Pls Help Me Choose $14oo Rd Bike

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by cate hall, Apr 3, 2003.

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  1. cate hall

    cate hall New Member

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    My mind is thoroughly boggled by choice & lots of newly aquired tech info,so I would really appreciate any advice/feedback.
     
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  2. cate hall

    cate hall New Member

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    don't know what happened then it posted before I'd finished [newbie to computers as well as fancy bikes]I've used MTB for 2yrs to commute daily & have recently cranked up level of interest in in riding longer distances eg all day rides with a view to building up to abit of touring.I want abike that will to all this.So far I'm looking at-Avanti Blade comp/Shogun MetroLX/Marin Bear../Merida Speeder3.TheGiant Perigee is too heavy.
    Does anyone know anything about these.
    Thanks
     
  3. D&M Johnston

    D&M Johnston Guest

    Hi Cate

    I think you might be interested in having a look at the new Mongoose Rondenner(i think that's how
    it's spelt). It's designed speciffically with commutting and touring in mind and it's quite cheap
    for a tourer, around $1,200 . If you go to the newsagents and try to find a mag called Australian
    Cyclist, the Rondenner is displayed in the current issue towards the back half of the mag. It was
    given an ok write up as well. In fact I want to have a good look at this bike as well.

    Regards DJ "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > don't know what happened then it posted before I'd finished [newbie to computers as well as
    > fancy bikes]I've used MTB for 2yrs to commute daily & have recently cranked up level of
    > interest in in riding longer distances eg all day rides with a view to building up to abit of
    > touring.I want abike that will to all this.So far I'm looking at-Avanti Blade comp/Shogun
    > MetroLX/Marin Bear../Merida Speeder3.TheGiant Perigee is too heavy. Does anyone know anything
    > about these. Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  4. Adrian

    Adrian Guest

    "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > don't know what happened then it posted before I'd finished [newbie to computers as well as
    > fancy bikes]I've used MTB for 2yrs to commute daily & have recently cranked up level of
    > interest in in riding longer distances eg all day rides with a view to building up to abit of
    > touring.I want abike that will to all this.So far I'm looking at-Avanti Blade comp/Shogun
    > MetroLX/Marin Bear../Merida Speeder3.TheGiant Perigee is too heavy. Does anyone know anything
    > about these. Thanks
    >

    You might be very interested in the Specialized Sequoia. The Expert is about $1500, Shimano 105,
    drop bars, very comfortable as commuting / day ride bike. Suitable for light touring (front forks
    are carbon and would suggest avoiding any panniers there). But has appropriate brazeons for the
    rear, accomodates up to 28 tyre... Well I love it anyways... Might as well take a look! Comes in at
    under 10Kgs.
     
  5. "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > don't know what happened then it posted before I'd finished [newbie to computers as well as
    > fancy bikes]I've used MTB for 2yrs to commute daily & have recently cranked up level of
    > interest in in riding longer distances eg all day rides with a view to building up to abit of
    > touring.I want abike that will to all this.So far I'm looking at-Avanti Blade comp/Shogun
    > MetroLX/Marin Bear../Merida Speeder3.TheGiant Perigee is too heavy. Does anyone know anything
    > about these. Thanks
    >
    Bicycle choice is a personal thing, judging from the variety of types seen on the road. However,
    none of the bicycles on your list would be my choice for your aims of long day rides and tours. A
    touring bicycle needs:
    * reasonably long chain stays to allow a range of tyre sizes to be fitted as well as mudguards if
    desired and to provide heel clearance when panniers are fitted. For long day riding you would
    probably want 23 or 25 mm tyres, for touring with a load - 28 or 32 mm.
    * threaded eyes in front and rear drop outs and on seat stays for pannier rack mounting,
    * not too upright riding position to avoid undue jolting of the backside on poor roads,
    * a range of hand positions to delay upper body fatigue, including a low one for riding into head
    winds. For me this means drop bars,
    * a structure with a golden compromise between lowest weight and sufficient stiffness when loaded,
    * a range of gears suitable for the range of intended uses and the rider's strength.

    The list goes on but this is a start. Some of the bicycles on your list have some of the attributes,
    but none have them all. For example, the Avanti Blade Comp seems to have eyes on the drop outs but I
    wonder if the chain stays are long enough. The rider position looks far too upright to me for
    comfortable and efficient road riding. Perhaps the shock absorbing seat post is fitted in an attempt
    to overcome this problem. And why they used we ak radial lacing on the front wheel is beyond me.
    Shimano, the stated parts supplier, will not guarantee hubs laced to radial spokes.

    Have a look at touring bicycles. Although an endangered species in a polarized market (mountain
    bikes, few of which see mountains and road racing bikes, few of which are ever raced) they are
    around and to me are the most versatile of all bicycles. Fast enough to train with the racers (motor
    permitting), great for commuting (can fit mudguards, carry bags) and, of course, ideal for touring
    with their sensible positioning, their spread of useful gears and their load carrying ability. I
    would talk to someone who knows touring. My adviser is Ian Christie of Christie Cycles in Hawthorn,
    Melbourne.

    Good shopping and let the group know what you decide.

    John Retchford
     
  6. Warwick

    Warwick Guest

    I wonder how many people have been put off riding because of an inappropriate choice of bike. I own
    a racer and race and an MTB and do single track/off road. I rode my MTB with mid range tires to work
    the other day and it nearly killed me and was really not a very enjoyable experience - so much
    effort compared to a racer.

    I know the advantages of MTBs (eg punctures less likely, more comfy, easier gearing etc.), but if
    some people knew just how much faster (and in my opinion easier) you can ride a certain distance on
    a racer then maybe we would have more cyclists out there.

    "John Retchford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > don't know what happened then it posted before I'd finished [newbie to computers as well as
    > > fancy bikes]I've used MTB for 2yrs to commute daily & have recently cranked up level of interest
    > > in in riding longer distances eg all day rides with a view to building up to abit of touring.I
    > > want abike that will to all this.So far I'm looking at-Avanti Blade comp/Shogun MetroLX/Marin
    > > Bear../Merida Speeder3.TheGiant Perigee is too heavy. Does anyone know anything about these.
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > Bicycle choice is a personal thing, judging from the variety of types seen on the road. However,
    > none of the bicycles on your list would be my
    choice
    > for your aims of long day rides and tours. A touring bicycle needs:
    > * reasonably long chain stays to allow a range of tyre sizes to be fitted
    as
    > well as mudguards if desired and to provide heel clearance when panniers
    are
    > fitted. For long day riding you would probably want 23 or 25 mm tyres,
    for
    > touring with a load - 28 or 32 mm.
    > * threaded eyes in front and rear drop outs and on seat stays for pannier rack mounting,
    > * not too upright riding position to avoid undue jolting of the backside
    on
    > poor roads,
    > * a range of hand positions to delay upper body fatigue, including a low
    one
    > for riding into head winds. For me this means drop bars,
    > * a structure with a golden compromise between lowest weight and
    sufficient
    > stiffness when loaded,
    > * a range of gears suitable for the range of intended uses and the rider's strength.
    >
    > The list goes on but this is a start. Some of the bicycles on your list have some of the
    > attributes, but none have them all. For example, the Avanti Blade Comp seems to have eyes on the
    > drop outs but I wonder if the chain stays are long enough. The rider position looks far too
    > upright to
    me
    > for comfortable and efficient road riding. Perhaps the shock absorbing
    seat
    > post is fitted in an attempt to overcome this problem. And why they used
    we
    > ak radial lacing on the front wheel is beyond me. Shimano, the stated
    parts
    > supplier, will not guarantee hubs laced to radial spokes.
    >
    > Have a look at touring bicycles. Although an endangered species in a polarized market (mountain
    > bikes, few of which see mountains and road
    racing
    > bikes, few of which are ever raced) they are around and to me are the most versatile of all
    > bicycles. Fast enough to train with the racers (motor permitting), great for commuting (can fit
    > mudguards, carry bags) and, of course, ideal for touring with their sensible positioning, their
    > spread of useful gears and their load carrying ability. I would talk to someone who knows touring.
    > My adviser is Ian Christie of Christie Cycles in Hawthorn, Melbourne.
    >
    > Good shopping and let the group know what you decide.
    >
    > John Retchford
     
  7. Jose Rizal

    Jose Rizal Guest

    John Retchford:

    > Bicycle choice is a personal thing, judging from the variety of types seen on the road. However,
    > none of the bicycles on your list would be my choice for your aims of long day rides and tours. A
    > touring bicycle needs:
    > * reasonably long chain stays to allow a range of tyre sizes to be fitted as well as mudguards if
    > desired and to provide heel clearance when panniers are fitted. For long day riding you would
    > probably want 23 or 25 mm tyres, for touring with a load - 28 or 32 mm.
    > * threaded eyes in front and rear drop outs and on seat stays for pannier rack mounting,
    > * not too upright riding position to avoid undue jolting of the backside on poor roads,
    > * a range of hand positions to delay upper body fatigue, including a low one for riding into head
    > winds. For me this means drop bars,
    > * a structure with a golden compromise between lowest weight and sufficient stiffness when loaded,
    > * a range of gears suitable for the range of intended uses and the rider's strength.

    For touring, what length chainstays do you suggest, and what are your thoughts on using 26" versus
    700c tyres?
     
  8. "Jose Rizal" <[email protected]_._> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > For touring, what length chainstays do you suggest, and what are your thoughts on using 26" versus
    > 700c tyres?

    Can't remember the length of mine exactly, but they are about 435 mm. Determining a sensible length
    during frame design is a fairly simple procedure. Femur length, crank length and where you want the
    knee to lie relative to the pedal axle determine the seat tube angle. You then position the bottom
    bracket axis. With 700C wheels, a reasonable BB drop (distance below the wheel axles) is 240 mm
    minus the crank length. This should give adequate pedal clearance for cornering vigorously. You then
    draw in the path of your heel as the cranks rotate and check that there is sensible clearance when
    the proposed rack, pannier and chain stay length is used. Check also that the gap between the tyre
    and the rear of the seat tube will easily accommodate the largest tyre you are likely to use as well
    as a mudguard. Chainstays longer than fashionable have no disadvantages (other than a miniscule
    weight increase) and can help gear changing slightly by reducing the chain angle.

    I use 700C wheels for touring. I use 23 mm tyres when riding unladen on reasonable roads and wider
    tyres when carrying camping gear. The choice of suitable tyres seems greater in this size than in
    26". The latter seems more geared towards the cross country market, although devotees tell me they
    can find what they want in this size. Larger diameters give lower rolling resistance, but the
    difference would be miniscule in this case for comparable tyres.

    John Retchford
     
  9. Andyb

    Andyb Guest

    Jose,

    "Jose Rizal" <[email protected]_._> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > For touring, what length chainstays do you suggest, and what are your thoughts on using 26" versus
    > 700c tyres?

    My tourer has 44.5cm chainstays and that is usually enough unless I mount the pannier a long way
    forward on the rack. I have also put a rack on a Lemond Alpe d'Huez with 41.8cm chainstays. Not much
    heel clearance and mounting the rack was a nightmare despite having all the necessary dropouts on
    the frame. It will depend on the shape of your panniers too. If you're serious about using panniers,
    I'd be looking for 44cm or more.

    I like the choices available in 700c tyres. 26" tyres in narrow sizes are hard to find, although
    it's easier to find 36 spoke rims in 26" if you're looking for something strong. I run 700X28c tyres
    on a fairly standard road rim (Mavic CXP). I have also used the 700x32c continental top touring
    tyres on a Rigida box-section rim (slightly wider). With these sized-tyres and by maintaining good
    tyre pressure, I haven't had a puncture in 2 years of commuting (about 8000km). Both are 32-spoke
    rims and I've had minimal wheel maintenance (none on the Rigida rims despite taking quite a
    hammering, the Mavics are fairly new).

    Ciao,

    AndyB
     
  10. A - J - S

    A - J - S Guest

    Are you specifically going to ride road only ? (Then the little light comes on as he reads the
    post title :)

    Have you considered a second hand bike ? You should be able to get a much better bike for the
    same money.

    Personally this is what I would do. I would also have a good look for old stock/run outs.

    If you can ride some bikes in a higher price bracket just to give you a feel of the difference
    between bikes and types. The difference between a lowish price and medium price bike can be amazing
    and may convince you to shop around for a good second.

    Most of my riding is done on a Xc race bike and the difference between this and a cheaper bike would
    amaze you. The distances I can ride on this in comparison to some of the bikes my friend ride is
    astounding (They mostly just think I am fitter than them :).

    AJS

    "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > don't know what happened then it posted before I'd finished [newbie to computers as well as
    > fancy bikes]I've used MTB for 2yrs to commute daily & have recently cranked up level of
    > interest in in riding longer distances eg all day rides with a view to building up to abit of
    > touring.I want abike that will to all this.So far I'm looking at-Avanti Blade comp/Shogun
    > MetroLX/Marin Bear../Merida Speeder3.TheGiant Perigee is too heavy. Does anyone know anything
    > about these. Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  11. cate hall

    cate hall New Member

    Joined:
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    Thanks everyone for your advice I'm quite chuffed.You've convinced me to go for drop bars-before the MTB I always had old style 'racers' & I really miss that feeling of speed.I'll check out the Specialized Sequoia'sounds like it may almost have the Golden Comprimise John R. mentioned.THanks John for all the pointers,I'll contact Christies.

    Exciu.se me if I use the terminology incorectly but do you think I should make sure the crankset goes down to 26 or 28 as I still need to go to the easiet gear on some hills.

    I guess I'm after more than one bike can give but you never know. I may find one that's as light & fast as poss. for bikepaths& commuting but still strong enough for the touring I don't actually

    do yet. Cheers,Cate
     
  12. Who is likely to sell this bike?

    I've looked on the Fitzroy Cycles website, also Freedom Machine, but they only appear to sell the
    Allez... The Sequoia looks like a bike better suited to my size, and requirements, and budget than
    the Allez....

    "Adrian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > don't know what happened then it posted before I'd finished [newbie to computers as well as
    > > fancy bikes]I've used MTB for 2yrs to commute daily & have recently cranked up level of interest
    > > in in riding longer distances eg all day rides with a view to building up to abit of touring.I
    > > want abike that will to all this.So far I'm looking at-Avanti Blade comp/Shogun MetroLX/Marin
    > > Bear../Merida Speeder3.TheGiant Perigee is too heavy. Does anyone know anything about these.
    > > Thanks
    > >
    >
    > You might be very interested in the Specialized Sequoia. The Expert is
    about
    > $1500, Shimano 105, drop bars, very comfortable as commuting / day ride bike. Suitable for light
    > touring (front forks are carbon and would suggest avoiding any panniers there). But has
    > appropriate brazeons for the rear, accomodates up to 28 tyre... Well I love it anyways... Might as
    > well take
    a
    > look! Comes in at under 10Kgs.
     
  13. Fahren

    Fahren New Member

    Joined:
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  14. Adrian

    Adrian Guest

    "Andrew Morris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Who is likely to sell this bike?
    >
    > I've looked on the Fitzroy Cycles website, also Freedom Machine, but they only appear to sell the
    > Allez... The Sequoia looks like a bike better
    suited
    > to my size, and requirements, and budget than the Allez....
    >

    I'm not sure who would stock that where you are... Try ringing a few stores in your area. With the
    number of bikes on display at most places if you don't ask you probably won't find it! The bike has
    been out now for a few weeks only but should be about in a few stores. Here in Adelaide a local
    store has all three models on the floor.
     
  15. Andyb

    Andyb Guest

    "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Exciu.se me if I use the terminology incorectly but do you think I should make sure the crankset
    > goes down to 26 or 28 as I still need to go to the easiet gear on some hills.

    Crankset usually refers to the pedal cranks. The front sprockets are typcially referred to as
    "chainrings". The rear sprockets as a "cluster".

    Even if you are going with a road bike, you can get them with triple chainrings (three sprockets at
    the front) like a mountain bike or hybrid. If you're worried about hills, it's a very worthwhile
    option. Touring bikes like the Mongoose Randonneur someone mentioned come with them by default. If
    you find a bike you like that doesn't have three chainrings, it will typically be only a minor
    upgrade to add them (say $50), and sometimes even free if they can order from the distributor with
    the triple chainrings fitted. The most common road triple is a Shimano 30-42-52. If the largest
    sprocket in your cluster (the rear) has 26 or 28 teeth, this should be enough for the biggest hills
    unless you're carrying a significant load.

    I have a triple chainring on both of my (road) bikes. I like it because I use the bikes for
    commuting, including to and from swimming, training sessions etc. If you have no juice left in your
    tank, being able to drop onto the granny gear (the smallest front chainring) for climbing hills is a
    huge blessing.

    Ciao,

    AndyB
     
  16. The Goose

    The Goose Guest

    "Jose Rizal" <[email protected]_._> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > John Retchford: For touring, what length chainstays do you suggest, and what are your thoughts on
    > using 26" versus 700c tyres?

    Not particularly relating to touring but my only beef about my hybrid is the lack of choice of 700c
    tyres in the 28 to 38mm range. Perhaps the tyres are available but when I last went round the bike
    shops in Wollongong no shop stocked more than one 700c tyre in that width range. from memory every
    shop had IRC 700*38 slick and that was it. For 26" rims they had racks and racks of different tyres
    from aggresive knobblies to slicks with a wide range of widths.

    --
    Regards Bruce

    http://www.ozemail.com.au/~bcl
     
  17. cate hall

    cate hall New Member

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    I downlaoded info on the Sequoia and it looks interesting
    unfortunately Gold Cross have already sold out so I'll ring around.
    At this stage the Avanti Blade Comp is looking most likely Although I still haven't checked out any touring bikes.
    I have {poss. wrongly] an idea they're quite heavy.


    cheers' Cate
     
  18. When I spoke with GoldCross, they hadn't even heard of the bike....

    "cate hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I downlaoded info on the Sequoia and it looks interesting unfortunately Gold Cross have already
    > sold out so I'll ring around. At this stage the Avanti Blade Comp is looking most likely Although
    > I still haven't checked out any touring bikes. I have {poss. wrongly] an idea they're quite heavy.
    >
    >
    > cheers' CateOriginally posted by Fahren Originally posted by Andrew Morris Who is likely to sell
    > this bike?
    >
    > I've looked on the Fitzroy Cycles website, also Freedom Machine, but they only appear to sell the
    > Allez... The Sequoia looks like a bike better suited to my size, and requirements, and budget than
    > the Allez....
    >
    > www.goldcross.com.au has Specialized listed and links to Specialized.com which has specs & .PDF
    > brochure on the sequoia range. They probably can order it (don't quote me, I don't know) but they
    > have been pretty helpful in the past. [ /QUOTE]
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  19. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    --------------050001040604020106080503 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    I have been riding an English tourer with 26 inch wheels for nearly a year. I have not found any
    disadvantages and you get a much stronger wheel. I have not bought tyres yet but agree there is a
    far wider range available in the average shop

    Jack

    The Goose wrote:

    >"Jose Rizal" <[email protected]_._> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>John Retchford: For touring, what length chainstays do you suggest, and what are your thoughts on
    >>using 26" versus 700c tyres?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Not particularly relating to touring but my only beef about my hybrid is the lack of choice of 700c
    >tyres in the 28 to 38mm range. Perhaps the tyres are available but when I last went round the bike
    >shops in Wollongong no shop stocked more than one 700c tyre in that width range. from memory every
    >shop had IRC 700*38 slick and that was it. For 26" rims they had racks and racks of different tyres
    >from aggresive knobblies to slicks with a wide range of widths.
    >
    >--
    >Regards Bruce
    >
    >http://www.ozemail.com.au/~bcl
    >
    >
    >
    >

    --------------050001040604020106080503 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <title></title>
    </head> <body> I have been riding an English tourer with 26 inch wheels for nearly a year. I have
    not found any disadvantages and you get a much stronger wheel. I have not bought tyres yet but agree
    there is a far wider range available in the average shop<br> <br> Jack<br> <br> <br> The Goose
    wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite" cite="[email protected]"> <pre
    wrap="">"Jose Rizal" <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:[email protected]_._"><[email protected]_._></a> wrote in
    message <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="news:[email protected]
    ink.net">news:O_7ja.[email protected]</a>... </pre> <blockquote
    type="cite"> <pre wrap="">John Retchford: For touring, what length chainstays do you suggest, and
    what are your thoughts on using 26" versus 700c tyres? </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> Not
    particularly relating to touring but my only beef about my hybrid is the lack of choice of 700c
    tyres in the 28 to 38mm range. Perhaps the tyres are available but when I last went round the bike
    shops in Wollongong no shop stocked more than one 700c tyre in that width range. from memory every
    shop had IRC 700*38 slick and that was it. For 26" rims they had racks and racks of different tyres
    from aggresive knobblies to slicks with a wide range of widths.

    --
    Regards Bruce

    <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
    href="http://www.ozemail.com.au/~bcl">http://www.ozemail.com.au/~bcl</a>

    </pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>

    --------------050001040604020106080503--
     
  20. cate hall

    cate hall New Member

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    Adrian are you quoting American $ bc Goldcross just emailed me to say they can order the Specialized Sequioa but it is Au$2599
    not $1500 as you said.It was looking sooo good.

    Yesterday I looked at aSpecialized Sirrus Elite which is more in my price range also aMarin Millvalley $1499.

    Cheers, Cate
     
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