PING: Dee Randall

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Wayne Boatwright, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Regarding vintage appliances, I once owned an Oster 10-speed blender that I
    purchased in 1966 and I really loved the way it performed. It had a heavy
    chromed steel base and an 800 watt motor. On a lark, in 1975 I bought a Vita-
    Mix and gave away the Oster. I soon discovered that the Vita-Mix sucked like
    a Hoover, so I gave it away and bought another Oster, but the new one had a
    plastic base and only a 450 watt motor. It was "okay" and I've lived with it
    ever since, but always hoped to replace it. I really missed my first one.

    Well, this week I did replace it. To my total amazement I found the original
    model I owned on eBay that was NOS (new old stock) in the original carton
    with accessories and blender book. I put in a last minute bid and won the
    auction for $61.00. It will arrive on Friday and I'm excited. Here's a pix
    of it.

    http://i1.tinypic.com/sgmi68.jpg

    I like this one better than any current models I've looked at in stores, and
    I'm sure it will be the last one I'll ever have to buy.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
    Tags:


  2. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Regarding vintage appliances, I once owned an Oster 10-speed blender that
    > I
    > purchased in 1966 and I really loved the way it performed. It had a heavy
    > chromed steel base and an 800 watt motor. On a lark, in 1975 I bought a
    > Vita-
    > Mix and gave away the Oster. I soon discovered that the Vita-Mix sucked
    > like
    > a Hoover, so I gave it away and bought another Oster, but the new one had
    > a
    > plastic base and only a 450 watt motor. It was "okay" and I've lived with
    > it
    > ever since, but always hoped to replace it. I really missed my first one.
    >
    > Well, this week I did replace it. To my total amazement I found the
    > original
    > model I owned on eBay that was NOS (new old stock) in the original carton
    > with accessories and blender book. I put in a last minute bid and won the
    > auction for $61.00. It will arrive on Friday and I'm excited. Here's a
    > pix
    > of it.


    > http://i1.tinypic.com/sgmi68.jpg
    >
    > I like this one better than any current models I've looked at in stores,
    > and
    > I'm sure it will be the last one I'll ever have to buy.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    > _____________________

    Oh, I love it, Wayne. How lucky did you get! Did talking about your
    vintage appliances here on rfc get your blood going to bidding on this, or
    did you order it before you posted your pictures here.

    We are all so different -- In December this year I gave to the Salvation
    Army an Oster mixer, but I'm sure it was about a 75 model -- but I never
    could get it to do anything. I'm sure the '66 model was more-better. I've
    had my Vitamix for about 10 years or more now. DH likes it more than I do.
    I forget about having it. Leaving appliances out on my counter doesn't give
    me enough incentive to use one. I use all of my appliances often, but so
    irregularly, same as pots and pans and cookbooks.

    I was on ebay again this week, too. I wrote to a woman who was selling a
    'halogen' top. I read that the difference between halogen and the one I
    have - the only difference -- is that there is a red light to show you that
    it is on. I would've bid on it, but I'm still going back and forth in my
    mind about our stove and another $150 would have made me think twice about
    getting rid of my stove because of the extra $275-$300 investment in an old
    stove. Besides DH was not around to bicker with me about it and do the
    bidding. I get nervous if I want something and then someone sends in an
    automatic bid of a dollar over. Is the trick to pick something that no one
    else wants in order to not get nervous? Then, I suppose you would worry
    that you had overbid.

    I know how excited you must be. Oh, I love getting things in the mail.
    Particularly things I've really planned to get and waited to get and they
    are prized little packages in my mind. I love the setting for your Oster --
    I know I've seen your appliance -- I KNOW I've seen the book that goes with
    it. Your osterizer looks new and shiny to me -- just look at that base --
    brand new and sparkley!!! You should've asked the lady for the price of the
    backdrop! Look at that stitching -- months if not years of work.

    Today I was waiting for my package from DHL/Cooking.com I got a Cuisinart
    electric skillet to replace the other one that the legs fell off (this was
    an amazing thing to me -- shock and awe!) The Cuisinart looks so much
    sturdier. And I don't know if you remember so looooong ago I was looking
    for a glass pitcher container that had a top that would not pick up smells
    from the frig. I think it was probably you that gave me the link to the
    Italian one. When I got it today I was even more pleased with the pitcher
    because the top when you twist it is like a little suction vacuum - not like
    the other Italian pitchers made by the same company. I don't know what made
    me take a chance on this one by the same maker, but I did and came up a
    winner on it.
    http://tinyurl.com/mwn43 I've never seen anything like it this top fitting
    in my life -- it's made in Italy, too -- oh, those Italians, I hope they
    never stop making their kitchen products.

    And I got the pie rings for the rolling pin. My next project -- good pie
    crust WITHOUT vegetable shortening, but with lard and/or butter. Do you
    think in pie crust recipes -- there must be trillions of fool-proof ones,
    but I've never found one yet -- that if the instructions seemed like one you
    could work with and that you could substitute lard for the shortening, use
    it; or should one find one specifically written for lard or lard and
    butter. Paula Deen likes to use shortening and butter.

    Again, you're the winner! I can just envision the camera set up for the
    sale of your item. So darned folksy, you just have to buy it because you
    know it's the genuine article.

    Up all night tonight,
    Dee Dee
     
  3. On Tue 28 Mar 2006 11:57:17p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
    Randall?

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Regarding vintage appliances, I once owned an Oster 10-speed blender
    >> that I
    >> purchased in 1966 and I really loved the way it performed. It had a
    >> heavy chromed steel base and an 800 watt motor. On a lark,


    > Oh, I love it, Wayne. How lucky did you get! Did talking about your
    > vintage appliances here on rfc get your blood going to bidding on this,
    > or did you order it before you posted your pictures here.


    Actually, the reverse. I originally went on eBay looking for another
    pitcher for the blender, as it's nice to have more than one at times.
    That's one reason why I was so surprised to find the blender itself.

    > We are all so different -- In December this year I gave to the
    > Salvation Army an Oster mixer, but I'm sure it was about a 75 model --
    > but I never could get it to do anything. I'm sure the '66 model was
    > more-better. I've had my Vitamix for about 10 years or more now. DH
    > likes it more than I do. I forget about having it. Leaving appliances
    > out on my counter doesn't give me enough incentive to use one. I use
    > all of my appliances often, but so irregularly, same as pots and pans
    > and cookbooks.


    It could be that my Vita-Mix was defective. The motor always smelled like
    it was burning when I used it, and it even smoked once. The design of the
    pitcher back then made it impossible to submerse the bottom of it in water,
    not to mention that it could not be put in the dishwasher...a BIG minus in
    my book, as I put everything in the dishwasher.

    > I was on ebay again this week, too. I wrote to a woman who was selling a
    > 'halogen' top. I read that the difference between halogen and the one I
    > have - the only difference -- is that there is a red light to show you
    > that it is on.


    That is not the only difference. Conventional smoothtop elements are
    either a wire-shaped coil or a flat ribbon shape, and both glow red when
    turned on. Every flat top range I've had used one or the other of these,
    but there was also a red light on the top surface to indicate when it was
    on.

    Halogen elements, OTOH, are actually strong halogen lamps underneath the
    glass top. The major feature they offer is virtually an "instant on -
    instant off" response compared to the gradual heating/cooling of the other
    elements.

    I would've bid on it, but I'm still going back and forth
    > in my mind about our stove and another $150 would have made me think
    > twice about getting rid of my stove because of the extra $275-$300
    > investment in an old stove. Besides DH was not around to bicker with me
    > about it and do the bidding. I get nervous if I want something and then
    > someone sends in an automatic bid of a dollar over. Is the trick to pick
    > something that no one else wants in order to not get nervous? Then, I
    > suppose you would worry that you had overbid.


    Well, IMHO, I think you've put enough money into your old stove. At least
    by buying the cartridge you recently got, you have a sense of how a
    smoothtop works, which should help you make a decision on a new stove.

    > I know how excited you must be. Oh, I love getting things in the mail.
    > Particularly things I've really planned to get and waited to get and
    > they are prized little packages in my mind. I love the setting for your
    > Oster -- I know I've seen your appliance -- I KNOW I've seen the book
    > that goes with it. Your osterizer looks new and shiny to me -- just
    > look at that base -- brand new and sparkley!!! You should've asked the
    > lady for the price of the backdrop! Look at that stitching -- months if
    > not years of work.


    Yes, I am excited, and anxious for it to arrive. The seller did set up the
    display nicely. The backdrop is actually a machine-made quilt. When I
    worked as an interior designer back in the late 1960s - early 1970s, I
    would sometimes order custom made quilts when I designed a bedroom. The
    pattern is a variation on what is called "vermicelli" quilting. The
    vermicelli pattern was used plain as in this display, but also used as a
    "filler" pattern on fabrics with extremely large prints. Outline quilting
    was done around the large pattern with the vermicelli filling in the
    background.

    > Today I was waiting for my package from DHL/Cooking.com I got a
    > Cuisinart electric skillet to replace the other one that the legs fell
    > off (this was an amazing thing to me -- shock and awe!) The Cuisinart
    > looks so much sturdier.


    I'm just glad you didn't have an accident with the legs on that frypan.
    They might have come off when it was full of grease! The Cuisinart looks
    beautiful (I looked at the picture you posted in the other thread). Is it
    non-stick? I prefer electric skillets to be non-stick. I once bought a
    Farberware electric skillet that had a stainless steel interior and
    everything stuck to it. :-(

    > And I don't know if you remember so looooong
    > ago I was looking for a glass pitcher container that had a top that
    > would not pick up smells from the frig. I think it was probably you
    > that gave me the link to the Italian one. When I got it today I was
    > even more pleased with the pitcher because the top when you twist it is
    > like a little suction vacuum - not like the other Italian pitchers made
    > by the same company. I don't know what made me take a chance on this one
    > by the same maker, but I did and came up a winner on it.
    > http://tinyurl.com/mwn43 I've never seen anything like it this top
    > fitting in my life -- it's made in Italy, too -- oh, those Italians, I
    > hope they never stop making their kitchen products.


    Yes, I remember your quest for the pitcher. And, yes, I sent you a link,
    but I can't remember if it was for this manufacturer. It does look
    similar, though. I do recall that someone else also sent you a link.

    > And I got the pie rings for the rolling pin. My next project -- good
    > pie crust WITHOUT vegetable shortening, but with lard and/or butter. Do
    > you think in pie crust recipes -- there must be trillions of fool-proof
    > ones, but I've never found one yet -- that if the instructions seemed
    > like one you could work with and that you could substitute lard for the
    > shortening, use it; or should one find one specifically written for
    > lard or lard and butter. Paula Deen likes to use shortening and butter.


    I use exactly the same recipe, regardless of what fat I'm using. When I
    use lard and/or butter, however, I put it in the freezer until quite cold,
    then cut it into 1/2" dice. Using a pastry blender, I cut in half the fat
    until the particles are about the size of chopped nuts. I cut in the
    remainder until the particles are no smaller than a large green pea. I
    find this contributes greatly to the flakiness.

    > Again, you're the winner! I can just envision the camera set up for the
    > sale of your item. So darned folksy, you just have to buy it because
    > you know it's the genuine article.


    This seller goes to a lot of trouble with her setups and they are all
    attractive, but this was the only item I was interested in. I'm sure it
    pays off, because everything looks so attractive.

    I am always intrigued with older items that are listed as NOS (new old
    stock - never used) or MIB (mint in box - mint condition in original
    packaging). Several years ago I was adding to my collection of vacuum pot
    coffee makers. I came across a seller who had bought an old
    hardware/variety store that had been closed for over 30 years, with all the
    original stock inside. I bought two brand new 1940s vintage vacuum pots,
    both of which had all the original parts and packed in the original
    cartons. That was quite a find! One is really beautiful, as the bowls
    have a wide ruby glass pattered band around the middle bordered by thin
    bands of 14k gold.

    > Up all night tonight,


    Poor you! I hate when that happens. :-( I awoke at 2:30am and discovered
    by BG level had dropped to 46, so I ate a bowl of sliced bananas with a bit
    of sugar and some fat-free cream while sitting here at the computer. I am
    going off to bed now, as I have to get up at 5:00am to get ready for work.

    Get some sleep!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
  4. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    I read that the difference between halogen and the one I
    >> have - the only difference -- is that there is a red light to show you
    >> that it is on.


    > > That is not the only difference. Conventional smoothtop elements are

    > either a wire-shaped coil or a flat ribbon shape, and both glow red when
    > turned on. Every flat top range I've had used one or the other of these,
    > but there was also a red light on the top surface to indicate when it was
    > on.


    But not on mine, evidently because it is so old.

    >
    > Halogen elements, OTOH, are actually strong halogen lamps underneath the
    > glass top. The major feature they offer is virtually an "instant on -
    > instant off" response compared to the gradual heating/cooling of the other
    > elements.


    Here is the link to explain what I saw about the differences between halogen
    and
    http://www.appliancefactoryparts.com/applianceshvac/help-center/radiant-halogen.html

    Here it is copied for those who might wish to see without linking up
    The Difference between Radiant and Halogen
    a.. Halogen and radiant elements are basically the same.


    b.. They both use radiant energy to conduct heat to the cookware and food.


    c.. The only difference is that halogen elements also have a halogen bulb
    that circles their radiant element. It will light up instantly to show you
    that the cooktop is turned on.

    ****
    >
    > Yes, I am excited, and anxious for it to arrive. The seller did set up
    > the
    > display nicely. The backdrop is actually a machine-made quilt. When I
    > worked as an interior designer back in the late 1960s - early 1970s, I
    > would sometimes order custom made quilts when I designed a bedroom. The
    > pattern is a variation on what is called "vermicelli" quilting. The
    > vermicelli pattern was used plain as in this display, but also used as a
    > "filler" pattern on fabrics with extremely large prints. Outline quilting
    > was done around the large pattern with the vermicelli filling in the
    > background.


    Your talents are many. I admire these old quilts, too. I've tried my hand
    at quilting, but it's just that -- something I have tried, but it has
    created an appreciation for them. I didn't see that it was machine
    quilted - you've a keen eye. There is a young woman here in Virginia that
    has designed her quilts and machine quilted them. When I asked her how she
    got that beautiful stitch, she said it was with an old Singer. (not the
    pedal type, though -- one of the newer old ones, the ones that people now
    know that 'they ain't what they used to be.')


    The Cuisinart
    >> looks so much sturdier.


    Yes, it is non-stick, but looks like it might be a thicker or harder surface
    than the last one I had.
    Even though I use proper tools, DH can ding the surface (even though he's
    careful) . I do prefer stainless steel for high heat now, but if the
    electrical goes hay-wire, it could easily be a worse situation than if it
    were non-stick.


    >> I've never seen anything like it this top
    >> fitting in my life -- it's made in Italy, too -- oh, those Italians, I
    >> hope they never stop making their kitchen products.

    >
    > Yes, I remember your quest for the pitcher. Here's the link that says

    http://tinyurl.com/mwn43
    Material : Glass body and plastic lid ( tight fitting, but not
    completely airtight)


    Note that it says "not completely airtight." I'm glad I took a chance on
    it. Because here it is "hermetically sealed."
    http://i2.tinypic.com/sl5jzm.jpg
    You would think they would've described it better.

    ***

    >
    > I am always intrigued with older items that are listed as NOS (new old
    > stock - never used) or MIB (mint in box - mint condition in original
    > packaging). Several years ago I was adding to my collection of vacuum pot
    > coffee makers. I came across a seller who had bought an old
    > hardware/variety store that had been closed for over 30 years, with all
    > the
    > original stock inside. I bought two brand new 1940s vintage vacuum pots,
    > both of which had all the original parts and packed in the original
    > cartons. That was quite a find! One is really beautiful, as the bowls
    > have a wide ruby glass pattered band around the middle bordered by thin
    > bands of 14k gold.


    Wayne, are you going to have room for your treasurers, or are you going to
    have to buy a Costco shed? DH looks longingly at those sheds .... One shed
    is enough.

    ***
    I awoke at 2:30am and discovered
    > by BG level had dropped to 46, so I ate a bowl of sliced bananas with a
    > bit
    > of sugar and some fat-free cream while sitting here at the computer.


    Wayne, did I relate this? A fellow at fil's apartments came to dinner one
    morning and sat beside me, didn't acknowledge me (he knows me well and is a
    southern gentleman from Alabama or Mississippi) and was looking quite
    disconcerted. I asked him if there was anything he needed, if I could help
    him, and he was so thankful I asked. His reading was so low and he wanted
    me to find him some jelly. The asst. manager was standing behind me at the
    adjoining table pouring coffee when I stood up and asked him for some jelly.
    He shouted "YELLY" "What's Yelly, I've never heard of it." All the people
    were staring at us, I think waiting for a confrontation. Finally I said
    JAM, JAM. He said, "Well, why didn't you say jam." Stunned over someone
    not knowing what Jelly is, (even though he's Indian) I hastily explained
    that Virgil had low blood sugar and he needed it fast. I wonder what
    would've happened if I'd asked for YAM, YAM. I'm still laughing over this
    episode, but of course, it was very frightening to me when it happened.

    An aside: at the table at f-i-l's I think they like play "can you top this"
    a little. They have little arguments over little things. DH was at
    breakfast in CT this morning and he called me to ask me the name of a
    Charles Aznavour (sp?) song, if it was really by him; obviously it was
    another one of their important arguments. Virgil, the southern gentlemen,
    is the only one that stays out of these arguments. Smart guy!

    I don't know why I have so much trouble remembering Alabama from
    Mississippi. I know you are from one or the other. Let me guess.
    Mississippi?
    Dee Dee
     
  5. On Wed 29 Mar 2006 02:32:23p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
    Randall?

    > I read that the difference between halogen and the one I
    >>> have - the only difference -- is that there is a red light to show you
    >>> that it is on.

    >
    >> > That is not the only difference. Conventional smoothtop elements are

    >> either a wire-shaped coil or a flat ribbon shape, and both glow red
    >> when turned on. Every flat top range I've had used one or the other of
    >> these, but there was also a red light on the top surface to indicate
    >> when it was on.

    >
    > But not on mine, evidently because it is so old.


    Yes, that's certainly possible that yours does not have an indicator light.

    >> Halogen elements, OTOH, are actually strong halogen lamps underneath
    >> the glass top. The major feature they offer is virtually an "instant
    >> on - instant off" response compared to the gradual heating/cooling of
    >> the other elements.

    >
    > Here is the link to explain what I saw about the differences between
    > halogen and
    > http://www.appliancefactoryparts.com/applianceshvac/help-center/radiant-h
    > alogen.html
    >
    > Here it is copied for those who might wish to see without linking up
    > The Difference between Radiant and Halogen
    > a.. Halogen and radiant elements are basically the same.
    >
    >
    > b.. They both use radiant energy to conduct heat to the cookware and
    > food.
    >
    >
    > c.. The only difference is that halogen elements also have a halogen
    > bulb
    > that circles their radiant element. It will light up instantly to show
    > you that the cooktop is turned on.


    I have to take strong exception to that. What they are describing is the use
    of a halogen light to merely indicate whether or not a conventional element
    is turned on. This is NOT a true halogen cooktop.

    A true halogen cooktop uses ONLY a halogen bulb to produce the heat itself.
    It also produces light which indicates whether or not the unit is on. There
    is no other heating element involved.

    It's no wonder people get confused!

    >> Yes, I am excited, and anxious for it to arrive. The seller did set up
    >> the display nicely. The backdrop is actually a machine-made quilt.
    >> When I worked as an interior designer back in the late 1960s - early
    >> 1970s, I would sometimes order custom made quilts when I designed a
    >> bedroom. The pattern is a variation on what is called "vermicelli"
    >> quilting. The vermicelli pattern was used plain as in this display,
    >> but also used as a "filler" pattern on fabrics with extremely large
    >> prints. Outline quilting was done around the large pattern with the
    >> vermicelli filling in the background.

    >
    > Your talents are many. I admire these old quilts, too. I've tried my
    > hand at quilting, but it's just that -- something I have tried, but it
    > has created an appreciation for them. I didn't see that it was
    > machine quilted - you've a keen eye. There is a young woman here in
    > Virginia that has designed her quilts and machine quilted them. When I
    > asked her how she got that beautiful stitch, she said it was with an old
    > Singer. (not the pedal type, though -- one of the newer old ones, the
    > ones that people now know that 'they ain't what they used to be.')


    My maternal great-grandmother and both my grandmothers were prolific and
    expert quilters. I learned to appreciate such quilts from early childhood.
    When we lived in Ohio I once entered two of my maternal grandmother's quilts
    in the Ohio State Fair, and both won blue ribbons in different quilt
    categories. I'm lucky to have 6 or 7 of their heirloom quilts that date from
    the 1930s and before. I also have newer ones that they made in the 1950s and
    1960s. None of my stupid cousins ever wanted any, so I would up with most of
    them. :)

    >
    > The Cuisinart
    >>> looks so much sturdier.

    >
    > Yes, it is non-stick, but looks like it might be a thicker or harder
    > surface than the last one I had.
    > Even though I use proper tools, DH can ding the surface (even though
    > he's careful) . I do prefer stainless steel for high heat now, but if
    > the electrical goes hay-wire, it could easily be a worse situation than
    > if it were non-stick.


    The only two non-stick pans in my kitchen are my electric frypan and my
    omelette pan. For me that's a must, otherwise all my other pans are either
    stainless steel, enameled cast iron, or plain cast iron. I've had exceptonal
    luck with my omelette pan which has a Silverstone coating over cast aluminum.
    I bought in the mid-1970s and it still looks and performs like new. Electric
    skillets, OTOH, I have had to replace numerous times. Perhaps the next time
    I'll try the Cuisinart like you bought.

    >>> I've never seen anything like it this top
    >>> fitting in my life -- it's made in Italy, too -- oh, those Italians, I
    >>> hope they never stop making their kitchen products.

    >>
    >> Yes, I remember your quest for the pitcher. Here's the link that says
    >> http://tinyurl.com/mwn43

    > Material : Glass body and plastic lid ( tight fitting, but not
    > completely airtight)
    >
    > Note that it says "not completely airtight." I'm glad I took a chance
    > on it. Because here it is "hermetically sealed."
    > http://i2.tinypic.com/sl5jzm.jpg
    > You would think they would've described it better.


    I don't use pitchers much, or I would be very tempted to order some of these.
    When I do use a pitcher it doesn't require a top, since I don't store
    anything in them. I have an assortment of very old pottery and stoneware
    pitchers that came from my family and I use those.

    >>
    >> I am always intrigued with older items that are listed as NOS (new old
    >> stock - never used) or MIB (mint in box - mint condition in original
    >> packaging). Several years ago I was adding to my collection of vacuum
    >> pot coffee makers. I came across a seller who had bought an old
    >> hardware/variety store that had been closed for over 30 years, with all
    >> the original stock inside. I bought two brand new 1940s vintage vacuum
    >> pots, both of which had all the original parts and packed in the
    >> original cartons. That was quite a find! One is really beautiful, as
    >> the bowls have a wide ruby glass pattered band around the middle
    >> bordered by thin bands of 14k gold.

    >
    > Wayne, are you going to have room for your treasurers, or are you going
    > to have to buy a Costco shed? DH looks longingly at those sheds ....
    > One shed is enough.


    I hope I'm right, but I think we have exceptional display and storage areas
    in the new house. I've managed to have this in most houses I've owned, but
    not in this present rental. It's horrible! We will have a shed, I think 12
    x 15 feet, but that will be for mostly outdoor items.

    > I awoke at 2:30am and discovered
    >> by BG level had dropped to 46, so I ate a bowl of sliced bananas with a
    >> bit of sugar and some fat-free cream while sitting here at the
    >> computer.

    >
    > Wayne, did I relate this? A fellow at fil's apartments came to dinner
    > one morning and sat beside me, didn't acknowledge me (he knows me well
    > and is a southern gentleman from Alabama or Mississippi) and was
    > looking quite disconcerted. I asked him if there was anything he
    > needed, if I could help him, and he was so thankful I asked. His
    > reading was so low and he wanted me to find him some jelly. The asst.
    > manager was standing behind me at the adjoining table pouring coffee
    > when I stood up and asked him for some jelly. He shouted "YELLY" "What's
    > Yelly, I've never heard of it." All the people were staring at us, I
    > think waiting for a confrontation. Finally I said JAM, JAM. He said,
    > "Well, why didn't you say jam." Stunned over someone not knowing what
    > Jelly is, (even though he's Indian) I hastily explained that Virgil had
    > low blood sugar and he needed it fast. I wonder what would've happened
    > if I'd asked for YAM, YAM. I'm still laughing over this episode, but of
    > course, it was very frightening to me when it happened.


    Poor Virgil! One thing I fear about getting very old is being at the mercy
    of people who either don't understand or care. It's a very unpleasant
    prospect. He was very lucky you were there.

    > An aside: at the table at f-i-l's I think they like play "can you top
    > this" a little. They have little arguments over little things. DH was
    > at breakfast in CT this morning and he called me to ask me the name of a
    > Charles Aznavour (sp?) song, if it was really by him; obviously it was
    > another one of their important arguments. Virgil, the southern
    > gentlemen, is the only one that stays out of these arguments. Smart guy!


    LOL! Yes, smart guy, that Virgil!

    >
    > I don't know why I have so much trouble remembering Alabama from
    > Mississippi. I know you are from one or the other. Let me guess.
    > Mississippi?


    Yes, you remember Mississippi correctly, as that's what I've written before.
    Actually, both my parents' families knew each other from the time they both
    arrived in the US from England in the mid 1700s. I have letters written
    between the families dating back as early as the 1770s. They both originally
    settled in North Carolina, then over the years migrated to Alabama, and
    finally to Mississippi at the end of the Civil War. In the case of my
    grandparents' generation, 3 brothers from my dad's side of the family married
    3 sisters from my mother's side of the family. That was the first time there
    had been a marriage between the two families. Somewhere in there that leaves
    me with an assortment of double-cousins. Much earlier, around 1795, one my
    ancestors was married to a sister of Rachel Jackson, Andrew Jackson's wife
    who died before he was inaugurated.

    So much for history! :)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
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