Ping: Pandora - or anyone else - Chestnut Honey

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dee Randall, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    From Italy
    http://www.cybercucina.com/ccdocs/products/RC911.html?source=gaws&ccq=AdGroupHoneyChestnut

    From Sicily
    http://www.siciliaemporium.it/produ...id=86&osCsid=0bdfe1ccff77308a7275267e28c206f4
    The oak chestnut honey is slightly bitter and it has brown color. Its
    peculiarity is does not crystallize during the winter. It is very rich of
    minerals salt, very good for the people that pratice sport. It is used to
    honey, with seasoned cheese or spicy cheese.

    Pandora, have you tasted both kinds?
    If you have, is the chestnut honey from Italy also "slightly bitter and
    brown"?

    Thanks so much,
    Dee Dee
     
    Tags:


  2. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > From Italy
    > http://www.cybercucina.com/ccdocs/products/RC911.html?source=gaws&ccq=AdGroupHoneyChestnut
    >
    > From Sicily
    > http://www.siciliaemporium.it/produ...id=86&osCsid=0bdfe1ccff77308a7275267e28c206f4
    > The oak chestnut honey is slightly bitter and it has brown color. Its
    > peculiarity is does not crystallize during the winter. It is very rich of
    > minerals salt, very good for the people that pratice sport. It is used to
    > honey, with seasoned cheese or spicy cheese.
    >
    > Pandora, have you tasted both kinds?
    > If you have, is the chestnut honey from Italy also "slightly bitter and
    > brown"?


    Yes. We often use chestnut honey in Piedmont. Because in Piedmont use to eat
    the very matured cheese (such as "Toma stagionata") with a little honey on
    it. In the most elegance restaurants they use to serve several quality fo
    cheese togheter with 3-4 quality of honey and italian fruit "Mostarda".
    BTW chestnut honey is *less* sweet then the others and yes, it is brown.
    I think, looking at your links, that first honey is very expensive (18 $)
    and the second is at good price 3.50 $
    Look at this (terra in cielo is a good brand) ; they sell products made in
    monastery.
    The capacity of the pot is 1 kilo and they sell it at about 7,50 ?. They say
    it is good for blood circulation and to cure weariness.
    http://www.terraincielo.it/negozio/

    Cheers
    Pandora
     
  3. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > news:[email protected]
    >> From Italy
    >> http://www.cybercucina.com/ccdocs/products/RC911.html?source=gaws&ccq=AdGroupHoneyChestnut
    >>
    >> From Sicily
    >> http://www.siciliaemporium.it/produ...id=86&osCsid=0bdfe1ccff77308a7275267e28c206f4
    >> The oak chestnut honey is slightly bitter and it has brown color. Its
    >> peculiarity is does not crystallize during the winter. It is very rich of
    >> minerals salt, very good for the people that pratice sport. It is used to
    >> honey, with seasoned cheese or spicy cheese.
    >>
    >> Pandora, have you tasted both kinds?
    >> If you have, is the chestnut honey from Italy also "slightly bitter and
    >> brown"?

    >
    > Yes. We often use chestnut honey in Piedmont. Because in Piedmont use to
    > eat the very matured cheese (such as "Toma stagionata") with a little
    > honey on it. In the most elegance restaurants they use to serve several
    > quality fo cheese togheter with 3-4 quality of honey and italian fruit
    > "Mostarda".
    > BTW chestnut honey is *less* sweet then the others and yes, it is brown.
    > I think, looking at your links, that first honey is very expensive (18 $)
    > and the second is at good price 3.50 $
    > Look at this (terra in cielo is a good brand) ; they sell products made in
    > monastery.
    > The capacity of the pot is 1 kilo and they sell it at about 7,50 ?. They
    > say it is good for blood circulation and to cure weariness.
    > http://www.terraincielo.it/negozio/
    >
    > Cheers
    > Pandora

    Yhanks, Pandora. I use Italian honey EVERY day. My next order will be some
    chestnut honey. Thanks for all your tips.
    De Dee
     
  4. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> From Italy
    >>> http://www.cybercucina.com/ccdocs/products/RC911.html?source=gaws&ccq=AdGroupHoneyChestnut
    >>>
    >>> From Sicily
    >>> http://www.siciliaemporium.it/produ...id=86&osCsid=0bdfe1ccff77308a7275267e28c206f4
    >>> The oak chestnut honey is slightly bitter and it has brown color. Its
    >>> peculiarity is does not crystallize during the winter. It is very rich
    >>> of minerals salt, very good for the people that pratice sport. It is
    >>> used to honey, with seasoned cheese or spicy cheese.
    >>>
    >>> Pandora, have you tasted both kinds?
    >>> If you have, is the chestnut honey from Italy also "slightly bitter and
    >>> brown"?

    >>
    >> Yes. We often use chestnut honey in Piedmont. Because in Piedmont use to
    >> eat the very matured cheese (such as "Toma stagionata") with a little
    >> honey on it. In the most elegance restaurants they use to serve several
    >> quality fo cheese togheter with 3-4 quality of honey and italian fruit
    >> "Mostarda".
    >> BTW chestnut honey is *less* sweet then the others and yes, it is brown.
    >> I think, looking at your links, that first honey is very expensive (18 $)
    >> and the second is at good price 3.50 $
    >> Look at this (terra in cielo is a good brand) ; they sell products made
    >> in monastery.
    >> The capacity of the pot is 1 kilo and they sell it at about 7,50 ?. They
    >> say it is good for blood circulation and to cure weariness.
    >> http://www.terraincielo.it/negozio/
    >>
    >> Cheers
    >> Pandora

    > Yhanks, Pandora. I use Italian honey EVERY day. My next order will be
    > some chestnut honey. Thanks for all your tips.
    > De Dee


    You are welcome?
    Haven't you got chestnut honey in USA?
    Pandora
    >
    >
     
  5. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest


    >> Yhanks, Pandora. I use Italian honey EVERY day. My next order will be
    >> some chestnut honey. Thanks for all your tips.
    >> De Dee

    >
    > You are welcome?
    > Haven't you got chestnut honey in USA?
    > Pandora
    >>
    >>

    >


    Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    trees.
    "This tree, once the dominant species over much of our Eastern forests, was
    brought down by a disease."
    http://www.munic.state.ct.us/BURLINGTON/chestnuttree.htm
    For decades plant pathologists and breeders tried to create a
    blight-resistant tree by crossing our own species with the resistant Chinese
    tree, but always with unsatisfactory results. Now, advances in our
    understanding of genetics have shown us where those early researchers went
    wrong. More importantly, we now know what path we must take to successfully
    breed an American chestnut with resistance to this deadly invader. We now
    know we can have this precious tree back. (American Chestnut Foundation.)"

    Correct me if I'm wrong about bees making honey from the flowers of this
    grand old tree.
    Dee Dee
     
  6. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    > trees.


    Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    chestnut tree?

    nancy
     
  7. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Pandora wrote:
    > "Dee Randall" writes:
    > >
    > > My next order will be some chestnut honey.

    >
    > Haven't you got chestnut honey in USA?


    Of course, the USA has plenty... and you 'talians have
    none compares with this: http://tinyurl.com/bmabh
     
  8. cathyxyz

    cathyxyz Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Pandora wrote:
    > > "Dee Randall" writes:
    > > >
    > > > My next order will be some chestnut honey.

    > >
    > > Haven't you got chestnut honey in USA?

    >
    > Of course, the USA has plenty... and you 'talians have


    Ok, we now know your version of "chestnuts" ;) thanks for sharing.

    Cheers
    Cathy(xyz)
     
  9. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >>> Yhanks, Pandora. I use Italian honey EVERY day. My next order will be
    >>> some chestnut honey. Thanks for all your tips.
    >>> De Dee

    >>
    >> You are welcome?
    >> Haven't you got chestnut honey in USA?
    >> Pandora
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    > Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    > trees.
    > "This tree, once the dominant species over much of our Eastern forests,
    > was brought down by a disease."
    > http://www.munic.state.ct.us/BURLINGTON/chestnuttree.htm
    > For decades plant pathologists and breeders tried to create a
    > blight-resistant tree by crossing our own species with the resistant
    > Chinese tree, but always with unsatisfactory results. Now, advances in our
    > understanding of genetics have shown us where those early researchers went
    > wrong. More importantly, we now know what path we must take to
    > successfully breed an American chestnut with resistance to this deadly
    > invader. We now know we can have this precious tree back. (American
    > Chestnut Foundation.)"


    Oh! I didn't know all that!!! I 'm so sorry! Do they know the name of the
    fungus?

    >
    > Correct me if I'm wrong about bees making honey from the flowers of this
    > grand old tree.


    Yes! They make honey from flowers :)
    Cheers and thank you for the very interesting link
    Pandora
    > Dee Dee
    >
    >
    >
     
  10. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >> trees.

    >
    > Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    > chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    > common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    > chestnut tree?
    >
    > nancy


    Ohhhh! Now we will have a battle of opinions :)))
    Pandora
     
  11. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio


    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>> Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >>> trees.

    >>
    >> Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    >> chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    >> common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    >> chestnut tree?


    > Ohhhh! Now we will have a battle of opinions :)))


    No opinions, we do have chestnut orchards here, anyone can
    google. And chestnut honey.

    nancy
     
  12. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > > Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    > > trees.

    >
    > Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    > chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    > common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    > chestnut tree?


    It's the American Chestnut tree that's affected by disease... there are
    still plenty of chestnut trees that grow very well in the US. The
    Chinese Chestnut is a wonderful tree with excellent eating nuts. The
    Horse Chestnut also grows very well in the US, its nuts are not
    considered edible by humans but are consumed by wildlife, I'm sure its
    flowers are visited by bees.

    http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?id=105

    http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?id=160

    And of course the US has an abundance of chesty honeys. ;)

    Sheldon
     
  13. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >> trees.

    >
    > Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    > chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    > common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    > chestnut tree?
    >
    > nancy

    Yes, the American Chestnut Tree.
    Dee Dee
     
  14. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote


    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>> Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >>> trees.

    >>
    >> Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    >> chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    >> common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    >> chestnut tree?


    > Yes, the American Chestnut Tree.


    Well ... we still have chestnuts. Are those chestnut trees in Italy
    American Chestnut Trees?

    nancy (confused)
     
  15. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >> trees.

    >
    > Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    > chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    > common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    > chestnut tree?
    >
    > nancy
    >


    http://www.acf.org/Chestnut_history.htm
    Then the chestnut blight struck:
    First discovered in 1904 in New York City, the blight - an Asian fungus to
    which our native chestnuts had very little resistance - spread quickly. In
    its wake it left only dead and dying stems. By 1950, except for the shrubby
    root sprouts the species continually produces (and which also quickly become
    infected), the keystone species on some nine million acres of eastern
    forests had disappeared.
     
  16. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> > Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >> > trees.

    >>
    >> Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    >> chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    >> common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    >> chestnut tree?

    >
    > It's the American Chestnut tree that's affected by disease... there are
    > still plenty of chestnut trees that grow very well in the US.


    Of course, as you say ... I have chestnuts from an american
    orchard as we speak (they are dried), in my freezer. I'm quite
    fond of chestnuts.

    > The
    > Chinese Chestnut is a wonderful tree with excellent eating nuts. The
    > Horse Chestnut also grows very well in the US, its nuts are not
    > considered edible by humans but are consumed by wildlife, I'm sure its
    > flowers are visited by bees.
    >
    > http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?id=105
    >
    > http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?id=160
    >
    > And of course the US has an abundance of chesty honeys. ;)


    Heh.

    nancy
     
  17. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    >
    >>> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>>> Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >>>> trees.
    >>>
    >>> Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    >>> chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    >>> common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    >>> chestnut tree?

    >
    >> Ohhhh! Now we will have a battle of opinions :)))

    >
    > No opinions, we do have chestnut orchards here, anyone can
    > google. And chestnut honey.
    >
    > nancy
    >


    Oh! I think Dee would be very interested to hear this :)
    Of which country are you talking about?
    Pandora
     
  18. Pandora

    Pandora Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>> Pandora, I assume we have no chestnut honey because we have no chestnut
    >>> trees.

    >>
    >> Why do you say that? Just curious, because we do have
    >> chestnut trees. And chestnut honey, although it's not all that
    >> common. Are you talking about some specific kind of
    >> chestnut tree?
    >>
    >> nancy

    > Yes, the American Chestnut Tree.
    > Dee Dee


    Explain to me, please. Because I begin to understand nothing.
    Cheers
    Pandora
     
  19. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Pandora" <[email protected]> wrote

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio


    >> No opinions, we do have chestnut orchards here, anyone can
    >> google. And chestnut honey.


    > Oh! I think Dee would be very interested to hear this :)
    > Of which country are you talking about?


    United States of America, where Dee also lives.

    nancy
     
  20. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

Loading...