Please ignore this troll

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Alfred Ryder, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Alfred Ryder

    Alfred Ryder Guest

    My old steel frame was getting floppy with age so I bought a
    fat-tube aluminum frame. But aluminum gives such a harsh
    ride that I bought a carbon fiber frame. Carbon gives a much
    better ride than aluminum. And I am having trouble finding
    20mm tires that have a deep enough tread to give me
    reasonable traction. I did find wheels with 16 spokes that
    enable me to go much faster. I worried about so few spokes
    until I learned that my rims are heavily anodized. I also
    removed the front brake, which is too dangerous to use. The
    other problem I have is finding a helmet that has enough big
    vents. And no-way would I ride without a helmet because the
    roads are really dangerous and the helmet will save my life.
    I stay on sidewalks and paths, though, so I should be OK. I
    maintain the bike well, taking the chain off after every
    ride and soaking it in bucket of gasoline in the basement. I
    also take the crank set lever arms off after every ride,
    make sure there is no grease on the tapers, and then tighten
    the bolts as hard as I can. My saddle really hurts me so I
    keep lowering it. It is the softest one I could find, but it
    still hurts.
     
    Tags:


  2. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Alfred Ryder" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My old steel frame was getting floppy with age so I bought
    >a fat-tube aluminum frame. But aluminum gives such a harsh
    >ride that I bought a carbon fiber frame. Carbon gives a
    >much better ride than aluminum. And I am having trouble
    >finding 20mm tires that have a deep enough tread to give me
    >reasonable traction. I did find wheels with 16 spokes that
    >enable me to go much faster. I worried about so few spokes
    >until I learned that my rims are heavily anodized. I also
    >removed the front brake, which is too dangerous to use. The
    >other problem I have is finding a helmet that has enough
    >big vents. And no-way would I ride without a helmet because
    >the roads are really dangerous and the helmet will save my
    >life. I stay on sidewalks and paths, though, so I should be
    >OK. I maintain the bike well, taking the chain off after
    >every ride and soaking it in bucket of gasoline in the
    >basement. I also take the crank set lever arms off after
    >every ride, make sure there is no grease on the tapers, and
    >then tighten the bolts as hard as I can. My saddle really
    >hurts me so I keep lowering it. It is the softest one I
    >could find, but it still hurts.

    Bet it's a compact frame.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of
    the $695 ti frame
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Alfred Ryder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >My old steel frame was getting floppy with age so I bought
    >a fat-tube aluminum frame. But aluminum gives such a harsh
    >ride that I bought a carbon fiber frame. Carbon gives a
    >much better ride than aluminum. And I am having trouble
    >finding 20mm tires that have a deep enough tread to give me
    >reasonable traction. I did find wheels with 16 spokes that
    >enable me to go much faster. I worried about so few spokes
    >until I learned that my rims are heavily anodized. I also
    >removed the front brake, which is too dangerous to use. The
    >other problem I have is finding a helmet that has enough
    >big vents. And no-way would I ride without a helmet because
    >the roads are really dangerous and the helmet will save my
    >life. I stay on sidewalks and paths, though, so I should be
    >OK. I maintain the bike well, taking the chain off after
    >every ride and soaking it in bucket of gasoline in the
    >basement. I also take the crank set lever arms off after
    >every ride, make sure there is no grease on the tapers, and
    >then tighten the bolts as hard as I can. My saddle really
    >hurts me so I keep lowering it. It is the softest one I
    >could find, but it still hurts.

    You clearly NEED full suspension.

    --Paul
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 02:30:08 GMT, [email protected]
    (Paul Southworth) may have said:

    >In article
    ><[email protected]>,
    >Alfred Ryder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>My old steel frame was getting floppy with age so I bought
    >>a fat-tube aluminum frame. But aluminum gives such a harsh
    >>ride that I bought a carbon fiber frame. Carbon gives a
    >>much better ride than aluminum. And I am having trouble
    >>finding 20mm tires that have a deep enough tread to give
    >>me reasonable traction. I did find wheels with 16 spokes
    >>that enable me to go much faster. I worried about so few
    >>spokes until I learned that my rims are heavily anodized.
    >>I also removed the front brake, which is too dangerous to
    >>use. The other problem I have is finding a helmet that has
    >>enough big vents. And no-way would I ride without a helmet
    >>because the roads are really dangerous and the helmet will
    >>save my life. I stay on sidewalks and paths, though, so I
    >>should be OK. I maintain the bike well, taking the chain
    >>off after every ride and soaking it in bucket of gasoline
    >>in the basement. I also take the crank set lever arms off
    >>after every ride, make sure there is no grease on the
    >>tapers, and then tighten the bolts as hard as I can. My
    >>saddle really hurts me so I keep lowering it. It is the
    >>softest one I could find, but it still hurts.
    >
    >You clearly NEED full suspension.

    Double suspension. Frame, fork, seatpost, and stem. With one
    of those jointed two-pad saddles. And a gel pad on each. And
    gel grips. Hell, go for broke, gel pedals for a fully
    isolated interface.

    (The troll forgot to mention shatter-resistant
    sunglasses, BTW.)

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  5. carlfogel

    carlfogel New Member

    Joined:
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    Dear Alfred,

    May I suggest a Fury Roadmaster as an
    all-round solution?

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 04:30:18 GMT, carlfogel
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >Dear Alfred,
    >
    >May I suggest a Fury Roadmaster as an all-round solution?

    I only paid $35 for mine, almost new. (It would have been a
    bargain at half the price!)

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  7. carlfogel

    carlfogel New Member

    Joined:
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    Dear Werehatrack,

    Almost new?

    An experienced cyclist and mechanic such as
    yourself may, of course, venture at your own
    peril into the used market in search of dubious
    bargains, but I must caution others to keep in
    mind the value of purchasing new equipment
    from a reputable dealer.

    The peace of mind conferred by a written warranty
    (in case of breakage, both halves are mine) and the
    knowledge of paying full sales tax ( $3.98) may be
    intangible, but both are worth considering when
    making a long-term investment.

    Besides, the girls tend to laugh at fellows who
    try to impress them on the cheap by driving used
    Ferraris. New or nothing, that's my motto!

    Opulently,

    Carl Fogel
     
  8. Alfred Ryder wrote:

    > I did find wheels with 16 spokes that enable me to go much
    > faster. I worried about so few spokes until I learned that
    > my rims are heavily anodized.

    I hope you don't have radial spokes. They give a really
    hard ride ;-)
     
  9. Smilin321

    Smilin321 Guest

    Alfred,

    I'm sitting here nursing a separated shoulder from a crash
    last week. I desperately needed something to cheer me up,
    especially knowing I could be riding right now. I just lost
    it on the bucket 'o gas in the basement line.

    Thanks, I needed that.

    Chris

    "Alfred Ryder" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<t-
    [email protected]>...
    > My old steel frame was getting floppy with age so I bought
    > a fat-tube aluminum frame. But aluminum gives such a harsh
    > ride that I bought a carbon fiber frame. Carbon gives a
    > much better ride than aluminum. And I am having trouble
    > finding 20mm tires that have a deep enough tread to give
    > me reasonable traction. I did find wheels with 16 spokes
    > that enable me to go much faster. I worried about so few
    > spokes until I learned that my rims are heavily anodized.
    > I also removed the front brake, which is too dangerous to
    > use. The other problem I have is finding a helmet that has
    > enough big vents. And no-way would I ride without a helmet
    > because the roads are really dangerous and the helmet will
    > save my life. I stay on sidewalks and paths, though, so I
    > should be OK. I maintain the bike well, taking the chain
    > off after every ride and soaking it in bucket of gasoline
    > in the basement. I also take the crank set lever arms off
    > after every ride, make sure there is no grease on the
    > tapers, and then tighten the bolts as hard as I can. My
    > saddle really hurts me so I keep lowering it. It is the
    > softest one I could find, but it still hurts.
     
  10. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    Don't forget to shop for an LBS when you get your
    Powercrancks.
     
  11. meb

    meb New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    1,219
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    0
    The demand for 20mm knobby tires is so high that you'll find that if you check with your LBS they can't keep them in stock. Your best option will be to groove your own knobby tires.
     
  12. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 19:00:13 GMT, meb <[email protected]>
    may have said:

    >Alfred Ryder wrote:
    > > My old steel frame was getting floppy with age so I
    > > bought a fat-tube aluminum frame. But aluminum gives
    > > such a harsh ride that I bought a carbon fiber frame.
    > > Carbon gives a much better ride than aluminum. And I am
    > > having trouble finding 20mm tires that have a deep
    > > enough tread to give me reasonable traction. I did find
    > > wheels with 16 spokes that enable me to go much faster.
    > > I worried about so few spokes until I learned that my
    > > rims are heavily anodized. I also removed the front
    > > brake, which is too dangerous to use. The other problem
    > > I have is finding a helmet that has enough big vents.
    > > And no-way would I ride without a helmet because the
    > > roads are really dangerous and the helmet will save my
    > > life. I stay on sidewalks and paths, though, so I
    > > should be OK. I maintain the bike well, taking the
    > > chain off after every ride and soaking it in bucket of
    > > gasoline in the basement. I also take the crank set
    > > lever arms off after every ride, make sure there is no
    > > grease on the tapers, and then tighten the bolts as
    > > hard as I can. My saddle really hurts me so I keep
    > > lowering it. It is the softest one I could find, but it
    > > still hurts.
    >
    >
    >The demand for 20mm knobby tires is so high that you'll
    >find that if you check with your LBS they can't keep them
    >in stock. Your best option will be to groove your own
    >knobby tires.

    No, the solution is to buy a pair of tire liners and MTB
    tires, cut the knobs from the from the latter, attach them
    to the 700 slick using small screws from the inside
    bolstered with glue, and then cover the screwheads with the
    tire liner and install. As an added bonus, when the knobs
    wear down, you'll have ice studs. Remember to use screws
    with a left-hand thread on the right front and left rear row
    of knobs, and don't use pop rivets for this; they're
    aluminum, and will confuse the traffic radar that is
    supposed to see you coming so that the light will turn
    green. And a pair of playing cards clothespinned to the
    stays so that they flap against the spokes will make a noise
    like a motorcycle so that people in cars will know that
    you're there and not run over you; loud cards save lives.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  13. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    carlfogel wrote:
    > > >May I suggest a Fury Roadmaster as an all-round
    > > >solution?
    > > I only paid $35 for mine, almost new. (It would have
    > > been a bargain at half the price!)

    carlfogel also wrote:
    > An experienced cyclist and mechanic such as yourself may,
    > of course, venture at your own peril into the used market
    > in search of dubious bargains, but I must caution others
    > to keep in mind the value of purchasing new equipment from
    > a reputable dealer.
    >
    > The peace of mind conferred by a written warranty (in case
    > of breakage, both halves are mine) and the knowledge of
    > paying full sales tax ( $3.98) may be intangible, but both
    > are worth considering when making a long-term investment.
    >
    > Besides, the girls tend to laugh at fellows who try to
    > impress them on the cheap by driving used Ferraris. New or
    > nothing, that's my motto!

    Bicycle pricing has never made any sense.

    Here in Madison this weekend there's a BigBox bicycle store
    selling Raleigh M50 bicycles for "only" $500 each at a
    rented sports arena. We sell them, very profitably, at $350.
    I am not giving them away, either. (Applying a Campagnolo-
    equipped bike margin they would be $269)

    I talked with a woman who was disappointed her size was sold
    out of the "$600" Raleigh model at the bargain price of $400
    there. We were standing next to that model bike with the
    same $299 price tag it's worn since last August when the new
    models came out.

    Although she was happy riding off on her new bike she never
    quite understood what was going on and I didn't see the need
    to pursue it. I might add the "sale" bikes, which cost more,
    are "ten minute assembly", that is, pedals on and out the
    door. We still frame-off build all our bikes.

    There's more. Those guys will move a few hundred of that
    model today and tomorrow whereas we are in danger of losing
    our Raleigh dealership after thirty years - you need to buy
    fifty bikes a year and we just can't manage that any more.
    When they built Sports and Superbes and Internationals we
    couldn't get enough, and ran through them direct-ship from
    Nottingham by the container ( 600 bikes per). Since
    Raleigh's added a boinger fork to the last sensible commuter
    bike, we can't do it with a straight face. And no room for
    mudguards on the commuter bikes! Fifty is very difficult
    now. We sell more Waterfords ($3500) than Raleighs ($350).

    Perhaps if we sold Fury Roadmasters for $500 in a sports
    arena with television advertising . . . ???
    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1
    April, 1971
     
  14. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:07:07 -0600, A Muzi <[email protected]> may
    have said:

    >Perhaps if we sold Fury Roadmasters for $500 in a sports
    >arena with television advertising . . . ???

    You'd need a sticker to put on the frame designating them as
    a special model, like what Chevrolet does with many of their
    cars and trucks.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  15. You forgot to mention your difficulty in finding replacement
    BioPace chainrings. ;-3)

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear
    for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  16. Hugh Fenton

    Hugh Fenton Guest

    "Alfred Ryder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My old steel frame was getting floppy with age so I bought
    > a fat-tube aluminum frame. But aluminum gives such a harsh
    > ride that I bought a
    carbon
    > fiber frame. Carbon gives a much better ride than
    > aluminum. And I am
    having
    > trouble finding 20mm tires that have a deep enough tread
    > to give me reasonable traction. I did find wheels with 16
    > spokes that enable me to go much faster. I worried about
    > so few spokes until I learned that my rims
    are
    > heavily anodized. I also removed the front brake, which is
    > too dangerous
    to
    > use. The other problem I have is finding a helmet that has
    > enough big
    vents.
    > And no-way would I ride without a helmet because the roads
    > are really dangerous and the helmet will save my life. I
    > stay on sidewalks and paths, though, so I should be OK. I
    > maintain the bike well, taking the chain off after every
    > ride and soaking it in bucket of gasoline in the basement.
    > I also take the crank set lever arms off after every ride,
    > make sure there
    is
    > no grease on the tapers, and then tighten the bolts as
    > hard as I can. My saddle really hurts me so I keep
    > lowering it. It is the softest one I
    could
    > find, but it still hurts.
    >
    >
    I hope you remembered to apply WD40 liberally to the chain
    afterwards Hugh Fenton
     
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