Police Testimony Fails Against Peloton 1882



IMPORTANT ROAD RIDING CASE

Mr. Percy Letchford, of the Finchley Tricycle Club, was summoned at
the Brentford Petty Sessions, on Saturday last, for "furious riding"
in the Kew Bridge Road, Brentford.

P.C. 219 T stated that on the evening of the 14th he saw defendant and
several other riders on bicycles and tricycles, riding at twelve miles
an hour [1]. They passed him, and he called to them to stop; they did
not do so, and he then ran after them, and caught hold of defendant's
wheel, who, on being stopped, refused his name and address, preferring
to go to the police station.

When there he (the constable) charged him with furious driving.

In cross-examination by Mr. Horace Avory, who appeared for the
defendant, the constable admitted that defendant was not upset by
being stopped; that the distance he ran was 20 yards; that defendant
was 10 yards from the kerb (there being no kerb), and that the road
was 30 yards wide (it being as a fact only 40 feet wide); that he
would swear that there were more than five riders (as a matter of fact
there were M'Cullum and Letchford on tri's, and Weeks, Oliver Thorn,
and Temple Nicholson on bi's) [2].

Sergeant Walsh and Inspector Blake gave formal evidence as to what
transpired at the police station, which is devoid of interest to
cyclists.

Mr. Horace Avory first disclaimed any wish to dispute that a tricycle
was a "carriage" within the meaning of the Act, although he thought
that even that was open to argument [3], and he then went on to state
that having no technical knowledge of cycling himself he would leave
the case to his witnesses, but previously he called attention to the
absurdity of the constable's evidence, who stated that he met the
riders, called on them to stop, waited to see if they did so, and then
went after them and caught them all in 20 yards-—a practical
impossibility if they were riding furiously.

He then called, Mr. W. A. Smith, who appeared by subpoena, and stated
that he had never seen Mr. Letchford until within two hours of the
occurrence, but was riding back in his company.

He said they were travelling about seven miles an hour; that no one
except an expert could judge of the speed at which a machine
travelled; that the machine in question was "geared down," so that in
order to cover the same distance with ten revolutions of the wheel, as
the machine which he (witness) was riding, the defendant would have to
make 14 revolutions of his feet [4], which would naturally lead to a
supposition that the defendant was spurting to catch the witness up.

The Chairman then said that after the very lucid manner in which the
witness had given his evidence, it was needless to call additional
witnesses. It was clear that the constable had made a mistake, and the
Bench would dismiss the summons.

Mr. Horace Avory then stated that he had appeared on behalf of the
Bicycle Union, but it must not be supposed for one moment that that
body countenanced furious riding, but they thought that as this was
clearly a mistaken charge they ought to defend it.

--London Bicycle Club Gazette, 1882, p.67-8

http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA68,M1

[1] Actually, P.C. 219 T's claim that the riders blew past him at 12
mph was not utterly plausible. A year earlier, the London Bicycle Club
Gazette had covered the 1882 record of twenty miles in a hour:

http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA181,M1

[2] Er, as a matter of fact, P.C. 219 T was correct when he claimed
that there were more than five riders. Five riders are listed by name,
but a sixth rider will mysteriously appear later, W.A. Smith.

[3] A common defense in early traffic cases was to claim that the
well-established carriage laws did not apply to tricycles and bicycles
because they were not carriages, a loophole eagerly exploited on both
sides of the Atlantic.

[4] The low gearing mentioned by the wily lawyer was for defendant
Letchford's tricycle. Such lumbering beasts were usually geared down
to deal with awkward seating and their weight, which was around 75
pounds.

A popular Coventry Rotary tricycle from that era:

http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...30.50.1.45&Lang=1&imageID=165871&format=large

A Salvo-style quadricycle (there's a fourth tiny trailing wheel) from
that era:

http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...r=II-78698&Lang=1&imageID=148545&format=large

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
 
C

Colin Campbell

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> IMPORTANT ROAD RIDING CASE
>
> Mr. Percy Letchford, of the Finchley Tricycle Club, was summoned at
> the Brentford Petty Sessions, on Saturday last, for "furious riding"
> in the Kew Bridge Road, Brentford.
>
> P.C. 219 T stated that on the evening of the 14th he saw defendant and
> several other riders on bicycles and tricycles, riding at twelve miles
> an hour [1]. They passed him, and he called to them to stop; they did
> not do so, and he then ran after them, and caught hold of defendant's
> wheel, who, on being stopped, refused his name and address, preferring
> to go to the police station.
>
> When there he (the constable) charged him with furious driving.
>
> In cross-examination by Mr. Horace Avory, who appeared for the
> defendant, the constable admitted that defendant was not upset by
> being stopped; that the distance he ran was 20 yards; that defendant
> was 10 yards from the kerb (there being no kerb), and that the road
> was 30 yards wide (it being as a fact only 40 feet wide); that he
> would swear that there were more than five riders (as a matter of fact
> there were M'Cullum and Letchford on tri's, and Weeks, Oliver Thorn,
> and Temple Nicholson on bi's) [2].
>
> Sergeant Walsh and Inspector Blake gave formal evidence as to what
> transpired at the police station, which is devoid of interest to
> cyclists.
>
> Mr. Horace Avory first disclaimed any wish to dispute that a tricycle
> was a "carriage" within the meaning of the Act, although he thought
> that even that was open to argument [3], and he then went on to state
> that having no technical knowledge of cycling himself he would leave
> the case to his witnesses, but previously he called attention to the
> absurdity of the constable's evidence, who stated that he met the
> riders, called on them to stop, waited to see if they did so, and then
> went after them and caught them all in 20 yards-—a practical
> impossibility if they were riding furiously.
>
> He then called, Mr. W. A. Smith, who appeared by subpoena, and stated
> that he had never seen Mr. Letchford until within two hours of the
> occurrence, but was riding back in his company.
>
> He said they were travelling about seven miles an hour; that no one
> except an expert could judge of the speed at which a machine
> travelled; that the machine in question was "geared down," so that in
> order to cover the same distance with ten revolutions of the wheel, as
> the machine which he (witness) was riding, the defendant would have to
> make 14 revolutions of his feet [4], which would naturally lead to a
> supposition that the defendant was spurting to catch the witness up.
>
> The Chairman then said that after the very lucid manner in which the
> witness had given his evidence, it was needless to call additional
> witnesses. It was clear that the constable had made a mistake, and the
> Bench would dismiss the summons.
>
> Mr. Horace Avory then stated that he had appeared on behalf of the
> Bicycle Union, but it must not be supposed for one moment that that
> body countenanced furious riding, but they thought that as this was
> clearly a mistaken charge they ought to defend it.
>
> --London Bicycle Club Gazette, 1882, p.67-8
>
> http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA68,M1
>
> [1] Actually, P.C. 219 T's claim that the riders blew past him at 12
> mph was not utterly plausible. A year earlier, the London Bicycle Club
> Gazette had covered the 1882 record of twenty miles in a hour:
>
> http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA181,M1
>
> [2] Er, as a matter of fact, P.C. 219 T was correct when he claimed
> that there were more than five riders. Five riders are listed by name,
> but a sixth rider will mysteriously appear later, W.A. Smith.
>
> [3] A common defense in early traffic cases was to claim that the
> well-established carriage laws did not apply to tricycles and bicycles
> because they were not carriages, a loophole eagerly exploited on both
> sides of the Atlantic.
>
> [4] The low gearing mentioned by the wily lawyer was for defendant
> Letchford's tricycle. Such lumbering beasts were usually geared down
> to deal with awkward seating and their weight, which was around 75
> pounds.
>
> A popular Coventry Rotary tricycle from that era:
>
> http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...30.50.1.45&Lang=1&imageID=165871&format=large
>
> A Salvo-style quadricycle (there's a fourth tiny trailing wheel) from
> that era:
>
> http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...r=II-78698&Lang=1&imageID=148545&format=large
>
> Cheers,
>
> Carl Fogel


Sure glad that justice prevailed!
 
C

* * Chas

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]om...
>
> IMPORTANT ROAD RIDING CASE
>
> Mr. Percy Letchford, of the Finchley Tricycle Club, was summoned at
> the Brentford Petty Sessions, on Saturday last, for "furious riding"
> in the Kew Bridge Road, Brentford.
>
> P.C. 219 T stated that on the evening of the 14th he saw defendant and
> several other riders on bicycles and tricycles, riding at twelve miles
> an hour [1]. They passed him, and he called to them to stop; they did
> not do so, and he then ran after them, and caught hold of defendant's
> wheel, who, on being stopped, refused his name and address, preferring
> to go to the police station.
>
> When there he (the constable) charged him with furious driving.
>
> In cross-examination by Mr. Horace Avory, who appeared for the
> defendant, the constable admitted that defendant was not upset by
> being stopped; that the distance he ran was 20 yards; that defendant
> was 10 yards from the kerb (there being no kerb), and that the road
> was 30 yards wide (it being as a fact only 40 feet wide); that he
> would swear that there were more than five riders (as a matter of fact
> there were M'Cullum and Letchford on tri's, and Weeks, Oliver Thorn,
> and Temple Nicholson on bi's) [2].
>
> Sergeant Walsh and Inspector Blake gave formal evidence as to what
> transpired at the police station, which is devoid of interest to
> cyclists.
>
> Mr. Horace Avory first disclaimed any wish to dispute that a tricycle
> was a "carriage" within the meaning of the Act, although he thought
> that even that was open to argument [3], and he then went on to state
> that having no technical knowledge of cycling himself he would leave
> the case to his witnesses, but previously he called attention to the
> absurdity of the constable's evidence, who stated that he met the
> riders, called on them to stop, waited to see if they did so, and then
> went after them and caught them all in 20 yards--a practical
> impossibility if they were riding furiously.
>
> He then called, Mr. W. A. Smith, who appeared by subpoena, and stated
> that he had never seen Mr. Letchford until within two hours of the
> occurrence, but was riding back in his company.
>
> He said they were travelling about seven miles an hour; that no one
> except an expert could judge of the speed at which a machine
> travelled; that the machine in question was "geared down," so that in
> order to cover the same distance with ten revolutions of the wheel, as
> the machine which he (witness) was riding, the defendant would have to
> make 14 revolutions of his feet [4], which would naturally lead to a
> supposition that the defendant was spurting to catch the witness up.
>
> The Chairman then said that after the very lucid manner in which the
> witness had given his evidence, it was needless to call additional
> witnesses. It was clear that the constable had made a mistake, and the
> Bench would dismiss the summons.
>
> Mr. Horace Avory then stated that he had appeared on behalf of the
> Bicycle Union, but it must not be supposed for one moment that that
> body countenanced furious riding, but they thought that as this was
> clearly a mistaken charge they ought to defend it.
>
> --London Bicycle Club Gazette, 1882, p.67-8
>
>

http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA68,M1
>
> [1] Actually, P.C. 219 T's claim that the riders blew past him at 12
> mph was not utterly plausible. A year earlier, the London Bicycle Club
> Gazette had covered the 1882 record of twenty miles in a hour:
>
>

http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA181,M1
>
> [2] Er, as a matter of fact, P.C. 219 T was correct when he claimed
> that there were more than five riders. Five riders are listed by name,
> but a sixth rider will mysteriously appear later, W.A. Smith.
>
> [3] A common defense in early traffic cases was to claim that the
> well-established carriage laws did not apply to tricycles and bicycles
> because they were not carriages, a loophole eagerly exploited on both
> sides of the Atlantic.
>
> [4] The low gearing mentioned by the wily lawyer was for defendant
> Letchford's tricycle. Such lumbering beasts were usually geared down
> to deal with awkward seating and their weight, which was around 75
> pounds.
>
> A popular Coventry Rotary tricycle from that era:
>
>

http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...30.50.1.45&Lang=1&imageID=165871&format=large
>
> A Salvo-style quadricycle (there's a fourth tiny trailing wheel) from
> that era:
>
>

http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...r=II-78698&Lang=1&imageID=148545&format=large
>
> Cheers,
>
> Carl Fogel


"I was proceeding in a Southerly direction, milord, when I heard uh,
strange
sounds coming from the Walldor place, milord. A sort of boogie-woogie
music
was being played. On further investigation, I saw the defendant standing
there
with a guitar and an old hat on the floor collecting pennies. Well, I
decided that
uh, he was contravening a breach of the peace, there as there was a
traffic jam
about five miles long down on Walldor street, wondering what all the uh,
fuss was about, so then I arrested the uh, defendant"

Long John Baldry "Don't Try To Lay No Boogie Woogie On The King Of Rock
And Roll"

Chas.
 
On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 13:14:51 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

>
>IMPORTANT ROAD RIDING CASE
>
>Mr. Percy Letchford, of the Finchley Tricycle Club, was summoned at
>the Brentford Petty Sessions, on Saturday last, for "furious riding"
>in the Kew Bridge Road, Brentford.
>
>P.C. 219 T stated that on the evening of the 14th he saw defendant and
>several other riders on bicycles and tricycles, riding at twelve miles
>an hour [1]. They passed him, and he called to them to stop; they did
>not do so, and he then ran after them, and caught hold of defendant's
>wheel, who, on being stopped, refused his name and address, preferring
>to go to the police station.
>
>When there he (the constable) charged him with furious driving.
>
>In cross-examination by Mr. Horace Avory, who appeared for the
>defendant, the constable admitted that defendant was not upset by
>being stopped; that the distance he ran was 20 yards; that defendant
>was 10 yards from the kerb (there being no kerb), and that the road
>was 30 yards wide (it being as a fact only 40 feet wide); that he
>would swear that there were more than five riders (as a matter of fact
>there were M'Cullum and Letchford on tri's, and Weeks, Oliver Thorn,
>and Temple Nicholson on bi's) [2].
>
>Sergeant Walsh and Inspector Blake gave formal evidence as to what
>transpired at the police station, which is devoid of interest to
>cyclists.
>
>Mr. Horace Avory first disclaimed any wish to dispute that a tricycle
>was a "carriage" within the meaning of the Act, although he thought
>that even that was open to argument [3], and he then went on to state
>that having no technical knowledge of cycling himself he would leave
>the case to his witnesses, but previously he called attention to the
>absurdity of the constable's evidence, who stated that he met the
>riders, called on them to stop, waited to see if they did so, and then
>went after them and caught them all in 20 yards-—a practical
>impossibility if they were riding furiously.
>
>He then called, Mr. W. A. Smith, who appeared by subpoena, and stated
>that he had never seen Mr. Letchford until within two hours of the
>occurrence, but was riding back in his company.
>
>He said they were travelling about seven miles an hour; that no one
>except an expert could judge of the speed at which a machine
>travelled; that the machine in question was "geared down," so that in
>order to cover the same distance with ten revolutions of the wheel, as
>the machine which he (witness) was riding, the defendant would have to
>make 14 revolutions of his feet [4], which would naturally lead to a
>supposition that the defendant was spurting to catch the witness up.
>
>The Chairman then said that after the very lucid manner in which the
>witness had given his evidence, it was needless to call additional
>witnesses. It was clear that the constable had made a mistake, and the
>Bench would dismiss the summons.
>
>Mr. Horace Avory then stated that he had appeared on behalf of the
>Bicycle Union, but it must not be supposed for one moment that that
>body countenanced furious riding, but they thought that as this was
>clearly a mistaken charge they ought to defend it.
>
>--London Bicycle Club Gazette, 1882, p.67-8
>
>http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA68,M1
>
>[1] Actually, P.C. 219 T's claim that the riders blew past him at 12
>mph was not utterly plausible. A year earlier, the London Bicycle Club
>Gazette had covered the 1882 record of twenty miles in a hour:
>
>http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA181,M1
>
>[2] Er, as a matter of fact, P.C. 219 T was correct when he claimed
>that there were more than five riders. Five riders are listed by name,
>but a sixth rider will mysteriously appear later, W.A. Smith.
>
>[3] A common defense in early traffic cases was to claim that the
>well-established carriage laws did not apply to tricycles and bicycles
>because they were not carriages, a loophole eagerly exploited on both
>sides of the Atlantic.
>
>[4] The low gearing mentioned by the wily lawyer was for defendant
>Letchford's tricycle. Such lumbering beasts were usually geared down
>to deal with awkward seating and their weight, which was around 75
>pounds.
>
>A popular Coventry Rotary tricycle from that era:
>
>http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...30.50.1.45&Lang=1&imageID=165871&format=large
>
>A Salvo-style quadricycle (there's a fourth tiny trailing wheel) from
>that era:
>
>http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/scri...r=II-78698&Lang=1&imageID=148545&format=large
>
>Cheers,
>
>Carl Fogel


Oh, dear! The London Bicycle Club was later informed that--oops!--some
particulars of the case were incorrect . . .

The impartiality of the magistrates is somewhat questionable, given
the comment at the end.

IMPORTANT TRICYCLE CASE

We are informed that the account published in a contemporary, and
copied into this paper, of the above case was incorrect. The following
particulars have been sent up by one of our members who was present,
and will no doubt be interesting to our readers

Percy Tilt Letchford (Finchley Tricycle Club), well known to many
members of the L.B.C. (especially those in the N.W. Division), was
summoned at the Brentford Petty Sessions on Saturday, the 29th ultimo,
to answer a charge of furiously driving his tricycle to the common
danger of the public in High Street, Brentford, on Saturday, the 15th
April, at nine p.m.

The case was defended by Mr. Horace Avery, who appeared on behalf of
the Bicycle Union. There was a full bench of magistrates sitting, of
whom Mr. Glossop [1] was Chairman.

Police-constable John Roberts, 219 T, having been sworn, gave evidence
as follows: About nine p.m. on the day in question I was on duty in
High Street, Brentford, when the defendant, with six or seven
bicyclists, rode by at a furious pace. I called to them to stop, but
they did not do so, but one of them called out, "Why, he's drunk, give
him a run."

I then ran after them, and took hold of the defendant's tricycle and
stopped him; I then demanded his name and address, which he refused to
give, but said he would go to the Police Station, which he did, and I
there charged him with furious driving.

By the Bench: At what rate was he riding

About twelve miles per hour, your worship.

The Chairman: Twelve miles per hour! that is a very fast rate.

Cross-examined by Mr. Avery: How many of these gentlemen were there?
you said, I think, six or seven.

Seven, I believe.

Mr. Avery: Will you swear there were seven?

No reply.

Mr. A.: Well, were there six?

P.C.: Yes; I will swear there were six.

Mr. A.: Mind, sir, all these gentlemen are here present.

P.C.: There were two on tricycles and four on bicycles.

Mr. A.: How far did you run?

P.C.: About twenty yards.

Mr. A.: Where were you standing?

P.C.: Opposite the "Waggon and Horses" inn.

Mr. A.: Were you not opposite the "Royal Tar"?

P.C.: No, I was walking up from Kew Bridge, and they passed me when
opposite the "Waggon and Horses."

Mr. A.: Were many people or vehicles in the roadway?

P.C.: I did not see any vehicles, but several people were in the
roadway.

Mr. A.: How far was defendant riding from the kerb?

P.C.: About ten yards.

Mr. A.: Ten yards! Why, how broad is the road there?

P.C.: About thirty yards, I should say.

(N.B. The extreme breadth is forty feet)

The constable then gave evidence as to what occurred at the Police
Station, as to charging Mr. Letchford, etc. Sergeant Walsh stated that
the defendant and the other riders, when at the station, were greatly
excited, and that Mr. Letchford said Constable 219 T was drunk.

Mr. Avery: Did he not say, "Why, he must have been drunk to have
stopped me in such a manner?"

Sergeant Walsh: I understood him to say he was drunk.

Inspector Rowling (from the body of the Court): I may say, your
worship, that a great number of bicyclists and—-

Mr. Avery: I object to any general statement; please confine yourself
to the case in point.

The inspector sat down.

Sergeant Blake then gave evidence to the effect that 219 T said the
defendant was racing against the others, and that they were riding
three abreast. He, however, appeared to know nothing about the case
beyond hearsay evidence, which was of no value.

Mr. Avery, before calling any witnesses, said he did not wish to make
any objection to the summons on the ground of a technical informality,
but that the defendant was charged under a wrong Act.

The Chairman: The defendant is not charged, he is summoned.

Mr. A.: I accept your correction. It has been ruled that a bicycle is
a carriage within the meaning of the Act, but at present there is no
Act specially legislating for tricycles.

He would not, however, question the legal responsibility of a
tricyclist to obey the ordinary rules regulating street traffic. What,
however, he would point out was, that he claimed the same right for a
tricyclist in the matter of speed as was allowed to a gentleman
driving his private trap, and he would venture to submit that for such
vehicles a speed of even 12 miles per hour under certain circumstances
would not be considered excessive by the bench. The question of
furious driving could not alone rest upon speed. For instance, a rate
of 14 or 15 miles per hour on a country road, where there was no
traffic, would not be considered a furious rate, while half that speed
in a crowded thoroughfare would certainly be so. He would, however,
say no more, but call his witnesses, who, he ventured to think, would
satisfactorily prove to the Bench that the constable had made an error
of judgment in charging defendant.

He then called Mr. W. A. Smith, who was present on a subpoena, and who
stated that he had met Mr. Letchford for the first time that
evening—-that, in company with Mr. Letchford and three bicyclists, he
was riding through Brentford at about nine p.m. on the day mentioned,
and that he was leading the way. They all rode at a walking pace
through Brentford town, and in single file, as the streets were much
crowded.

On arriving at the broader road, by Kew Waterworks, they increased
their speed to about seven miles per hour, certainly not more. He and
defendant were slightly in advance of the three bicyclists, and he was
about two lengths of his tricycle ahead of defendant. He heard the
constable call out, but, as he knew they were riding legally he took
no notice; he heard a scuffle, and saw 219 T seize defendant's near
side wheel, and stop him. He did not return, as he objected, for
business reasons, to be mixed up in it at all.

By Mr. Avery: What would have been the result if the constable had
stopped him in such a manner when riding at twelve miles per hour?

Witness: I think he must inevitably have fallen out of the tricycle.
The constable also would have been damaged.

Mr. Avery: Why, in your opinion, did the constable think the defendant
was racing. You said, I believe, that you were leading him at the
time?

The Chairman: I should ask witness to incriminate himself.

Witness: I accept the situation, your worship. If the defendant is
guilty, so am I.

Mr. Avery repeated his question.

Witness : The defendant was riding a "Devon" [2] very much "geared
down," which means that speed is sacrificed to gain power, and to
obtain one revolution of the wheel he would have to make his pedals
revolve about once and one-third ; or, to put it more plainly, to
cover the same distance in ten revolutions of wheel as I should on my
tricycle, which is a "Humber" [3], he would move his feet round from
thirteen to fourteen times, and so give an inexperienced looker-on the
idea that he was spurting to catch up or race by his comrade.

The Chairman: I think, after the lucid manner in which this evidence
is given, we cannot but come to the conclusion that the constable was
mistaken, and we therefore dismiss the summons.

Mr. Avery informed the Bench that he was instructed in this case by
the Bicycle Union, a body formed to watch over the interests of the
sport. It must not be supposed for one moment that they would or did
countenance furious riding on the roads, indeed, they set their face
resolutely against it; but in the case under notice they were of
opinion that the charge was unjustifiable, and so defended it.

Messrs. 0. Thorn, E. A. Weekes, and Nicholson (the well-known crack
road rider) were present as witnesses, but were not called.

In the magistrates' private room an interesting discussion as to the
best tricycles for middle-aged persons afterwards ensued between two
of the justices and McCullum Hill.

One of the former is a rider of a "Special Salvo" [4].


http://books.google.com/books?id=eXNMAAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PRA2-PA76,M1

[1] No relation to Tuppy Glossop, according to Jeeves.

[2] Figure 145 in Sharp's "Bicycle's & Tricycles" shows a Devon
tricycle:

http://books.google.com/books?id=6Kk1AAAAMAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PPA167,M1

[3] Back view of the racy Humber tricycle:

http://books.google.com/books?id=Kl8MAAAAYAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PPA444,M1

[4] The impartial magistrate rode a Starley Special Salvo, which
became the Royal Salvo when Queen Victoria ordered two in 1881 after
seeing Starley's niece trundling around on one. Here's an 1878 photo
of Starley in a Salvo quadricycle, whose rear wheel shrank as the
years passed:
http://i10.tinypic.com/6fys4tg.jpg

Smaller hind wheel Royal Salvos in an 1884 ad:
http://i6.tinypic.com/4tibe3t.jpg

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"* * Chas" <[email protected]> wrote:

> "I was proceeding in a Southerly direction, milord, when I heard uh,
> strange sounds coming from the Walldor place, milord. A sort of
> boogie-woogie music was being played. On further investigation, I saw the
> defendant standing there with a guitar and an old hat on the floor
> collecting pennies. Well, I decided that uh, he was contravening a breach
> of the peace, there as there was a traffic jam about five miles long down
> on Walldor street, wondering what all the uh, fuss was about, so then I
> arrested the uh, defendant"
>
> Long John Baldry "Don't Try To Lay No Boogie Woogie On The King Of Rock And
> Roll"


Also well covered by Jack Dupree. That is Wardour street.

Boojie Woojie music, forsooth!

--
Michael Press
 
C

* * Chas

Guest
"Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "* * Chas" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > "I was proceeding in a Southerly direction, milord, when I heard uh,
> > strange sounds coming from the Walldor place, milord. A sort of
> > boogie-woogie music was being played. On further investigation, I saw

the
> > defendant standing there with a guitar and an old hat on the floor
> > collecting pennies. Well, I decided that uh, he was contravening a

breach
> > of the peace, there as there was a traffic jam about five miles long

down
> > on Walldor street, wondering what all the uh, fuss was about, so then

I
> > arrested the uh, defendant"
> >
> > Long John Baldry "Don't Try To Lay No Boogie Woogie On The King Of

Rock And
> > Roll"

>
> Also well covered by Jack Dupree. That is Wardour street.
>
> Boojie Woojie music, forsooth!
>
> --
> Michael Press


“Uh, just one moment, officer. Wh-what is this boojie-woojie music here we
’re
talking about?”

About three lines down is when that GREAT guitar riff kicks in! ;-)

Chas.
 
C

* * Chas

Guest
"Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "* * Chas" <verktygjunk[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > "I was proceeding in a Southerly direction, milord, when I heard uh,
> > strange sounds coming from the Walldor place, milord. A sort of
> > boogie-woogie music was being played. On further investigation, I saw

the
> > defendant standing there with a guitar and an old hat on the floor
> > collecting pennies. Well, I decided that uh, he was contravening a

breach
> > of the peace, there as there was a traffic jam about five miles long

down
> > on Walldor street, wondering what all the uh, fuss was about, so then

I
> > arrested the uh, defendant"
> >
> > Long John Baldry "Don't Try To Lay No Boogie Woogie On The King Of

Rock And
> > Roll"

>
> Also well covered by Jack Dupree. That is Wardour street.
>
> Boojie Woojie music, forsooth!
>
> --
> Michael Press


Oh and by the way, that's Elton John on the ivories with Ron Wood on
guitar and Rod Stewart in the background....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsr4UsjgGuA

Chas.
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"* * Chas" <[email protected]> wrote:

> "Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > In article <[email protected]>,
> > "* * Chas" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > > "I was proceeding in a Southerly direction, milord, when I heard uh,
> > > strange sounds coming from the Walldor place, milord. A sort of
> > > boogie-woogie music was being played. On further investigation, I saw

> the
> > > defendant standing there with a guitar and an old hat on the floor
> > > collecting pennies. Well, I decided that uh, he was contravening a

> breach
> > > of the peace, there as there was a traffic jam about five miles long

> down
> > > on Walldor street, wondering what all the uh, fuss was about, so then

> I
> > > arrested the uh, defendant"
> > >
> > > Long John Baldry "Don't Try To Lay No Boogie Woogie On The King Of

> Rock And
> > > Roll"

> >
> > Also well covered by Jack Dupree. That is Wardour street.
> >
> > Boojie Woojie music, forsooth!

>
> Oh and by the way, that's Elton John on the ivories with Ron Wood on
> guitar and Rod Stewart in the background....
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsr4UsjgGuA


He shook the dust loose from that piano.

--
Michael Press
 

Similar threads