Please help with a high-end Ti or Carbon bike choice (7, Serotta, Moots, etc)

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Anthony Moody, Jun 4, 2003.

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  1. Hi Everyone,

    I posted this in the racing forum as I'd seen several 'which bike' threads there, but a few people
    scolded me. So here I am, cross-posting, asking the same question. Again...

    I'm a long time aluminum rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra set up) who is thinking hard about
    making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form. Primary reason: comfort (back
    pain, hand numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).

    I'm mostly a recreational rider who can be coaxed into a tri every now and then. Most rides are
    between 20 and 60 miles with my base loop being around 35 and an occassional century. Average speed
    around 15-16 on my base ride. I'm generally more of a spinner than a masher, though I like to drop
    the hammer sometimes and really fly (especially downhill ;)). I'm 5'11, 185 if that matters in the
    consideration.

    I'm very new to the various advanced materials, pros and cons of each, why/when to mix them (if
    ever), etc. I'd really appreciate any thoughts you guys have on the following makes/models, and why
    I might prefer one to the other (cost aside):

    -Seven Odonata (the Ti/Carbon mix) -Seven Alta (Ti) -Serotta Legend Ti -Serotto Ottrott (Ti/Carbon
    mix) -Calfee (carbon) -Moots (Ti suspension)

    Please don't flame me for being one of those guys with $5k burning a hole in their pocket. I know
    I'm in a fortunate situation, and I'd appreciate constructive thoughts.

    ALSO, I did a search here on one of the local 7 dealers near
    me...Cycle Path in Wainscott, NY (aka the Hamptons). As it turns out, the owner, Kurt Pfund, ruffled
    a bunch of feather here back in '99 for posting lots of 'for sale' posts in forums other than the
    marketplace forum. That aside, can anyone comment on an experience they had directly buying from
    them? They've been around a while it seems, and 7 spoke highly of them.

    Best and thanks in advance, Tony

    PS - please feel free to email me thoughts [email protected]
     
    Tags:


  2. Scic

    Scic Guest

    >From: [email protected]

    >Please don't flame me for being one of those guys with $5k burning a hole in their pocket.

    As long as you're going to spend that much...take a good look at the Merlin Cielo before you choose.

    Sig Chicago
     
  3. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    Before you spend the "big bucks" for ultimatium, have you been fitted? You cite "comfort" as a
    "primary reason" for getting a new bike. Obviously your current bike doesn't fit. Frame material is
    probably your least most important factor in choosing a new bike. You should find a shop that knows
    how to do a fitting, i.e., a shop that uses something like a serotta fit cycle and will measure you
    for things like toptube length, stem height and length, seat setback and height, etc. A good shop
    will figure what measurements you need and be able to provide support once you choose something.
    Buying the latest and greatest from one of those listed mfrs is not going to make you more
    "comfortable"....

    "Anthony Moody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > I posted this in the racing forum as I'd seen several 'which bike' threads there, but a few people
    > scolded me. So here I am, cross-posting, asking the same question. Again...
    >
    > I'm a long time aluminum rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra set up) who is thinking hard
    > about making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form. Primary reason: comfort
    > (back pain, hand numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).
    >
    > I'm mostly a recreational rider who can be coaxed into a tri every now and then. Most rides are
    > between 20 and 60 miles with my base loop being around 35 and an occassional century. Average
    > speed around 15-16 on my base ride. I'm generally more of a spinner than a masher, though I like
    > to drop the hammer sometimes and really fly (especially downhill ;)). I'm 5'11, 185 if that
    > matters in the consideration.
    >
    > I'm very new to the various advanced materials, pros and cons of each, why/when to mix them (if
    > ever), etc. I'd really appreciate any thoughts you guys have on the following makes/models, and
    > why I might prefer one to the other (cost aside):
    >
    > -Seven Odonata (the Ti/Carbon mix) -Seven Alta (Ti) -Serotta Legend Ti -Serotto Ottrott (Ti/Carbon
    > mix) -Calfee (carbon) -Moots (Ti suspension)
    >
    > Please don't flame me for being one of those guys with $5k burning a hole in their pocket. I know
    > I'm in a fortunate situation, and I'd appreciate constructive thoughts.
    >
    > ALSO, I did a search here on one of the local 7 dealers near
    > me...Cycle Path in Wainscott, NY (aka the Hamptons). As it turns out, the owner, Kurt Pfund,
    > ruffled a bunch of feather here back in '99 for posting lots of 'for sale' posts in forums
    > other than the marketplace forum. That aside, can anyone comment on an experience they had
    > directly buying from them? They've been around a while it seems, and 7 spoke highly of them.
    >
    > Best and thanks in advance, Tony
    >
    > PS - please feel free to email me thoughts [email protected]
     
  4. Anthony Moody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I'm a long time aluminum rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra
    set
    > up) who is thinking hard about making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form.
    > Primary reason: comfort (back pain,
    hand
    > numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).

    > Please don't flame me for being one of those guys with $5k burning a hole in their pocket. I know
    > I'm in a fortunate situation, and I'd appreciate constructive thoughts.

    In terms of your question, the most important things for ride comfort I can think of are good bit
    fit, fatter tires, a good saddle and, perhaps, flexy handlebars. The latter can be disturbing at
    times, so perhaps you needn't pursue that one. The rest of the things needn't cost a lot, so they
    might not be what you are after. But they will help with your problem.

    If I were you I'd try to find a local shop with a lot of experience in fitting people to bikes. Take
    their advice. If you have time you can go to Newport RI to see Bill Petersen at Foot Fitness for a
    fit, or perhaps John Allis at Belmont Wheelworks in Belmont MA. Spend the money to travel and see
    one of them.

    Spend money on a variety of saddles so you can experiment. If needed, spend money on a variety of
    different length stems so you can experiement with that part of your position (or even buy or rent
    an adjustable stem to help decide).

    Spend money on perhaps a little bike coaching or flexibility and core strength training with a
    personal trainer to deal with your back pain. Many people are weak in this area and that can
    contribute to back pain. Maybe take a better approach to nutrition/training to lose some weight and
    take stress off your body, with professional advice if you want to spend money.

    You may find that your current bike, with fit and saddle adjustments and larger tires and improved
    core strength and lost weight (on your body) may work fine.

    Few of these things will result in any outward signs of your having spent a lot of money, even if
    you do (for travel, personal training and coaching, experiments with saddles) but you want to spend
    money for results, not to be conspicuous, right?

    JT

    --
    *******************************************
    NB: reply-to address is munged

    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    *******************************************
     
  5. My choice would be a Calfee Tetra or Dragonfly. Bonding ti and carbon together makes no sense to me
    other than for marketing.

    If you want the finest weld quality there is, then MOOTs would be your choice.

    But fit is the most important but each mentioned are available in custom.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    If you're really looking for something "hi-end" find someone who is working with the new 6/4
    seamless Reynolds Ti. Guru is, and I believe Dean is as well.

    Otherwise, go Serotta.

    App

    [email protected] (Anthony Moody) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > I posted this in the racing forum as I'd seen several 'which bike' threads there, but a few people
    > scolded me. So here I am, cross-posting, asking the same question. Again...
    >
    > I'm a long time aluminum rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra set up) who is thinking hard
    > about making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form. Primary reason: comfort
    > (back pain, hand numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).
    >
    > I'm mostly a recreational rider who can be coaxed into a tri every now and then. Most rides are
    > between 20 and 60 miles with my base loop being around 35 and an occassional century. Average
    > speed around 15-16 on my base ride. I'm generally more of a spinner than a masher, though I like
    > to drop the hammer sometimes and really fly (especially downhill ;)). I'm 5'11, 185 if that
    > matters in the consideration.
    >
    > I'm very new to the various advanced materials, pros and cons of each, why/when to mix them (if
    > ever), etc. I'd really appreciate any thoughts you guys have on the following makes/models, and
    > why I might prefer one to the other (cost aside):
    >
    > -Seven Odonata (the Ti/Carbon mix) -Seven Alta (Ti) -Serotta Legend Ti -Serotto Ottrott (Ti/Carbon
    > mix) -Calfee (carbon) -Moots (Ti suspension)
    >
    > Please don't flame me for being one of those guys with $5k burning a hole in their pocket. I know
    > I'm in a fortunate situation, and I'd appreciate constructive thoughts.
    >
    > ALSO, I did a search here on one of the local 7 dealers near
    > me...Cycle Path in Wainscott, NY (aka the Hamptons). As it turns out, the owner, Kurt Pfund,
    > ruffled a bunch of feather here back in '99 for posting lots of 'for sale' posts in forums
    > other than the marketplace forum. That aside, can anyone comment on an experience they had
    > directly buying from them? They've been around a while it seems, and 7 spoke highly of them.
    >
    > Best and thanks in advance, Tony
    >
    > PS - please feel free to email me thoughts [email protected]
     
  7. Buying a very costly new bike without being 100% sure of the fit really is not wise if you have a
    choice, and you do.

    The smart way to deal with your situation is to change your existing bike around until you get
    comfortable by changing stem, saddle, bars, etc., maybe with the aid of a good LBS or coach. Then
    (and only then), if you want a nice new bike, you will know exactly what measurements truly fit you.

    The "fit kit" is as much about marketing as it is about getting a good fit. A good bike shop will
    use it as a starting point, not the definitive answer. No-one can create a bike that fits you well
    from some static measurements, you also have to know what positions you want to ride in, how you
    like the bars angled, the brake levers positioned, etc. And the only way to know that is by riding
    and adjusting, riding and adjusting until you get it right.

    Even if you get a good position by adjusting your existing bike, you may still end up with an
    excessively long or short stem, handling issues, or some other aesthetic problem that will justify
    your purchase of a new bike. If you don't want to go up one tyre size (which will make a bigger
    difference to "ride" or "feel" than frame material), you can use the material switch as another
    justification.

    BTW, Don't rush to get a custom frame - there are enough choices of stock geometry out there to fit
    the majority of folks and you can often save a lot of money (OK, you can spend more money on trick
    parts) by sticking with a stock frame (plus delivery is quicker).
     
  8. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Messages:
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    Here's a good review on the Ottrott - If I had 5K my wife didn't know about I think it would be my choice. The review even mentions some of your concerns.

    LINK

    The Ottrott has the carbon fiber/Ti mix that doesn't make sense to Peter C. but the reviewer found it had a pretty sweet ride and they're all customs.
     
  9. Thanks everyone, all good food for thoughts. For sure I think my first step will be to do some work
    to get my current bike set up better for me. I think at the minimum I need to raise the handle bar
    b/c the seat is noticeably higher. Unfortunately, it seems to be the 'right' height in terms of leg
    extension and angle...and the headset (?) is raised as high as it'll go for now. So, I guess that
    means a taller headset (or some kind of extender?) is required at a bare minimum.

    I've gotten some suggestions by email as well re: different tire widths, etc. so I'll look into
    that as well.

    Best, Tony
     
  10. [email protected] (Anthony Moody) wrote in message
    > ALSO, I did a search here on one of the local 7 dealers near
    > me...Cycle Path in Wainscott, NY (aka the Hamptons). As it turns out, the owner, Kurt Pfund,
    > ruffled a bunch of feather here back in '99 for posting lots of 'for sale' posts in forums
    > other than the marketplace forum.

    Posting to the wrong group once is not terrible, just a sign of ignorance. But repeatedly posting
    for sale stuff in the wrong groups is a sign of arrogance or untrustworthiness. So if it's true that
    this Pfund guy posted lots of for sale stuff in inappropriate groups, I'd be wary of doing business
    with someone like that -- he's a spammer. How could you trust him?

    JT
     
  11. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    Here's a few articles you should read:

    http://www.rivbike.com/html/bikes_framesize.html

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/frames/

    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

    and yes, I agree, wider tires (700x25 or even 28) will definitely be more comfortable as wider tires
    = more air volume = lower psi = more comfort

    "Anthony Moody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks everyone, all good food for thoughts. For sure I think my first step will be to do some
    > work to get my current bike set up better for me. I think at the minimum I need to raise the
    > handle bar
    > b/c the seat is noticeably higher. Unfortunately, it seems to be the 'right' height in terms of
    > leg extension and angle...and the headset (?) is raised as high as it'll go for now. So, I guess
    > that means a taller headset (or some kind of extender?) is required at a bare minimum.
    >
    > I've gotten some suggestions by email as well re: different tire widths, etc. so I'll look into
    > that as well.
    >
    > Best, Tony
     
  12. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    Here's a variation of another's advice:

    The second most important feature of a frame, before material or builder, is color.

    The most important is fit.

    That's my joke, but it's true. Fit is so much more important than apperance that that should be your
    first concern. And I ride a bike without paint, a rather dull grey. It fits me well.

    So before you bother deciding how to spend thousands for a "comfortable" frame learn what makes
    comfort. All road frames without suspension are essentially rigid and absorb much less than 5% of
    the road shock. Someone actually tested the flex and I only recall it gave results obvious to any
    engineer. You may feel some lateral flex when cranking out of the saddle but vertical flex is about
    the same for all road frames.

    -Bruce

    "Anthony Moody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > I posted this in the racing forum as I'd seen several 'which bike' threads there, but a few people
    > scolded me. So here I am, cross-posting, asking the same question. Again...
    >
    > I'm a long time aluminum rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra set up) who is thinking hard
    > about making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form. Primary reason: comfort
    > (back pain, hand numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).
    >
    > I'm mostly a recreational rider who can be coaxed into a tri every now and then. Most rides are
    > between 20 and 60 miles with my base loop being around 35 and an occassional century. Average
    > speed around 15-16 on my base ride. I'm generally more of a spinner than a masher, though I like
    > to drop the hammer sometimes and really fly (especially downhill ;)). I'm 5'11, 185 if that
    > matters in the consideration.
    >
    > I'm very new to the various advanced materials, pros and cons of each, why/when to mix them (if
    > ever), etc. I'd really appreciate any thoughts you guys have on the following makes/models, and
    > why I might prefer one to the other (cost aside):
    >
    > -Seven Odonata (the Ti/Carbon mix) -Seven Alta (Ti) -Serotta Legend Ti -Serotto Ottrott (Ti/Carbon
    > mix) -Calfee (carbon) -Moots (Ti suspension)
    >
    > Please don't flame me for being one of those guys with $5k burning a hole in their pocket. I know
    > I'm in a fortunate situation, and I'd appreciate constructive thoughts.
    >
    > ALSO, I did a search here on one of the local 7 dealers near
    > me...Cycle Path in Wainscott, NY (aka the Hamptons). As it turns out, the owner, Kurt Pfund,
    > ruffled a bunch of feather here back in '99 for posting lots of 'for sale' posts in forums
    > other than the marketplace forum. That aside, can anyone comment on an experience they had
    > directly buying from them? They've been around a while it seems, and 7 spoke highly of them.
    >
    > Best and thanks in advance, Tony
    >
    > PS - please feel free to email me thoughts [email protected]
     
  13. James Roach

    James Roach Guest

    [email protected] (Anthony Moody) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > I posted this in the racing forum as I'd seen several 'which bike' threads there, but a few people
    > scolded me. So here I am, cross-posting, asking the same question. Again...
    >
    > I'm a long time aluminum rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra set up) who is thinking hard
    > about making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form. Primary reason: comfort
    > (back pain, hand numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).

    Anthony,

    If cost is no object and comfort is the primary reason for your puchase why not look at a custom
    build steel frame. There are several builders in your area (Richard Sachs-CT for one) that might be
    worth investigating. The weight difference between the exotics (Carbon, Ti) and steel is, IMHO,
    minimal to all but the elite riders. A well set up steel bike can be a truely graceful ride. Besides
    who do you envy more, the person riding the fairly common Litespeed or the rider who has his name
    written on the top tube of a hand crafted, one of a kind steed.

    Good Luck,

    Ciao James
     
  14. Pete-<< If you're really looking for something "hi-end" find someone who is working with the new 6/4
    seamless Reynolds Ti. Guru is, and I believe Dean is as well.

    As well as Moots altho you don't get much ride wise or weight wise for a lot more money...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  15. Diablo-<< The Ottrott has the carbon fiber/Ti mix that doesn't make sense to Peter C. but the
    reviewer found it had a pretty sweet ride and they're all customs.

    Serotta makes standard OttRotts, and I never said it wasn't a 'sweet ride' but sacrificing longevity
    and trying to make the ti ride 'better' with glued in carbon makes little sense.

    Is the carbon for 'suppleness' or 'stiffness'? Or for 'selling'?

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  16. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Diablo-<< The Ottrott has the carbon fiber/Ti mix that doesn't make sense
    to
    > Peter C. but the reviewer found it had a pretty sweet ride and they're all customs.
    >
    > Serotta makes standard OttRotts, and I never said it wasn't a 'sweet ride'
    but
    > sacrificing longevity and trying to make the ti ride 'better' with glued
    in
    > carbon makes little sense.
    >
    > Is the carbon for 'suppleness' or 'stiffness'? Or for 'selling'?
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm

    I was down at one of the shops in La Mesa, CA the other day and saw the Trek (Lemond?) version of
    the OttRott. CF topside, Ti bottomside. Interesting theory.

    Not sure what the heck you need to do something like that for except to say you've done it.

    Mike
     
  17. > I was down at one of the shops in La Mesa, CA the other day and saw the
    Trek
    > (Lemond?) version of the OttRott. CF topside, Ti bottomside. Interesting theory.
    >
    > Not sure what the heck you need to do something like that for except to
    say
    > you've done it.

    The reasoning behind it is that carbon and ti act very differently to forces trying to twist
    (rotate) them, with metals in general being able to "wind up" a bit along their length, while carbon
    absolutely positively resists doing so. Putting a titanium "spine" along the bottom of the frame
    gives you a feeling when pedaling that's got that springy feeling that some like.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Diablo-<< The Ottrott has the carbon fiber/Ti mix that doesn't make
    sense
    > to
    > > Peter C. but the reviewer found it had a pretty sweet ride and they're all customs.
    > >
    > > Serotta makes standard OttRotts, and I never said it wasn't a 'sweet
    ride'
    > but
    > > sacrificing longevity and trying to make the ti ride 'better' with glued
    > in
    > > carbon makes little sense.
    > >
    > > Is the carbon for 'suppleness' or 'stiffness'? Or for 'selling'?
    > >
    > >
    > > Peter Chisholm
    >
    > I was down at one of the shops in La Mesa, CA the other day and saw the
    Trek
    > (Lemond?) version of the OttRott. CF topside, Ti bottomside. Interesting theory.
    >
    > Not sure what the heck you need to do something like that for except to
    say
    > you've done it.
    >
    > Mike
     
  18. C. Eastman

    C. Eastman Guest

    "> You may feel some lateral flex when cranking out of the saddle but
    > vertical flex is about the same for all road frames"

    - Thank YOU! You gotta love these guys who are writing articles talking about the "smooth" feeling
    or "buttery" ride. One guy riding dirt roads on his $5000 Ottrott saying, "Even on dirt roads it
    just floats along." Whatever, I guess you have to say something to make a bike sell.

    "Bruce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Here's a variation of another's advice:
    >
    > The second most important feature of a frame, before material or builder,
    is
    > color.
    >
    > The most important is fit.
    >
    > That's my joke, but it's true. Fit is so much more important than
    apperance
    > that that should be your first concern. And I ride a bike without paint,
    a
    > rather dull grey. It fits me well.
    >
    > So before you bother deciding how to spend thousands for a "comfortable" frame learn what makes
    > comfort. All road frames without suspension are essentially rigid and absorb much less than 5% of
    > the road shock. Someone actually tested the flex and I only recall it gave results obvious to any
    > engineer. You may feel some lateral flex when cranking out of the saddle
    but
    > vertical flex is about the same for all road frames.
    >
    > -Bruce
    >
    >
    > "Anthony Moody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi Everyone,
    > >
    > > I posted this in the racing forum as I'd seen several 'which bike' threads there, but a few
    > > people scolded me. So here I am, cross-posting, asking the same question. Again...
    > >
    > > I'm a long time aluminum rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra set up) who is thinking hard
    > > about making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form. Primary reason:
    > > comfort (back pain, hand numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).
    > >
    > > I'm mostly a recreational rider who can be coaxed into a tri every now and then. Most rides are
    > > between 20 and 60 miles with my base loop being around 35 and an occassional century. Average
    > > speed around 15-16 on my base ride. I'm generally more of a spinner than a masher, though I like
    > > to drop the hammer sometimes and really fly (especially downhill ;)). I'm 5'11, 185 if that
    > > matters in the consideration.
    > >
    > > I'm very new to the various advanced materials, pros and cons of each, why/when to mix them (if
    > > ever), etc. I'd really appreciate any thoughts you guys have on the following makes/models, and
    > > why I might prefer one to the other (cost aside):
    > >
    > > -Seven Odonata (the Ti/Carbon mix) -Seven Alta (Ti) -Serotta Legend Ti -Serotto Ottrott
    > > (Ti/Carbon mix) -Calfee (carbon) -Moots (Ti suspension)
    > >
    > > Please don't flame me for being one of those guys with $5k burning a hole in their pocket. I
    > > know I'm in a fortunate situation, and I'd appreciate constructive thoughts.
    > >
    > > ALSO, I did a search here on one of the local 7 dealers near
    > > me...Cycle Path in Wainscott, NY (aka the Hamptons). As it turns out, the owner, Kurt Pfund,
    > > ruffled a bunch of feather here back in '99 for posting lots of 'for sale' posts in forums
    > > other than the marketplace forum. That aside, can anyone comment on an experience they had
    > > directly buying from them? They've been around a while it seems, and 7 spoke highly of them.
    > >
    > > Best and thanks in advance, Tony
    > >
    > > PS - please feel free to email me thoughts [email protected]
     
  19. Dan

    Dan Guest

    [email protected] (Anthony Moody) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    Primary reason: comfort (back pain, hand
    > numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).
    >
    > I'm mostly a recreational rider who can be coaxed into a tri every now and then. Most rides are
    > between 20 and 60 miles with my base loop being around 35 and an occassional century. Average
    > speed around 15-16 on my base ride. I'm generally more of a spinner than a masher, though I like
    > to drop the hammer sometimes and really fly (especially downhill ;)). I'm 5'11, 185 if that
    > matters in the consideration.
    >

    Regarding comfort, have you considered a recumbent bike or trike? No more pain for me.

    There are plenty of choices of types, materials and components in the price range you mentioned.

    See http://www.bentrideronline.com or http://recumbents.com for more info.
     
  20. Tdwfl

    Tdwfl Guest

    >[email protected] (Anthony Moody) wrote: >I'm a long time aluminum
    rider (currently Klein Quantum w/Ultegra set
    >up) who is thinking hard about making the jump to either Ti, Carbon, or a mix, and in custom form.
    >Primary reason: comfort (back pain, hand numbness), fit, ride quality (silky smooth please).

    Instead of jumping into a new bike why don't you try tuning your existing ride. It sounds like a
    decent bike that may benefit from a different seat/seatpost, stem bars and wheels or tires. A decent
    bike shop ought to be able to directly point you to something to solve the hand numbness and maybe
    recommend a seat or seatpost that will smooth things out. I've been using an Easton EC90 carbon
    handlebar for a while and it's solved my hand numbness and fatigue and recently I bought a Fizik
    Alliante saddle with carbon rails. I paid almost retail for it and it wasn't love a first sit but
    I've really gotten comfortable on it. Don't get me wrong, I love buying new bikes but I learned the
    hard way that getting a new bike can be a step backwards in comfort. Then you have to start the
    whole tuning process over again. If you have a reasonably good starting point on you existing bike
    then try that first. If it doesn't work you'll have some nice components to switch over to your new
    bike. Good luck.

    Tim
     
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