Please, I need basic bike buying advice



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B

Bud

Guest
I'm in the market for a bike. I'm a male in my early thirties, in pretty good shape, and I have not
owned a bike in the last 12 years or so, so I'm totally out of what good/hot and what's not. My last
bike was a 5-speed Schwinn. I'm probably looking for a basic but decent road bike built by a
reputable manufacturer. It will be used mostly for joy riding around town and on paved park trails.
I think I'd like a 5-speed again. Super-light bikes and other mega-performance considerations are
not that important, although I wouldn't mind a little sporty-ness to it.

What should I consider? Which manufacturers are big now? What do you recommend?

Thanks.
 
B

B. Sanders

Guest
"Bud" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I'm in the market for a bike. I'm a male in my early thirties, in pretty good shape, and I have
> not owned a bike in the last 12 years or so, so I'm totally out of what good/hot and what's not.
> My last bike was a 5-speed Schwinn. I'm probably looking for a basic but decent road bike built by
> a reputable manufacturer. It will be used mostly for joy riding around town and on paved park
> trails. I think I'd like a 5-speed again. Super-light bikes and other mega-performance
> considerations are not that important, although I wouldn't mind a little sporty-ness to it.

Define "sportyness." What does this mean to you?

Do you want to sit upright, for a better view, or do you prefer a lower, faster riding stance?

"Superlight" and "light" are worlds apart in price; but not very different in weight (oddly enough).
I recommend something like the Bianchi Strada - basically a road bike with flat handlebars like.
It's going to be very fast (almost as fast as a road bike). It will accept 700x32c treaded tires for
riding the limestone trails, and will serve as a road bike with drop bars should you decide you want
some more speed on the smooth roads.

As for what kind of frame material: I would go with steel, because it's both cheaper and more
comfortable than aluminum (in the price range that you're likely to be considering, that is).

If you choose a bike with fender and rack eyelets on the frame and fork, then you can easily bolt on
a cargo rack and use your new bike to get groceries or haul books from the library, or take your kid
for a ride. Most road bikes and many mountain bikes do not have rack and fender eyelets.

> What should I consider? Which manufacturers are big now? What do you recommend?

Choose a bike from area bike shops. Whatever brands they carry, that's what you should choose. Don't
buy a bike from an online retailer or Ebay - getting the correct fit, and having a shop stand behind
your purchase is very important for your overall enjoyment of the sport.

-Barry
 
F

Fabrizio Mazzol

Guest
"Bud" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I'm in the market for a bike.

The division one team Euskaltel-Euskadi are using Columbus's top of the line Starship tubed Orbea
frames, you can get these in the Euskaltel or Pro Mediteranium finish.

Just remember, for the best looking frame never buy one that measures more than 52cm from the center
of the bottom bracket to the center of the top tube.
 
M

Mike Kruger

Guest
"Bud" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I'm in the market for a bike. I'm a male in my early thirties, in pretty good shape, and I have
> not owned a bike in the last 12 years or so, so I'm totally out of what good/hot and what's not.
> My last bike was a 5-speed Schwinn. I'm probably looking for a basic but decent road bike built by
> a reputable manufacturer. It will be used mostly for joy riding around town and on paved park
> trails. I think I'd like a 5-speed again. Super-light bikes and other mega-performance
> considerations are not that important, although I wouldn't mind a little sporty-ness to it.
>
Schwinn: not big now, except at Walmart. Some good brands: Trek, Specialized, Bianchi, Lemond,
Raleigh, Giant; there are others

You won't find 5 speeds anymore. It's hard to tell from your post whether you want a "road bike"
(drop handlebars) or a bike to ride on the road (including, say, hybrids or even a mountain bike
with slick tires). These others would have flat handlebars.

Best bet would be to find a nearby bike shop where you can get some good advice and test out some
models. (This won't, alas, work if you are 6'3" like me, because there will be little in inventory
that will fit. It also won't work if you walk into a store that doesn't carry a single "road bike"
any more.) If you live near an REI store, that might be a good choice because they carry a variety
of types of road bikes that are priced pretty well.

One important consideration is whether you have friends you are likely to ride with; if so, a bike
of the same general style as theirs is a good choice.
 
W

Waxxer

Guest
This is really good advice. Also stay away from low end or volume sales shops. Mike J will do a
great job for you at Chain Reaction. Also check Palo Alto Bicycle and Cupertino bicycle--if your in
this geography, (bay area). "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Bud" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > I'm in the market for a bike. I'm a male in my early thirties, in
pretty
> > good shape, and I have not owned a bike in the last 12 years or so, so
I'm
> > totally out of what good/hot and what's not. My last bike was a 5-speed Schwinn. I'm probably
> > looking for a basic but decent road bike built by
a
> > reputable manufacturer. It will be used mostly for joy riding around
town
> > and on paved park trails. I think I'd like a 5-speed again.
Super-light
> > bikes and other mega-performance considerations are not that important, although I wouldn't mind
> > a little sporty-ness to it.
>
> Define "sportyness." What does this mean to you?
>
> Do you want to sit upright, for a better view, or do you prefer a lower, faster riding stance?
>
> "Superlight" and "light" are worlds apart in price; but not very different in weight (oddly
> enough). I recommend something like the Bianchi Strada - basically a road bike with flat
> handlebars like. It's going to be very
fast
> (almost as fast as a road bike). It will accept 700x32c treaded tires for riding the limestone
> trails, and will serve as a road bike with drop bars should you decide you want some more speed on
> the smooth roads.
>
> As for what kind of frame material: I would go with steel, because it's both cheaper and more
> comfortable than aluminum (in the price range that you're likely to be considering, that is).
>
> If you choose a bike with fender and rack eyelets on the frame and fork, then you can easily bolt
> on a cargo rack and use your new bike to get groceries or haul books from the library, or take
> your kid for a ride.
Most
> road bikes and many mountain bikes do not have rack and fender eyelets.
>
> > What should I consider? Which manufacturers are big now? What do you recommend?
>
> Choose a bike from area bike shops. Whatever brands they carry, that's
what
> you should choose. Don't buy a bike from an online retailer or Ebay - getting the correct fit,
> and having a shop stand behind your purchase is very important for your overall enjoyment of
> the sport.
>
> -Barry
 
J

Jim Edgar

Guest
waxxer at [email protected] wrote on 3/18/03 7:34 PM:

> This is really good advice. Also stay away from low end or volume sales shops. Mike J will do a
> great job for you at Chain Reaction. Also check Palo Alto Bicycle and Cupertino bicycle--if your
> in this geography, (bay area).

Even if you aren't in the South Bay Area, go to their website for an excellent article on "How to
Test Ride" a bicycle.

Here's the direct link:

http://www.chainreaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm

Good luck!

- Jim
 
M

Mike Kruger

Guest
"Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> Just remember, for the best looking frame never buy one that measures more than 52cm from the
> center of the bottom bracket to the center of the top tube.

Yes, far better to have that surgery to shorten your legs than have to ride a 62 cm frame that fits
your current body.

;)
 
B

B. Sanders

Guest
"Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Bud" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > I'm in the market for a bike.
>
> The division one team Euskaltel-Euskadi are using Columbus's top of the line Starship tubed Orbea
> frames, you can get these in the Euskaltel or Pro Mediteranium finish.
>
> Just remember, for the best looking frame never buy one that measures more than 52cm from the
> center of the bottom bracket to the center of the top tube.

Don't mind the troll. (He thinks this is cute.)

-B
 
L

Luigi De Guzman

Guest
"Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> "Bud" <[email protected]ease.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > I'm in the market for a bike.
>
> The division one team Euskaltel-Euskadi are using Columbus's top of the line Starship tubed Orbea
> frames, you can get these in the Euskaltel or Pro Mediteranium finish.
>

GORA EUSKADI!

man. If only I could but aspire to the coolness that is Euskaltel/Euskadi. I was rooting for them in
the Tour last year. Kinda hoped that Zubeldia would take the white jersey, but ah well.

You have to admit, though--Euskadi has the best fans.

-Luigi
 
F

Fabrizio Mazzol

Guest
"B. Sanders" <[email protected]> .org...
>> Don't mind the troll. (He thinks this is cute.)
>

Good eye there Sanders, I never picked up on the fact that Bud's post was in fact just troll bait.

Anyway, aren't you the recumbent rider type?
 
F

Fabrizio Mazzol

Guest
"Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message

> GORA EUSKADI! Kinda hoped that Zubeldia would take the white jersey, but ah well.
>

Well I'm more that just a little bit bitter over the fact that Julian Gorospe signed Dioni
Galparsoro instead of me, and what are Julian and Ruben Gorospe thinking when they keep someone like
Egoi Martinez de Esteban on the payroll when he only has a lousy 12 UCI points?

Anyway, I would have had second thoughts about signing a one or two year pro contract with a team
that has that much orange in their team kit.
 
P

Per ElmsäTer

Guest
"Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Just remember, for the best looking frame never buy one that measures more than 52cm from the
> center of the bottom bracket to the center of the top tube.
>

Is it Ok to cut out part of the middle of the measuring tape and joining it back with rubber in such
a way that it always measures 52 cm?

--
Perre

Replace the DOTs to reply
 
S

Stephen Harding

Guest
Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:

> Anyway, I would have had second thoughts about signing a one or two year pro contract with a team
> that has that much orange in their team kit.

What colors would be most desireable when considering team memberships?

I'm not a racing man myself, and I'd no doubt would look the real Fred on my Trek-520 (it's a pretty
cool green color though), when biking with the local club, but I must say I've found myself thinking
that might be a good move because their club jerseys are a very nice combo of light and dark blue.

Orange would seem to be second class (a cry for attention, not display of cycling competence), but
the light/dark blue combo just screams "attack and mangle" to me.

I'm really out of my element here. What's the Euro-Pro take on this Fab?

SMH
 
A

Alex Colvin

Guest
>> Anyway, I would have had second thoughts about signing a one or two year pro contract with a team
>> that has that much orange in their team kit.

>What colors would be most desireable when considering team memberships?

any teams that just wrap the tubes in black electrical tape.
--
mac the naïf
 
F

Fabrizio Mazzol

Guest
"Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message u...
>
> > What colors would be most desireable when considering team
> memberships?

Don't worry about the colour too much, just make very sure the jersey looks pro and then build the
rest of your kit around that.

For instance, I've gone really heavy on Kelme kit because it fits in great with my jersey.

Don't worry if you get last year's pro kit, just don't go retro and end up looking like LeMond by
wearing old ADR/Agrigel stuff from the late '80s.

Once you do this you will notice a nice change in yourself and will from then on look down on
recreational rider 'types' and point out other riders lack of form.

You should be able to wein about 85% of your riding buddies out of your life, they just didn't make
the cut. In fact, I'm still improving and already this season three people I trained with last year
don't feel good enough to ride with me anymore!

And the best for last, just watch the reaction you get from female car drivers, it's a wonderful
feeling when you make it.

On my last training session yesterday I scored a really nice double take from a women driving one of
those new imports with that little wing thing on the trunk lid.
 
B

Benjamin Lewis

Guest
Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:

> Don't worry if you get last year's pro kit, just don't go retro and end up looking like LeMond by
> wearing old ADR/Agrigel stuff from the late '80s.

Although we know you can pull it off, don't you think it's irresponsible to encourage others to go
with dated gear? Not everyone can make a CAAD2 look good, after all.

--
Benjamin Lewis

Marriage causes dating problems.
 
F

Fabrizio Mazzol

Guest
"Benjamin Lewis" <[email protected]> .

>
> Although we know you can pull it off, don't you think it's irresponsible
to
> encourage others to go with dated gear? Not everyone can make a CAAD2
look
> good, after all.

An elite level roadie should be able to make it work riding 6061-T6 AL, power pyramid downtube,
butted and swagged chainstays, but if you just can't cut it, then yes, you may have to go up to
Cannondale's new Optimo tubing and 90 gram hourglass seatstays.
 
G

G . I . Jesus

Guest
On Thu, 20 Mar 2003 16:58:07 GMT, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> from Shaw Residential
Internet wrote:

>
>"Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message u...
>>
>> > What colors would be most desireable when considering team
>> memberships?
>
>Don't worry about the colour too much, just make very sure the jersey looks pro and then build the
>rest of your kit around that.

Also, make sure there's no stomach pushing out the jersey over the elastic waistband of the shorts.
Nothing says Fred louder than a belly.

--
http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace The Osmonds! You are all Osmonds!! Throwing
up on a freeway at dawn!!!
1:14:56 PM 20 March 2003
 
F

Fabrizio Mazzol

Guest
"Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message

> Is it Ok to cut out part of the middle of the measuring tape and joining
it
> back with rubber in such a way that it always measures 52 cm?

You just can't hide the poor looks of a large frame, it's all in the top tube- down tube - head tube
junction area. It just look's dorky having all that dead space made up by the head tube, and a large
frame causes the head tube angle to go to 73 or 74 degrees from the better looking 72 degrees.

Take a couple of my peers for example, Axel Merckx and George Hincapie. These two insist on riding
those silly large frames every year.

Axel dropped out of this year's Paris-Nice on stage 6 while being buried way back in 25th place,
even someone like Alexandre Botcharov of team Ag2R Prevoyance was ahead of him in the standings.
I'll tell you with the training I've done this winter 25 back at that race wouldn't be making me
very happy, and the day Botcharov beats me in a 2.HC race will be the day I retire. Axel isn't even
riding in this weekend's Milan-San Remo.

George is out of action because of a viral infection! George hasn't really done anything worth
talking about since he won the San Francisco Grand Prix way back in '01.
 
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