Pizza stones? Tips please

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Hi,

    I have today cooked myself my first homemade pizza and apart from the
    fact i used wholemeal flour (which turned out quite nice) and it was
    baked on a rectangular baking tray i have to say they turned out very
    nice.

    Anyway, I would like to invest in a pizza stone so first of all what is
    the best type - marbel or granite (dont know if granite is the most
    common but it we have many qranite quarries here in Scotland)?

    Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?

    Cheers
     
    Tags:


  2. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have today cooked myself my first homemade pizza and apart from the
    > fact i used wholemeal flour (which turned out quite nice) and it was
    > baked on a rectangular baking tray i have to say they turned out very
    > nice.
    >
    > Anyway, I would like to invest in a pizza stone so first of all what is
    > the best type - marbel or granite (dont know if granite is the most
    > common but it we have many qranite quarries here in Scotland)?
    >
    > Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    > and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?
    >
    > Cheers
    >


    Treat it like cast iron. Rinse it, don't wash it with soap. The dirtier it
    gets, the better it works!

    (Sheldon, leave that one alone!)

    kili
     
  3. On Wed 28 Dec 2005 02:46:58p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it ?

    > Hi,
    >
    > I have today cooked myself my first homemade pizza and apart from the
    > fact i used wholemeal flour (which turned out quite nice) and it was
    > baked on a rectangular baking tray i have to say they turned out very
    > nice.
    >
    > Anyway, I would like to invest in a pizza stone so first of all what is
    > the best type - marbel or granite (dont know if granite is the most
    > common but it we have many qranite quarries here in Scotland)?
    >
    > Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    > and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?


    Most baking stones are not marble or granite, but made of a ceramic
    material. Some people actually use quarry tiles (meant for flooring).

    Unless you get a severely burnt on stain or a gooey spill, the best way to
    clean a baking stone is to simple scrape any residue off. If you have a
    self-cleaning oven, it can be successfully cleaned by putting through a
    cleaning cycle.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    __________________________________________________________________
    And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
     
  4. Jimbo

    Jimbo Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have today cooked myself my first homemade pizza and apart from the
    > fact i used wholemeal flour (which turned out quite nice) and it was
    > baked on a rectangular baking tray i have to say they turned out very
    > nice.
    >
    > Anyway, I would like to invest in a pizza stone so first of all what is
    > the best type - marbel or granite (dont know if granite is the most
    > common but it we have many qranite quarries here in Scotland)?
    >
    > Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    > and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?
    >
    > Cheers
    >

    Tried many over the years and the best has been a pizza stone from
    Walmart, less than $10. Plenty big, cheap and easy to replace if it
    breaks. Rarely do I clean it and if I do I just wipe it down or scrape
    with a spatula. As far as baking pizza I almost always use parchment
    pater, easy and cheap and works great.
     
  5. [email protected] wrote in news:1135806418.906095.216290
    @f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I have today cooked myself my first homemade pizza and apart from the
    > fact i used wholemeal flour (which turned out quite nice) and it was
    > baked on a rectangular baking tray i have to say they turned out very
    > nice.
    >
    > Anyway, I would like to invest in a pizza stone so first of all what is
    > the best type - marbel or granite (dont know if granite is the most
    > common but it we have many qranite quarries here in Scotland)?
    >
    > Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    > and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?
    >
    > Cheers
    >


    Measure your oven, goto a home center, buy an unglazed floor tile large
    enough to fit in your oven. This will be much cheaper than those things
    labelled as a pizza stone and will work the same. If your oven has a hard
    time cooking things evenly, leave it in full time. My oven was horrible,
    now it is a dream with a $5 floor tile. Cleaning, never had to clean
    mine.

    Another tip for making a good pizza is to set your oven to its highest
    setting usually 500 and leave it there for an 1/2 to 1 hour to fully
    preheat the oven, then bake the pizza. This allows the heat to fully soak
    into the oven and when you place a cold pizza in the oven it will recover
    quicker. Shoving it in after the light goes out indicating it has reached
    temperature is not the way to preheat an oven for pizza.


    This site says 1 hr which is what I do.

    http://www.pizzatherapy.com/tipsand.htm

    Naysayers may disagree with the amount of preheat time. Try it for
    yourself and report on your results.

    --
    ---
    Charles Quinn

    "Choosing the lesser of two evils, is still choosing evil" - Jerry Garcia
     
  6. Pete C.

    Pete C. Guest

    Charles Quinn wrote:
    >
    > [email protected] wrote in news:1135806418.906095.216290
    > @f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:
    >
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I have today cooked myself my first homemade pizza and apart from the
    > > fact i used wholemeal flour (which turned out quite nice) and it was
    > > baked on a rectangular baking tray i have to say they turned out very
    > > nice.
    > >
    > > Anyway, I would like to invest in a pizza stone so first of all what is
    > > the best type - marbel or granite (dont know if granite is the most
    > > common but it we have many qranite quarries here in Scotland)?
    > >
    > > Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    > > and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?
    > >
    > > Cheers
    > >

    >
    > Measure your oven, goto a home center, buy an unglazed floor tile large
    > enough to fit in your oven. This will be much cheaper than those things
    > labelled as a pizza stone and will work the same. If your oven has a hard
    > time cooking things evenly, leave it in full time. My oven was horrible,
    > now it is a dream with a $5 floor tile. Cleaning, never had to clean
    > mine.
    >
    > Another tip for making a good pizza is to set your oven to its highest
    > setting usually 500 and leave it there for an 1/2 to 1 hour to fully
    > preheat the oven, then bake the pizza. This allows the heat to fully soak
    > into the oven and when you place a cold pizza in the oven it will recover
    > quicker. Shoving it in after the light goes out indicating it has reached
    > temperature is not the way to preheat an oven for pizza.
    >
    > This site says 1 hr which is what I do.
    >
    > http://www.pizzatherapy.com/tipsand.htm
    >
    > Naysayers may disagree with the amount of preheat time. Try it for
    > yourself and report on your results.
    >
    > --
    > ---
    > Charles Quinn
    >
    > "Choosing the lesser of two evils, is still choosing evil" - Jerry Garcia


    Absolutely positively the most important element to successful use of a
    pizza stone is to run the oven as hot as it will go, 500 degrees or 550
    degrees is even better. It's still not as hot as a "real" pizza oven,
    but it's hot enough for the stone to work properly.

    I think a great many people buy a pizza stone and then are afraid to run
    the oven hot enough. Running the oven at 350 will give you a truly
    pathetic result and probably also cause the pizza to stick. At 500
    degrees + the pizza will never stick since it's crusted the instant it
    touches the stone. You get a wonderfully crisp properly cooked crust.

    I personally use a "multi-bake" technique where I brush the crust with
    olive oil and put it in the oven for a few minutes to pre-bake, then
    pull it out, sauce and top it and then back in the oven a few more
    minutes to melt the cheese. The olive oil pre-bake crisps and seals the
    crust so it doesn't absorb the sauce and get soggy.

    Pete C.
     
  7. "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Absolutely positively the most important element to successful use of a
    > pizza stone is to run the oven as hot as it will go, 500 degrees or 550
    > degrees is even better. It's still not as hot as a "real" pizza oven,
    > but it's hot enough for the stone to work properly.


    And let the stone heat for a good amount of time too. The thicker the
    stone, the more mass to heat so wait al east 15 to 20 minutes.
     
  8. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest


    > I personally use a "multi-bake" technique where I brush the crust with
    > olive oil and put it in the oven for a few minutes to pre-bake, then
    > pull it out, sauce and top it and then back in the oven a few more
    > minutes to melt the cheese. The olive oil pre-bake crisps and seals the
    > crust so it doesn't absorb the sauce and get soggy.
    >
    > Pete C.


    I do a 'multi-bake' this way. I put all all toppings on the pizza except
    cheese. I bake it for a few minutes, pull it out and put the cheese on, then
    bake some more.
    Dee Dee
     
  9. On Wed 28 Dec 2005 09:36:22p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Edwin
    Pawlowski?

    >
    > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Absolutely positively the most important element to successful use of a
    >> pizza stone is to run the oven as hot as it will go, 500 degrees or 550
    >> degrees is even better. It's still not as hot as a "real" pizza oven,
    >> but it's hot enough for the stone to work properly.

    >
    > And let the stone heat for a good amount of time too. The thicker the
    > stone, the more mass to heat so wait al east 15 to 20 minutes.


    You can force the temperature higher in some ovens by using the broiler
    setting after initially preheating the oven, since some ovens have a higher
    cut-off temperature for broiling. It's rarely documented in the manual.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    __________________________________________________________________
    And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
     
  10. Kent

    Kent Guest

    Your pizza stone should be HEFTY and HEAVY. You heat it up for one hour at
    550F before your pizza goes on it.
    You NEVER take it out of the oven and wash it. In fact, water never touches
    it. Scrape it off when it needs scraping, and that's it.
    I have had my late brother's pizza stone on the lower oven rack for 25 years
    and everything is fine, particularly the pizza.
    Before plunging away at a gourmet store for yuppies, you might check a local
    restaurant supply house. That where we always buy our pizza paddles, the
    same ones that pizza houses buy.
    Kent
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have today cooked myself my first homemade pizza and apart from the
    > fact i used wholemeal flour (which turned out quite nice) and it was
    > baked on a rectangular baking tray i have to say they turned out very
    > nice.
    >
    > Anyway, I would like to invest in a pizza stone so first of all what is
    > the best type - marbel or granite (dont know if granite is the most
    > common but it we have many qranite quarries here in Scotland)?
    >
    > Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    > and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
     
  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Kent wrote:
    > Your pizza stone should be HEFTY and HEAVY. You heat it up for one hour at
    > 550F before your pizza goes on it.
    > You NEVER take it out of the oven and wash it. In fact, water never touches
    > it. Scrape it off when it needs scraping, and that's it.
    > I have had my late brother's pizza stone on the lower oven rack for 25 years
    > and everything is fine, particularly the pizza.
    > Before plunging away at a gourmet store for yuppies, you might check a local
    > restaurant supply house. That where we always buy our pizza paddles, the
    > same ones that pizza houses buy.


    Twenty five years and you still refer to a peel as a paddle... and you
    have the audacity to be giving baking advice and poke fun at others who
    likely know far more than you?
     
  12. Jimbo

    Jimbo Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Kent wrote:
    >
    >>Your pizza stone should be HEFTY and HEAVY. You heat it up for one hour at
    >>550F before your pizza goes on it.
    >>You NEVER take it out of the oven and wash it. In fact, water never touches
    >>it. Scrape it off when it needs scraping, and that's it.
    >>I have had my late brother's pizza stone on the lower oven rack for 25 years
    >>and everything is fine, particularly the pizza.
    >>Before plunging away at a gourmet store for yuppies, you might check a local
    >>restaurant supply house. That where we always buy our pizza paddles, the
    >>same ones that pizza houses buy.

    >
    >
    > Twenty five years and you still refer to a peel as a paddle... and you
    > have the audacity to be giving baking advice and poke fun at others who
    > likely know far more than you?
    >

    Well 'PADDLE' you both for picking the nits!!
     
  13. sf

    sf Guest

    On 29 Dec 2005 05:51:21 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > On Wed 28 Dec 2005 09:36:22p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Edwin
    > Pawlowski?
    >
    > >
    > > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >> Absolutely positively the most important element to successful use of a
    > >> pizza stone is to run the oven as hot as it will go, 500 degrees or 550
    > >> degrees is even better. It's still not as hot as a "real" pizza oven,
    > >> but it's hot enough for the stone to work properly.

    > >
    > > And let the stone heat for a good amount of time too. The thicker the
    > > stone, the more mass to heat so wait al east 15 to 20 minutes.

    >
    > You can force the temperature higher in some ovens by using the broiler
    > setting after initially preheating the oven, since some ovens have a higher
    > cut-off temperature for broiling. It's rarely documented in the manual.


    Honest. A good home made pizza doesn't need a blast furnace -
    probably because the door doesn't open as many times as a commercial
    oven does. I can do mine (size equivalent of an extra large) in about
    8 minutes at 475°.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  14. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Absolutely positively the most important element to successful use of a
    >> pizza stone is to run the oven as hot as it will go, 500 degrees or 550
    >> degrees is even better. It's still not as hot as a "real" pizza oven,
    >> but it's hot enough for the stone to work properly.

    >
    > And let the stone heat for a good amount of time too. The thicker the
    > stone, the more mass to heat so wait al east 15 to 20 minutes.

    We made pizza tonight. I let my stone heat 1 hour at 550. Each time the
    element comes on, it bakes the stone even hotter, eventually getting the
    stone as hot and hotter than the inside of oven temperature. Don't take my
    word for it, check the bread groups and google. I got this information from
    the scientific breadmaker experts.

    I have two stones, one on top and one on bottom. If you want to turn on the
    broiler element, that's a good idea, too because this premise works for two
    stones as well.
    Dee Dee
     
  15. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    >>
    >> Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    >> and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?


    The best tip of all -- use your oven cleaner; comes out brand-spankin' new.
    Dee Dee
     
  16. Carol Garbo

    Carol Garbo Guest

    Never, ever, clean your stone; it will turn dark in time, but it is
    supposed to do that. Be sure to preheat your stone for at least 30 to
    40 minutes before placing the pizza on it; I preheat mine for 45 minutes
    to an hour. Carol

    Our life may not always be the party we would have chosen, but while we
    are here, we may as well dance!
     
  17. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>> Also, how is a stone supposed to be cleaned? I have read some articles
    >>> and it seems a bit of a chore. Any tips?

    >
    > The best tip of all -- use your oven cleaner; comes out brand-spankin'
    > new.
    > Dee Dee

    Yikes, my sentence could be interpreted incorrectly.
    Turn you oven on to the oven-cleaner cycle, is what I mean.
    Dee Dee
     
  18. Carol Garbo wrote:

    > Never, ever, clean your stone; it will turn dark in time, but it is
    > supposed to do that. Be sure to preheat your stone for at least 30 to
    >
    > 40 minutes before placing the pizza on it; I preheat mine for 45
    > minutes
    > to an hour. Carol
    >
    > Our life may not always be the party we would have chosen, but while
    > we
    > are here, we may as well dance!


    I have never used a pizza stone and i wonder how my pizza pan with its
    corrugated bottom compares? I hesitate to purchase a stone as it is
    only used for that purpose, i can use my pizza pan for various things
    besides pizza, have not done so yet, but at least theoretically i
    could.
    ---
    JL
     
  19. Pete C.

    Pete C. Guest

    sf wrote:
    >
    > On 29 Dec 2005 05:51:21 +0100, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    > > On Wed 28 Dec 2005 09:36:22p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Edwin
    > > Pawlowski?
    > >
    > > >
    > > > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > >> Absolutely positively the most important element to successful use of a
    > > >> pizza stone is to run the oven as hot as it will go, 500 degrees or 550
    > > >> degrees is even better. It's still not as hot as a "real" pizza oven,
    > > >> but it's hot enough for the stone to work properly.
    > > >
    > > > And let the stone heat for a good amount of time too. The thicker the
    > > > stone, the more mass to heat so wait al east 15 to 20 minutes.

    > >
    > > You can force the temperature higher in some ovens by using the broiler
    > > setting after initially preheating the oven, since some ovens have a higher
    > > cut-off temperature for broiling. It's rarely documented in the manual.

    >
    > Honest. A good home made pizza doesn't need a blast furnace -
    > probably because the door doesn't open as many times as a commercial
    > oven does. I can do mine (size equivalent of an extra large) in about
    > 8 minutes at 475°.
    > --
    >
    > Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.


    Wrong, absolutely wrong. A commercial pizza oven needs a higher BTU
    output so that it is able to maintain proper temperature with all the
    door openings, but it still has to maintain a proper temperature which
    is generally over 600 degrees. At 475 you're just barely hot enough for
    a pizza stone to work acceptably, but you will get better results
    running the oven full bore.

    Pete C.
     
  20. Pete C.

    Pete C. Guest

    Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
    >
    > Carol Garbo wrote:
    >
    > > Never, ever, clean your stone; it will turn dark in time, but it is
    > > supposed to do that. Be sure to preheat your stone for at least 30 to
    > >
    > > 40 minutes before placing the pizza on it; I preheat mine for 45
    > > minutes
    > > to an hour. Carol
    > >
    > > Our life may not always be the party we would have chosen, but while
    > > we
    > > are here, we may as well dance!

    >
    > I have never used a pizza stone and i wonder how my pizza pan with its
    > corrugated bottom compares? I hesitate to purchase a stone as it is
    > only used for that purpose, i can use my pizza pan for various things
    > besides pizza, have not done so yet, but at least theoretically i
    > could.
    > ---
    > JL


    "Pizza" stones are useful for more than just for pizza. For one, just
    keeping it in the oven on the bottom rack will help stabilize the oven
    temperature for anything you are cooking and provides a shield from
    direct radiant heat of the element. The "pizza" stone can also be used
    for many types of breads.

    Pete C.
     
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