    themselves "Southern Blacks". Somehow, I don't think so ;)
    But then again, I seem to know more about black history and
    heritage than they do. Case in point: I attended a black
    wedding where they 'jumped the broom' as part of the
    ceremony. Come to find out they had no idea where that idea
    came from, they just did it because the wedding planner and
    her mother said that's the way it's done.

    Angel biscuits, in my recollection have baking soda but also
    a bit of cream of tartar in them to make them rise higher,
    sort of like scones.

    Jill
     
  15. Barry Grau

    Barry Grau Guest

    kalanamak <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > "Angel biscuits", a kind of cross between a baking soda
    > biscuit and a yeasted roll sounds a bit like "pillows from
    > heaven". I recall getting these in New York. In my mind I
    > associated them with Southern blacks.

    Southerners yes, I don't know about specifically Southern
    blacks. The first place I saw the recipe was in Bill Neal's
    "Biscuits, Spoonbread and Sweet Potato Pie," which, as you
    may guess, is about southern baking. I think they're also
    called "Bride's biscuits," from which, If I remember right,
    Neal guesses that the combinaiton of baking powder and yeast
    may have been a form of insurance.

    > blacksalt yes, I know this is probably the PC term dejour,
    > but the blacks I know call themselves that, just as the
    > (American) Indians I know call themselves Indians.

    -bwg
     
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