Police learn lessons...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Colin Blackburn, Mar 15, 2004.

  1. This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs defend
    bike courses", explains that officers from several forces
    are going on bike courses to learn cycling techniques for
    their job as cycling officers.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm

    What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    criticised the police for this but no mention is made of any
    criticism.

    Colin
    --
     
    Tags:


  2. On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 14:48:33 -0000,
    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:
    > This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    > defend bike courses", explains that officers from several
    > forces are going on bike courses to learn cycling
    > techniques for their job as cycling officers.
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm
    >
    > What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    > the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    > criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    > any criticism.

    Presumably people might complain about the cost aspects.

    I do like the sound of the "extreme cycling techniques"
    whatever they may be.

    --
    Andy Leighton => [email protected] "The Lord is my
    shepherd, but we still lost the sheep dog trials"
    - Robert Rankin, _They Came And Ate Us_
     
  3. <Colin Blackburn> wrote:
    > This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    > defend bike courses", explains that officers from several
    > forces are going on bike courses to learn cycling
    > techniques for their job as cycling officers.
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm
    >
    > What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    > the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    > criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    > any criticism.

    The article in the Daily Mail [1] had quotes criticising it
    on grounds of cost.

    [1] I buy it for the mindless right-wing demagoguery.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/ Oh. Dog and a
    beer.
     
  4. On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 15:45:02 +0000, Keith Willoughby <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > <Colin Blackburn> wrote:
    >> This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    >> defend bike courses", explains that officers from several
    >> forces are going on bike courses to learn cycling
    >> techniques for their job as cycling officers.
    >>
    >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm
    >>
    >> What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    >> the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    >> criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    >> any criticism.
    >
    > The article in the Daily Mail [1] had quotes criticising
    > it on grounds of cost.

    I guessed it had been criticised somewhere and probably for
    cost reasons just curious as to why the BBC ran with the
    defence tone without citing the criticism.

    Soon they (whoever they are) will be expecting the police
    to not be trained at all in anything. I take it the
    criticism was implying that all they are being tought is
    "how to ride a bike"?

    > [1] I buy it for the mindless right-wing demagoguery.

    It's what it does best.

    Colin
    --
     
  5. Ian G Batten

    Ian G Batten Guest

  6. <Colin Blackburn> wrote: [Daily Mail on police bike
    training]
    > Soon they (whoever they are) will be expecting the police
    > to not be trained at all in anything. I take it the
    > criticism was implying that all they are being tought is
    > "how to ride a bike"?

    IIRC, the tone was "In the olden days, people knew how to
    ride a bike. They didn't need expensive touchy-feely so-
    called training, especially from filthy foreigners. It's a
    sad indictment of society that we blame on illegal
    immigrants". I could be mixing up a couple of stories
    there, though.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/ Surveillance
    makes me free
     
  7. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Keith Willoughby wrote:

    > IIRC, the tone was "In the olden days, people knew how to
    > ride a bike. They didn't need expensive touchy-feely so-
    > called training, especially from filthy foreigners. It's a
    > sad indictment of society that we blame on illegal
    > immigrants". I could be mixing up a couple of stories
    > there, though.

    "Illegal immigrants"? That's very un-PC, they're called
    "Failed asylum seekers" now, AFAICT.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
    33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
    Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  8. Ian G Batten

    Ian G Batten Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Keith Willoughby wrote:
    >
    > > IIRC, the tone was "In the olden days, people knew how
    > > to ride a bike. They didn't need expensive touchy-feely
    > > so-called training, especially from filthy foreigners.
    > > It's a sad indictment of society that we blame on
    > > illegal immigrants". I could be mixing up a couple of
    > > stories there, though.
    >
    > "Illegal immigrants"? That's very un-PC, they're called
    > "Failed asylum seekers" now, AFAICT.

    There's a superb spoof on the back page of The New Yorker
    last week. It has a set of questions from the producers to
    Mel Gibson, about his new production. Suggesting titles like
    Lethal Passion, for example. But also pointing out typos:
    ``There appears to be a space missing between Jew and Boy on
    page 48.''

    ian
     
  9. On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 14:48:33 -0000, Colin Blackburn wrote:

    > This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    > defend bike courses", explains that officers from several
    > forces are going on bike courses to learn cycling
    > techniques for their job as cycling officers.
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm
    >
    > What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    > the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    > criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    > any criticism.
    >
    > Colin
    > --

    I saw some officers riding Smith & Wesson Tactical mountain
    bikes the other week. They probably throw them at the
    criminals instead of shooting them. ;-)
    --
    Michael MacClancy Random putdown - "I've had a perfectly
    wonderful evening. But this wasn't
    it." -Groucho Marx www.macclancy.demon.co.uk
    www.macclancy.co.uk
     
  10. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Andy Leighton <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > I do like the sound of the "extreme cycling techniques"
    > whatever they may be.

    I would guess they would include things like arrest
    techniques while cycling.

    --
    Dave...
     
  11. \ Dave

    \ Dave Guest

    "Michael MacClancy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 14:48:33 -0000, Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >
    > > This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    > > defend bike
    courses",
    > > explains that officers from several forces are going on
    > > bike courses to learn cycling techniques for their job
    > > as cycling officers.
    > >
    > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/35127-
    > > 72.stm
    > >
    > > What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline
    > > and the tone of
    the
    > > piece which seems to suggest someone has criticised the
    > > police for this but no mention is made of any criticism.
    > >
    > > Colin
    > > --
    >
    > I saw some officers riding Smith & Wesson Tactical
    > mountain bikes the
    other
    > week. They probably throw them at the criminals instead of
    > shooting them. ;-)
    > --
    > Michael MacClancy

    ...and I guess when the going gets 'real tough', they'll
    invest in the Hummer MTB ;-) (no, I'm not kidding. They're
    600quid, invisible to radar, robust enough for 'behind enemy
    lines', totally silent and don't produce heat, so can't be
    picked up by IR detectors - don't know about the trooper
    pedalling hell for leather carrying 250lbs of kit on his
    back though ;-)...also, they're foldable in 30secs, so ideal
    for the multi-transport mode commute.)

    Dave.
     
  12. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 16:00:05 +0000 someone who may be Keith
    Willoughby <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >I could be mixing up a couple of stories there, though.

    I think it only has one story, which is varied to suit the
    article concerned.

    The story is essentially that everything is going wrong and
    what is needed is a nice dose of stringent measures to
    restore the good old days.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number
    F566DA0E I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK
    government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  13. Sky Fly

    Sky Fly Guest

    "Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    > defend bike courses", explains that officers from several
    > forces are going on bike courses to learn cycling
    > techniques for their job as cycling officers.
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm
    >
    > What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    > the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    > criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    > any criticism.

    Well I don't know... is it really as effective as it is
    claimed - will it help the police do a better job? I guess
    it's true that it will make them more approachable than if
    they were riding in a car, but I'm still somewhat
    doubtful. It would be interesting to have a policeman's
    perspective on this.

    --
    Akin

    aknak at aksoto dot idps dot co dot uk
     
  14. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 14:48:33 -0000, "Colin Blackburn"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    >the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    >criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    >any criticism.

    Obviously. As we all know, all they need to do is wear their
    Magic Hats and they will become invulnerable.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
    posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
    Washington University
     
  15. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Sky Fly wrote:
    > "Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >> This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    >> defend bike courses", explains that officers from several
    >> forces are going on bike courses to learn cycling
    >> techniques for their job as cycling officers.
    >>
    >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm
    >>
    >> What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    >> the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    >> criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    >> any criticism.
    >
    > Well I don't know... is it really as effective as it is
    > claimed - will it help the police do a better job?

    I'd have thought it'd be very handy for the average
    beat bobby. They can get about a lot quicker if
    something happens, but they're still easy for the
    public to get hold of.
     
  16. Eatmorepies

    Eatmorepies Guest

    > Presumably people might complain about the cost aspects.
    >
    > I do like the sound of the "extreme cycling techniques"
    > whatever they may be.

    I know this one. It's hanging on and screaming whilst going
    down big hills on my Marin.

    John
     
  17. Bens

    Bens Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:07:19 -0000, "Sky Fly" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >> This article from the BBC, headlined, "Police chiefs
    >> defend bike courses", explains that officers from several
    >> forces are going on bike courses to learn cycling
    >> techniques for their job as cycling officers.
    >>
    >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm
    >>
    >> What puzzled me was the word 'defend' in the headline and
    >> the tone of the piece which seems to suggest someone has
    >> criticised the police for this but no mention is made of
    >> any criticism.
    >
    >Well I don't know... is it really as effective as it is
    >claimed - will it help the police do a better job? I guess
    >it's true that it will make them more approachable than if
    >they were riding in a car, but I'm still somewhat doubtful.

    Probably work quite well in heavily pedestrianised areas
    such as Birmingham town center. Can't chase someone in a car
    round there.
    --
    "We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to
    prevent life escaping from us." http://www.bensales.com
     
  18. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 14:48:33 -0000, "Colin Blackburn"
    <[email protected]> wrote (more or less):

    >http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/merseyside/3512772.stm

    I've sent a complaint to their web-site, via their
    feedback link.:
    ======
    "Your article "Police chiefs defend bike courses" doesn't
    actually say who you feel the police have to defend
    themselves from.

    Perhaps you feel that everyone should just naturally attack
    the police any time they train themselves to use the
    equipment they are issued with?

    I look forward to your next article "BBC journalism chiefs
    defend word-processor training courses".

    Cheers, Euan Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122 Smalltalk
    links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk)
    http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  19. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    [email protected] (Dave Kahn) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I would guess they would include things like arrest
    > techniques while cycling.
    >

    Method 1 -

    Step 1: Approach the suspect at high speed and start to
    freewheel. Step 2: Whilst balancing carefully, climb up
    until you are standing on the saddle. Step 3: On nearing the
    suspect, launch yourself in a high altitude rugby style
    tackle, whilst announcing "You're nicked sunshine!"

    Method 2 - Step 1: Run the suspect over from behind and
    whilst he is incapacitated announce "You're nicked
    sunshine!"

    Any others?

    :)

    Graeme
     
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