Pinarello Angliru - any comments?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by janiejones, Apr 17, 2007.

  1. janiejones

    janiejones New Member

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    I have been investigating new bikes and the Pinarello Angliru seems pretty good value - the Campag setup model.

    Anyone have any views.
     
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  2. Unbelievably

    Unbelievably New Member

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    IMO, heavy frame for aluminium...:(
     
  3. KellyT

    KellyT New Member

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    It's not an all italian Pinarello. Basically a bike built in the East and badged as Pinarello, for a bit of a premium obviously.

    If the badge bothers you that much then, whatever. But if it's only value that your bothered about, I'd say Trek, Bianchi, Giant, could all give you more actual bike for your money, with a bit less badge.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    If I were looking for a "new" bike, then I would also put the Pinarello Angliru (amongst some other bikes) on my short list ... if an LBS carried Pinarello, that is.

    FWIW. The notion that a bike which weighs in at around 20 lb. bike is now considered to be heavy is a bit disturbing ...

    FWIW2. The notion that the Pinarello Angliru is less of a Pinarello because it is fabricated outside of Italy is also a bit troubling IF ONE PRESUMES that the frame has been fabricated to the specs of the folk at Pinarello (this is true for the "new" Colnago whose frame is fabricated outside of Italy, IMO) ... unless one is a bike snob because once you get away from a lugged steel frame, the craftsmanship should less frequently be a factor in assessing a frame than in the now-distant past (oh sure, I've seen how nice MOOTS & WATERFORD frames are TIG welded).

    OKAY, OKAY ... the Angliru does NOT have the curved stays or curved fork blades ... since I haven't ridden any of those frames, I'm not sure how much they actually change the ride ... are those curved stays & fork blades what defines a Pinarello, now? Is it the M.O.ST bottom bracket?

    If the Angliru handles the way its Italian half-brothers/-sisters/cousins handle, then the weight penalty of the off-the-shelf stays & fork and probably-robotic welding would be acceptable trade-offs (to me) for the sizeabe cost savings.

    If the Angliru doesn't handle differently than a Motobecane, then ...

    BTW. This is not the same as looking at a current Motobecane and suggesting it is not the same as one which was made in France a couple of dozen years ago -- if a Motobecane were still made in France, it also would not be like one which had been made a couple of dozen years ago, either ... and, there is a reason that most French components fell out of favor in the marketplace ... a credit to MAVIC's marketing department, mostly, and their engineers (of course) that they still exist.

    And, as a further tangential note, I must observe that (several years ago) one issue of BICYCLING magazine reviewed both a "new" Motobecane (sub-$2000US) and a Merlin (full Record with high zoot wheels ... about $8000US) ... and, the reviewer observed that the Merlin had an intangible quality (as I recall) which probably related to the wheelset & RECORD components (vs. Ultegra 6500). All I know is that it was not a valid comment since the reviewer should have put the Campagnolo wheels (and, requisite drivetrain components) on the Motobecane if he wanted to compare how the two frames-themselves rode. I don't recall the geometry for either frame being spec'd.

    The ONLY reservation I have with the Pinarello Angliru is that you are presumably/theoretically paying a premium for the M.O.ST. bottom bracket shell (which I presume the Angliru has) ... the M.O.ST BB shell is probably "a good thing" but it strikes me as akin to having a frame with a French threaded BB shell -- replacement may become scarce in the future ... so, if you have any inclination that you will still be riding ANY "new" Pinarello frame six years from now, then I would immediately order a M.O.ST-to-BSC adapter ... even if you never use the adapter, you can probably sell it for a premium if/when you part company with the frame (or, not!?!).

    I guess the the bottom line question which you have to answer is "would you buy the bike if it didn't have the Pinarello 'label' on it?"
     
  5. caferacerwanabe

    caferacerwanabe New Member

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    Pinarello's have long been known as 'Chinarello's' as these were one of the 'pro-team' brands to go offshore pretty early in the piece & weren't as up front as Colnago about their origins.

    The problem is not the quality of the build of the Asian bikes its the sales people who gloss over the country of origin while running down the likes of Fuji, Giants , BMC etc.
     
  6. KellyT

    KellyT New Member

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    That's the point that annoys me. I don't really doubt that Taiwanese and possibly Chinese frames are every bit as well made. Possibly better as they are pouring more money and experience into their huge outputs of products.

    But to dress it up and sell it as something it isn't, is really annoying. I woudl be happier to buy a Giant, for what it is. A good honest, solid, well made and well engineeried bike at a good price.
     
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