Polar 710 cadence and speedo sender

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by News.Sf.Sbcglob, Mar 22, 2003.

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  1. How do you dial up the broadcast range on a Polar 710 so that you can set the watch farther away
    from the sender?
     
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  2. Sparks

    Sparks Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "news.sf.sbcglobal.net" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How do you dial up the broadcast range on a Polar 710 so that you can set the watch farther away
    > from the sender?
    >

    remove the two screws holding it together

    move the jumper from the 2 inner pins to the 2 outer pins (there are 3 pins total)

    put it back together...I have my speed sensor on the back wheel and it has worked perfectly

    ________________________________

    Remove S.P.A.M in email adddress Climb <at> mac <dot> com
    ________________________________
     
  3. Daveh

    Daveh Guest

    Sparks <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "news.sf.sbcglobal.net" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > How do you dial up the broadcast range on a Polar 710 so that you can set the watch farther away
    > > from the sender?
    > >
    >
    > remove the two screws holding it together
    >
    > move the jumper from the 2 inner pins to the 2 outer pins (there are 3 pins total)
    >
    > put it back together...I have my speed sensor on the back wheel and it has worked perfectly
    >
    >
    > ________________________________
    >
    > Remove S.P.A.M in email adddress Climb <at> mac <dot> com
    > ________________________________

    I gather that is the sensor - not the watch!!

    Can you do this with the cadence sensor, too? It only works when mounted on the tri bars - not on
    the wrist.

    Thanks.
     
  4. Sparks

    Sparks Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (DaveH) wrote:

    > I gather that is the sensor - not the watch!!
    >
    > Can you do this with the cadence sensor, too? It only works when mounted on the tri bars - not on
    > the wrist.

    yup...the sensor. works on cadence too.

    ________________________________

    Remove S.P.A.M in email adddress Climb <at> mac <dot> com
    ________________________________
     
  5. FWIW, the watch picks up signals better when it is oriented parallel to the bike (as when handlebar
    mounted), and worse when it is perpendicular to the bike (as when on your wrist when your arms are
    on your aerobars).

    Kirby.

    "DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sparks <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "news.sf.sbcglobal.net" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > How do you dial up the broadcast range on a Polar 710 so that you can set the watch farther
    > > > away from the sender?
    > > >
    > >
    > > remove the two screws holding it together
    > >
    > > move the jumper from the 2 inner pins to the 2 outer pins (there are 3 pins total)
    > >
    > > put it back together...I have my speed sensor on the back wheel and it has worked perfectly
    > >
    > >
    > > ________________________________
    > >
    > > Remove S.P.A.M in email adddress Climb <at> mac <dot> com
    > > ________________________________
    >
    > I gather that is the sensor - not the watch!!
    >
    > Can you do this with the cadence sensor, too? It only works when mounted on the tri bars - not on
    > the wrist.
    >
    > Thanks.
     
  6. DaveH wrote:
    > Sparks <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> "news.sf.sbcglobal.net" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> How do you dial up the broadcast range on a Polar 710 so that you can set the watch farther away
    >>> from the sender?
    >>>
    >>
    >> remove the two screws holding it together
    >>
    >> move the jumper from the 2 inner pins to the 2 outer pins (there are 3 pins total)
    >>
    >> put it back together...I have my speed sensor on the back wheel and it has worked perfectly
    >>
    >>
    >> ________________________________
    >>
    >> Remove S.P.A.M in email adddress Climb <at> mac <dot> com
    >> ________________________________
    >
    > I gather that is the sensor - not the watch!!
    >
    > Can you do this with the cadence sensor, too? It only works when mounted on the tri bars - not on
    > the wrist.
    >
    > Thanks.

    There are three settings for both the cadence and speed sensor. Low, medium and high. The speed
    sensor is at low default and the cadence sensor is set to medium default. Set the jumper over the
    two inner pins for medium and the two outer pins for high. For low you can just remove it or hang it
    onto the innermost pin where it doesn't do anything.

    The setback is of course shorter battery life.
    --
    Perre

    Remove the DOTs to reply
     
  7. Kirby Krieger wrote:

    > FWIW, the watch picks up signals better when it is oriented parallel to the bike (as when
    > handlebar mounted), and worse when it is perpendicular to the bike (as when on your wrist when
    > your arms are on your aerobars).

    Unfortunantly, you don't always have a choice as to the mounting orientation of the
    relavant sensor.

    I had serious problems with my wheel speed/distance sensor simply not having a high enough output
    for reliable operation.

    What I did was work around the problem by using a passive retransmission antenna.

    Using thin wire, and about 10 turns around the sensor, and another 10 turns on the handlebar
    mount, both coils joined by a twisted pair of the same thin wire leading from the handlebar mount
    to the front fork around the sensor. I duplicated that for the cadence sensor as well.

    I could turn the power output of both sensors right down to conserve battery power, and still
    maintain reliable operation.

    The wheel sensor that was the least reliable, is now the most reliable.

    --
    Linux Registered User # 302622 <http://counter.li.org
     
  8. Sparks

    Sparks Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    John Tserkezis <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What I did was work around the problem by using a passive retransmission antenna.

    good idea...a Yagi is a bit too big.

    ________________________________

    Remove S.P.A.M in email adddress Climb <at> mac <dot> com
    ________________________________
     
  9. John Tserkezis wrote:
    > Kirby Krieger wrote:
    >
    >> FWIW, the watch picks up signals better when it is oriented parallel to the bike (as when
    >> handlebar mounted), and worse when it is perpendicular to the bike (as when on your wrist when
    >> your arms are on your aerobars).
    >
    > Unfortunantly, you don't always have a choice as to the mounting orientation of the relavant
    > sensor.
    >
    > I had serious problems with my wheel speed/distance sensor simply not having a high enough
    > output for reliable operation.
    >
    > What I did was work around the problem by using a passive retransmission antenna.
    >
    > Using thin wire, and about 10 turns around the sensor, and another 10 turns on the handlebar
    > mount, both coils joined by a twisted pair of the same thin wire leading from the handlebar
    > mount to the front fork around the sensor. I duplicated that for the cadence sensor as well.
    >
    > I could turn the power output of both sensors right down to
    > conserve battery power, and still maintain reliable operation.
    >
    > The wheel sensor that was the least reliable, is now the most reliable.

    Very interesting. I've had problems mounting my speed sensor on the rear wheel. Is there anyplace I
    can read more on these passive retransmission antennas.

    --
    Perre

    Remove the DOTs to reply
     
  10. Sparks wrote:

    >> What I did was work around the problem by using a passive retransmission antenna.

    > good idea...a Yagi is a bit too big.

    For 4.5KHz? Heck yeah!

    --
    Linux Registered User # 302622 <http://counter.li.org
     
  11. Per Elms=E4ter wrote:

    > Very interesting. I've had problems mounting my speed sensor on the rea=
    r
    > wheel. Is there anyplace I can read more on these passive retransmissio=
    n
    > antennas.

    Not sure, I haven't even looked myself.

    The theory of operation is:

    Any antenna, in theory, will transmit as well as it can receive. I've = seen=20 this being used
    for houses down in valleys where they can't point their T= V=20 antenna correctly because, well,
    there's a moutain in the way. Right at the top of the mountain, you have two TV antennas
    connected=20 back-to-back (the cables joined together) with one pointing directly at t= he=20
    transmitter, the other pointing directly (down) at the house.

    This relies on several things, the transmitter is in _resonably_ close =

    proximity, the house isn't too far away, and the cable inbetween isn't lo= ng.

    My variation was optimised for the polars for the type of 'antennas' th= ey use=20 (inductors,
    which are just coils themselves). An antenna coil around the=
    =20
    inductor, (or more managable, around the whole polar sensor), forms one e= nd,=20 the other is just
    a coil that sits flat against the handlebar mount. The handlebar end is not optimised for the
    watch, as I would have to mo= unt=20 the coil vertically around the watch, fouling against the
    wristbands, and=
    =20
    obscuring the display. The next best _practical_ method worked well enou= gh.

    A google search shows that I said the same thing (in this very group) w= hen I=20 first did it, in
    late 2001. It's still working.

    --=20 Linux Registered User # 302622 <http://counter.li=
    =2Eorg
     
  12. John Tserkezis wrote:
    > A google search shows that I said the same thing (in this very
    > group) when I first did it, in late 2001. It's still working.

    Thanks John. I beleieve you have given me hope of solving some of those problems I have today.

    --
    Perre

    Remove the DOTs to reply
     
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