Pork Soup?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Saffire, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. Saffire

    Saffire Guest

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***

    I like pork ribs and buy the cheap kind on occasion (and sometimes the
    more tender babybacks, but they're kind of expensive). However, I don't
    like the thick, diagonal part because it has very little fat and is dry
    and tough to chew. It DOES have a bone in it, but it's not really a
    "rib" bone. It makes up a large portion of the huge rack of ribs,
    however, and I don't want to waste it, so I seal them up with the
    Foodsaver and put them in the freezer, thinking I'll come up with
    SOMETHING to do with them.

    I've been thinking of making a pork-vegetable soup with it. You always
    hear about chicken soup and beef soup and all kinds of other soups, but
    you rarely (if EVER) hear about people routinely making or offering PORK
    soup. Is there a reason for that, other than religious beliefs about
    eating pork? I know ham and hambones are used in making things like
    split-pea soup, after all.

    --
    Saffire
    205/134/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    Saffire <[email protected]> wrote:

    > *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    > in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
    >
    > I like pork ribs and buy the cheap kind on occasion (and sometimes the
    > more tender babybacks, but they're kind of expensive). However, I don't
    > like the thick, diagonal part because it has very little fat and is dry
    > and tough to chew. It DOES have a bone in it, but it's not really a
    > "rib" bone. It makes up a large portion of the huge rack of ribs,
    > however, and I don't want to waste it, so I seal them up with the
    > Foodsaver and put them in the freezer, thinking I'll come up with
    > SOMETHING to do with them.
    >
    > I've been thinking of making a pork-vegetable soup with it. You always
    > hear about chicken soup and beef soup and all kinds of other soups, but
    > you rarely (if EVER) hear about people routinely making or offering PORK
    > soup. Is there a reason for that, other than religious beliefs about
    > eating pork? I know ham and hambones are used in making things like
    > split-pea soup, after all.


    Look into Chinese cooking, and you'll find all kinds of pork soups or
    soups based on pork stock. I love a nice pork stock simmered with tofu,
    napa, mushrooms, etc. in it, maybe with some shiritaki in place of wheat
    noodles. Or a lovely sour-hot soup loaded with bamboo shoots, tofu,
    lily buds, pork slices, stirred egg, vinegar, black pepper, and so on.

    Priscilla
    --
    "Inside every older person is a younger person -- wondering what
    the hell happened." -- Cora Harvey Armstrong
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Saffire <[email protected]> wrote:

    > *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    > in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
    >
    > I like pork ribs and buy the cheap kind on occasion (and sometimes the
    > more tender babybacks, but they're kind of expensive). However, I don't
    > like the thick, diagonal part because it has very little fat and is dry
    > and tough to chew. It DOES have a bone in it, but it's not really a
    > "rib" bone. It makes up a large portion of the huge rack of ribs,
    > however, and I don't want to waste it, so I seal them up with the
    > Foodsaver and put them in the freezer, thinking I'll come up with
    > SOMETHING to do with them.
    >
    > I've been thinking of making a pork-vegetable soup with it. You always
    > hear about chicken soup and beef soup and all kinds of other soups, but
    > you rarely (if EVER) hear about people routinely making or offering PORK
    > soup. Is there a reason for that, other than religious beliefs about
    > eating pork? I know ham and hambones are used in making things like
    > split-pea soup, after all.


    I've used cubed pork to make pork with black soy beans. :)
    It was quite good.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  4. Suze

    Suze Guest

    Quoting Kris D via WeightAdviser.com:
    >REALLY???
    >
    >--
    >I don't get you


    You don't get what?

    You know what -I- don't get? Folks that continually insist on
    responding to messages that they can't be bothered to quote properly
    -- it's like everyone else should just be expected to figure it out.
    If they can't, oh well.

    Below is the post that your reference header indicates you were
    responding to:

    (however your response just wouldn't make sense in terms of this
    message...)

    ********************
    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's
    appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***

    I like pork ribs and buy the cheap kind on occasion (and sometimes the
    more tender babybacks, but they're kind of expensive). However, I
    don't
    like the thick, diagonal part because it has very little fat and is
    dry
    and tough to chew. It DOES have a bone in it, but it's not really a
    "rib" bone. It makes up a large portion of the huge rack of ribs,
    however, and I don't want to waste it, so I seal them up with the
    Foodsaver and put them in the freezer, thinking I'll come up with
    SOMETHING to do with them.

    I've been thinking of making a pork-vegetable soup with it. You
    always
    hear about chicken soup and beef soup and all kinds of other soups,
    but
    you rarely (if EVER) hear about people routinely making or offering
    PORK
    soup. Is there a reason for that, other than religious beliefs about
    eating pork? I know ham and hambones are used in making things like
    split-pea soup, after all.

    --
    Saffire
    205/134/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's
    appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
  5. Saffire

    Saffire Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Saffire <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    > > in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
    > >
    > > I like pork ribs and buy the cheap kind on occasion (and sometimes the
    > > more tender babybacks, but they're kind of expensive). However, I don't
    > > like the thick, diagonal part because it has very little fat and is dry
    > > and tough to chew. It DOES have a bone in it, but it's not really a
    > > "rib" bone. It makes up a large portion of the huge rack of ribs,
    > > however, and I don't want to waste it, so I seal them up with the
    > > Foodsaver and put them in the freezer, thinking I'll come up with
    > > SOMETHING to do with them.
    > >
    > > I've been thinking of making a pork-vegetable soup with it. You always
    > > hear about chicken soup and beef soup and all kinds of other soups, but
    > > you rarely (if EVER) hear about people routinely making or offering PORK
    > > soup. Is there a reason for that, other than religious beliefs about
    > > eating pork? I know ham and hambones are used in making things like
    > > split-pea soup, after all.

    >
    > Look into Chinese cooking, and you'll find all kinds of pork soups or
    > soups based on pork stock. I love a nice pork stock simmered with tofu,
    > napa, mushrooms, etc. in it, maybe with some shiritaki in place of wheat
    > noodles. Or a lovely sour-hot soup loaded with bamboo shoots, tofu,
    > lily buds, pork slices, stirred egg, vinegar, black pepper, and so on.


    Good point -- thanks!

    --
    Saffire
    205/134/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
  6. Dusty Bleher

    Dusty Bleher Guest

    "Saffire" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    ....
    > I've been thinking of making a pork-vegetable soup with it. You always
    > hear about chicken soup and beef soup and all kinds of other soups, but
    > you rarely (if EVER) hear about people routinely making or offering PORK

    Soup, or more properly stock, is stock. You can make it of most anything.
    Just use your pork bones as if they were beef, chicken, or turkey.

    Cooking them for the stock is fine, just don't overcook them, as the
    proteins and other things dissolved out of the bones can make the stock sort
    of "sticky" in the mouth. A little "sticky" is okay, but too much is kinda
    icky to some folks. To keep that from happening, drain some of the stock
    after the first few hours of simmering, and add more water...or, just dilute
    the stock you do make with water as you make your soups (which is what I
    do).

    > soup. Is there a reason for that, other than religious beliefs about
    > eating pork? I know ham and hambones are used in making things like
    > split-pea soup, after all.

    People get "religious" about all sorts of things, including doing or not
    doing LC. Enjoy your pork stock and don't worry about the pulpit pounders.

    With cooler fall weather and winter on the way, you'll love some of the
    great soups you'll be able to make with it. Make the liquid part ahead, and
    then when you heat it to serve it, line up the things you're gonna put into
    it by order of how long they have to cook to be edible. Once it's hot, I
    toss them in, ending with things like fresh spinach, cresses, and other
    tender greens last for no more than 30 seconds or so.

    I pretty well go through the fridge and use whatever I find. If you're more
    disciplined than I and have to buy stuff, you can add: cabbage, rutabagas,
    celery stalks & root, a few carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini and
    other squashes, and most any other green or root vegetable. For some
    especially different tastes, try a cut up a fennel bulb...ginger
    root...red-pepper flakes, etc...

    Above all, have fun, and enjoy the process!


    L8r all,
    DustyB
    SanJose
    ....
     
  7. Saffire

    Saffire Guest

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***

    In article <[email protected]>, bakerboy2
    @innerREMOVETHISlodge.com says...
    > "Saffire" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > ...
    > Cooking them for the stock is fine, just don't overcook them,


    > I pretty well go through the fridge and use whatever I find. If you're more
    > disciplined than I and have to buy stuff, you can add: cabbage, rutabagas,
    > celery stalks & root, a few carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini and
    > other squashes, and most any other green or root vegetable. For some
    > especially different tastes, try a cut up a fennel bulb...ginger
    > root...red-pepper flakes, etc...


    Thanks, Dusty, good suggestions! I also use what's on hand, but also
    usually buy the following staples for ALL my soups: onion, garlic
    celery. Then, depending on my mood, I might get some or all of the
    following: cabbage, zucchini, mushrooms, spinach, bok choy and, lately,
    jicama. The jicama softens some, depending on the size it's cut to, but
    generally retains the texture (and looks) of a partially cooked potato.
    It's a GREAT source of fiber and vitamin C (44%/cup as opposed to the
    same amount of carrots). I have it practically every day in one form or
    another.

    --
    Saffire
    205/134/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
  8. Dusty Bleher

    Dusty Bleher Guest

    "Saffire" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    ....
    >> other squashes, and most any other green or root vegetable. For some
    >> especially different tastes, try a cut up a fennel bulb...ginger
    >> root...red-pepper flakes, etc...

    >
    > Thanks, Dusty, good suggestions! I also use what's on hand, but also

    My pleasure, ma'am.

    > usually buy the following staples for ALL my soups: onion, garlic
    > celery. Then, depending on my mood, I might get some or all of the
    > following: cabbage, zucchini, mushrooms, spinach, bok choy and, lately,
    > jicama. The jicama softens some, depending on the size it's cut to, but
    > generally retains the texture (and looks) of a partially cooked potato.
    > It's a GREAT source of fiber and vitamin C (44%/cup as opposed to the
    > same amount of carrots). I have it practically every day in one form or
    > another.

    Yep. Right with ya on "the staples", Saffire. At one time or other I've
    used all of the items you listed. I especially like the Bok Choy. After I
    sent that last post off, I got to thinking about the paltry list I'd
    presented. I'm glad you filled it in some more... It's also good that you
    mentioned the Jicama. It's often overlooked. I also often cube turnips
    into the soup. There's literally nothing you can't put into a basic soup
    stock.

    It's so simple to make wonderful soups. Just "do it" and don't worry too
    much about the contents. About the only thing I take care with is that
    tender, easily cooked things go in last. For instance, in the Bok Choy, I
    slit the leaf part lengthwise (to get more bite-sized pieces) and then cut
    crosswise until I get to the stalk part. I separate the greens from the
    stalk part. The stalk part goes in a few minutes before it's done, and the
    greens part about 30-seconds before it's done. And the timing is only
    approximate, so don't get all hung up on it. We like things closer to rare
    or undercooked. If you don't, cook things longer...

    One of our favorite things is to shred up cabbage (coleslaw style), and put
    a pile of it into the soup bowl, and serve the soup over it. The heat from
    the soup just barely softens the cabbage. So the soup "eats" crunchy.
    Yummy!

    If your taste goes towards thicker soups, you can toss in a small handful or
    so of bulgur, or brown rice, or lentils, or millet, or any number of other,
    similar, thickeners. Even a tablespoon or two of flour isn't going to blow
    you out of the water carb wise. You just have to use your heads, people.
    You don't have to run right out and get "low-carb" stuff to replace
    thickeners. Just use "normal", wholesome ingredients. Use them judiciously
    and enjoy eating, without making it an ordeal of substitution.

    Above all, if you ain't havin' fun, it's not worth doin'...


    L8r all,
    Dusty
    ....
     
  9. On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 15:08:04 -0700, Saffire
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >*** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    >in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***


    I wasn't going to say anything until I got caught up, but now I am.

    You might want to change your boilerplate from "it's" to "its."
     
  10. Saffire

    Saffire Guest

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- its appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    > On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 15:08:04 -0700, Saffire
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >*** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- it's appearance
    > >in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***

    >
    > I wasn't going to say anything until I got caught up, but now I am.
    >
    > You might want to change your boilerplate from "it's" to "its."


    Oops -- thank you for letting me know! I DO know the difference, but
    the fingers tend to do some things on automatic pilot :)

    --
    Saffire
    205/134/125
    Atkins since 6/14/03
    Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

    *** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- its appearance
    in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
     
  11. Saffire wrote:
    >
    > I've been thinking of making a pork-vegetable soup with it. You always
    > hear about chicken soup and beef soup and all kinds of other soups, but
    > you rarely (if EVER) hear about people routinely making or offering PORK
    > soup. Is there a reason for that, other than religious beliefs about
    > eating pork? I know ham and hambones are used in making things like
    > split-pea soup, after all.


    I've made pork broth and it's just fine. I suspect that
    pork bones have less gelatin or whatever protein it is
    that thickens compared to beef and chicken. For that
    matter lamb, duck and goose make broth that rules. They
    too appear to have more of that thickening protein.

    If you want thin soup that tastes good, as opposed to
    soup with a thicker texture that tastes good, pork will
    work fine in this theory.

    Note that adding legumes will supply thickening from the
    veggie. Not a huge support for my theory but there you go.
     
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