Porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by mary, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. mary

    mary Guest

    I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but I
    am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?

    Thanks

    Tom
     
    Tags:


  2. Christine

    Christine Guest

    "mary" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    > family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    > porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but
    > I
    > am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    > sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >


    Probably Taylor pork roll. Extremely popular in New Jersey. Very tasty for
    breakfast. Also becoming available in other parts of the country. We have
    it in Texas, but I would have never have heard of it without knowing an
    acquaintance from New Jersey.

    Chris in Pearland, TX
     
  3. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "mary" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    > family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    > porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but
    > I
    > am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    > sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?


    Go over by the bacon case and look up. You might not see Taylor Pork Roll,
    but maybe another brand. It might be in a roll wrapped in burlap, or in
    boxes
    of slices. Use a good American cheese and soft Kaiser rolls.

    Heart attack on a plate but sometimes, what the hell.

    nancy
     
  4. Stan Horwitz

    Stan Horwitz Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    > family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    > porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but I
    > am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    > sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?


    Pork roll IS the meat. Speaking as a citizen of the Garden State, Taylor
    pork roll is similar to Canadian bacon or bologna. If you are curious to
    try some pork roll, you might be able to find it in a supermarket in the
    section where the bacon and breakfast sausage are sold. You can also buy
    Taylor pork roll online.
     
  5. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Stan Horwitz wrote:

    > Pork roll IS the meat. Speaking as a citizen of the Garden State, Taylor
    > pork roll is similar to Canadian bacon or bologna. If you are curious to
    > try some pork roll, you might be able to find it in a supermarket in the
    > section where the bacon and breakfast sausage are sold. You can also buy
    > Taylor pork roll online.


    Publix supermarkets in the south carry small boxes
    of it. I found some this week. I was pretty
    excited to get some.
    I personally like it with toast and apple butter,
    no eggs or cheese for me.
    Goomba
     
  6. TINY

    TINY Guest

    I live in Neptune N.J. not to far from there and more then like lee it's
    Taylor pork roll but it could be Trenton pork roll which is made by the same
    company
    "Stan Horwitz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "mary" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    >> family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is
    >> a
    >> porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made,
    >> but I
    >> am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    >> sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?

    >
    > Pork roll IS the meat. Speaking as a citizen of the Garden State, Taylor
    > pork roll is similar to Canadian bacon or bologna. If you are curious to
    > try some pork roll, you might be able to find it in a supermarket in the
    > section where the bacon and breakfast sausage are sold. You can also buy
    > Taylor pork roll online.
     
  7. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 20:31:59 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    >family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    >porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but I
    >am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    >sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?
    >
    >Thanks


    The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    Spam.

    Disclaimer: I am one of the people who never acquired a taste for the
    stuff. :>

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  8. limey

    limey Guest

    "mary" wrote in message
    >I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    > family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    > porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but
    > I
    > am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    > sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Tom


    Since the diner is in New Jersey, it's most likely the meat is Taylor pork
    roll. I like the slices that are cut off a roll, rather than the pre-cut
    slices in the package - but the slices are a good place to start in case you
    don't care for it. As others have said - near the bacon in the supermarket
    cases.
    Yum, I love the stuff, on a bun. Must remember to pick some up.

    Dora
     
  9. Christine

    Christine Guest

    "Dog3" <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] (Curly Sue) wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 20:31:59 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about
    >>>his family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's
    >>>specialty is a porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes
    >>>how it is made, but I am not clear the type of meat that is used for
    >>>the "porkroll" part of the sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks

    >>
    >> The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    >> Spam.
    >>
    >> Disclaimer: I am one of the people who never acquired a taste for the
    >> stuff. :>
    >>
    >> Sue(tm)
    >> Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!

    >
    > IMO spam is gross. I have little tolerance for the convenience meats.
    > Well
    > except for the ham salad, spread, whatever you call it. Potted meat is an
    > abomination but I love Vienna Sausages ;) When mother was pregnant with my
    > kid brother (I was 18 years old) she ate something picked. They were
    > nasty
    > looking.
    >
    > Michael


    I never found Taylor pork roll to have much in common with Spam... agreed
    Spam is gross. As someone else mentioned Taylor pork roll is somewhat
    similar to Canadian bacon, but it has a slightly sweet taste to it. I liked
    it immediately when I tried it so I didn't have to acquire a taste for it.
    My husband doesn't care for it.

    Chris in Pearland, TX
     
  10. limey

    limey Guest

    "Dog3" wrote in message >
    (Curly Sue) wrote >>
    >> The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    >> Spam.
    >>
    >> Disclaimer: I am one of the people who never acquired a taste for the
    >> stuff. :>
    >>
    >> Sue(tm)

    >
    > IMO spam is gross. I have little tolerance for the convenience meats.
    > Well
    > except for the ham salad, spread, whatever you call it. Potted meat is an
    > abomination but I love Vienna Sausages ;) When mother was pregnant with my
    > kid brother (I was 18 years old) she ate something picked. They were
    > nasty
    > looking.
    >
    > Michael


    TPR isn't like Spam, Michael. It's like - well - just like Taylor Pork
    Roll. I suppose it's something you either like or you don't.

    Dora
     
  11. Christine

    Christine Guest

    "Arri London" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > Curly Sue wrote:
    >>
    >> On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 18:40:43 GMT, "Christine"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >"Dog3" <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz> wrote in message
    >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> [email protected] (Curly Sue) wrote in
    >> >> news:[email protected]:
    >> >>
    >> >>> On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 20:31:59 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    >> >>> wrote:
    >> >>>
    >> >>>>I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about
    >> >>>>his family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's
    >> >>>>specialty is a porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes
    >> >>>>how it is made, but I am not clear the type of meat that is used for
    >> >>>>the "porkroll" part of the sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>>Thanks
    >> >>>
    >> >>> The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    >> >>> Spam.
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Disclaimer: I am one of the people who never acquired a taste for the
    >> >>> stuff. :>
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Sue(tm)
    >> >>> Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
    >> >>
    >> >> IMO spam is gross. I have little tolerance for the convenience meats.
    >> >> Well
    >> >> except for the ham salad, spread, whatever you call it. Potted meat is
    >> >> an
    >> >> abomination but I love Vienna Sausages ;) When mother was pregnant
    >> >> with my
    >> >> kid brother (I was 18 years old) she ate something picked. They were
    >> >> nasty
    >> >> looking.
    >> >>
    >> >> Michael
    >> >
    >> >I never found Taylor pork roll to have much in common with Spam...
    >> >agreed
    >> >Spam is gross. As someone else mentioned Taylor pork roll is somewhat
    >> >similar to Canadian bacon, but it has a slightly sweet taste to it. I
    >> >liked
    >> >it immediately when I tried it so I didn't have to acquire a taste for
    >> >it.
    >> >My husband doesn't care for it.
    >> >
    >> >Chris in Pearland, TX

    >>
    >> Well, that takes away one explanation- I guess it's not an acquired
    >> taste.
    >>
    >> I bought TPR when I lived in Trenton, and Canadian bacon is not what
    >> came to mind! }:)
    >>
    >> Sue(tm)
    >>

    >
    > Same here. Ate plenty of TPR when I lived in NJ and it's not the least
    > reminiscent of Canadian bacon or bologna.


    Actually I should have mentioned this before about Taylor Pork Roll in a
    previous post. While it doesn't taste similar at all to Canadian bacon it
    is prepared similarly. I cut into it a little bit around the edges to
    minimize curling and then pan fry in butter. Yum! Wish my husband liked
    it.

    Chris in Pearland, TX
     
  12. Curly Sue wrote:

    > On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 20:31:59 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    >>family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    >>porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but I
    >>am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    >>sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?

    >
    > The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    > Spam.


    Not really like Spam. Back in the 50's in my parents' South River, New
    Jersey resto, we served it sliced and fried with any of several other
    fixings. We called it "Taylor Ham" I guess because everybody else did.
    Sliced off a slab about 1/4 inch thick and cut four radial slits in it
    so it wouldn't "cup" while cooking. On a roll with other stuff.

    Pastorio
     
  13. Stark

    Stark Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, this one
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Curly Sue wrote:
    >
    > > On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 20:31:59 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >>I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    > >>family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    > >>porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but I
    > >>am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    > >>sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?

    > >
    > > The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    > > Spam.

    >
    > Not really like Spam. Back in the 50's in my parents' South River, New
    > Jersey resto, we served it sliced and fried with any of several other
    > fixings. We called it "Taylor Ham" I guess because everybody else did.
    > Sliced off a slab about 1/4 inch thick and cut four radial slits in it
    > so it wouldn't "cup" while cooking. On a roll with other stuff.
    >
    > Pastorio
    >

    It's a Taylor Pork Roll and it's available here in Memphis alongside
    all the Boar's Head products. I'm tempted. But the "acquired taste" bit
    bothers me. Now I've eaten a few smoked balogna logs which look pretty
    grostesque when done and we used to have Spam Smackdowns in college,
    but I'm hesitant on the pork roll.
     
  14. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Stark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:270220050733184903%[email protected]

    > It's a Taylor Pork Roll and it's available here in Memphis alongside
    > all the Boar's Head products. I'm tempted. But the "acquired taste" bit
    > bothers me. Now I've eaten a few smoked balogna logs which look pretty
    > grostesque when done and we used to have Spam Smackdowns in college,
    > but I'm hesitant on the pork roll.


    When it was said that it's an acquired taste, I think it was because people
    who grew up with it seem to crave it when they leave the area. So you
    figure, this stuff must be great! Then they try it and don't see what the
    big
    deal is. It's not something to be scared of. Try it once just for a joke,
    to
    see what people are talking about, then take it or leave it.

    nancy
     
  15. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 13:34:13 GMT, Stark <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, this one
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Curly Sue wrote:
    >>
    >> > On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 20:31:59 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    >> > wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about his
    >> >>family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty is a
    >> >>porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made, but I
    >> >>am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of the
    >> >>sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?
    >> >
    >> > The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    >> > Spam.

    >>
    >> Not really like Spam. Back in the 50's in my parents' South River, New
    >> Jersey resto, we served it sliced and fried with any of several other
    >> fixings. We called it "Taylor Ham" I guess because everybody else did.
    >> Sliced off a slab about 1/4 inch thick and cut four radial slits in it
    >> so it wouldn't "cup" while cooking. On a roll with other stuff.
    >>
    >> Pastorio
    >>

    >It's a Taylor Pork Roll and it's available here in Memphis alongside
    >all the Boar's Head products. I'm tempted. But the "acquired taste" bit
    >bothers me. Now I've eaten a few smoked balogna logs which look pretty
    >grostesque when done and we used to have Spam Smackdowns in college,
    >but I'm hesitant on the pork roll.


    It's not disgusting or terribly expensive. So go ahead and try it if
    it's right there and you're curious. But it's not worth longing after
    or sending away for. My intention is really just to provide a
    balanced view of the stuff.

    Let me explain my "acquired taste" phrase. It's one of those
    regional foods that one hears a lot about here and you feel like
    you're missing out if you don't try it. So when I lived in Trenton
    another non-NJ friend and I bought some. We tried it as suggested and
    were shocked at how ...uninteresting it is and how out-of-proportion
    its press. I was looking at it the wrong way- I thought it was
    something that one added to an egg-and cheese sandwich that would
    punch it up a bit, like bacon would. In fact, the egg, cheese, and
    bread are there to make the TPR interesting.

    So in searching for a justification for its continued existence in a
    global world of good food and affluence, the only thing we could come
    up with was that it was something people retained an affection for
    because they grew up with it.

    I'm going to stop there because I can sense the daggers pointed my way
    from NJ. ;>

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  16. TINY

    TINY Guest

    I like it and even eat some of it raw while the other cooks
    "Curly Sue" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 13:34:13 GMT, Stark <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, this one
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Curly Sue wrote:
    >>>
    >>> > On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 20:31:59 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]>
    >>> > wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >>I am reading a book called "Luncheonette" by Steven Sorrentino about
    >>> >>his
    >>> >>family's diner in West Long Branch, New Jersey. The diner's specialty
    >>> >>is a
    >>> >>porkroll-egg-cheese sandwich. He pretty well describes how it is made,
    >>> >>but I
    >>> >>am not clear the type of meat that is used for the "porkroll" part of
    >>> >>the
    >>> >>sandwich. Anyone have any ideas?
    >>> >
    >>> > The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    >>> > Spam.
    >>>
    >>> Not really like Spam. Back in the 50's in my parents' South River, New
    >>> Jersey resto, we served it sliced and fried with any of several other
    >>> fixings. We called it "Taylor Ham" I guess because everybody else did.
    >>> Sliced off a slab about 1/4 inch thick and cut four radial slits in it
    >>> so it wouldn't "cup" while cooking. On a roll with other stuff.
    >>>
    >>> Pastorio
    >>>

    >>It's a Taylor Pork Roll and it's available here in Memphis alongside
    >>all the Boar's Head products. I'm tempted. But the "acquired taste" bit
    >>bothers me. Now I've eaten a few smoked balogna logs which look pretty
    >>grostesque when done and we used to have Spam Smackdowns in college,
    >>but I'm hesitant on the pork roll.

    >
    > It's not disgusting or terribly expensive. So go ahead and try it if
    > it's right there and you're curious. But it's not worth longing after
    > or sending away for. My intention is really just to provide a
    > balanced view of the stuff.
    >
    > Let me explain my "acquired taste" phrase. It's one of those
    > regional foods that one hears a lot about here and you feel like
    > you're missing out if you don't try it. So when I lived in Trenton
    > another non-NJ friend and I bought some. We tried it as suggested and
    > were shocked at how ...uninteresting it is and how out-of-proportion
    > its press. I was looking at it the wrong way- I thought it was
    > something that one added to an egg-and cheese sandwich that would
    > punch it up a bit, like bacon would. In fact, the egg, cheese, and
    > bread are there to make the TPR interesting.
    >
    > So in searching for a justification for its continued existence in a
    > global world of good food and affluence, the only thing we could come
    > up with was that it was something people retained an affection for
    > because they grew up with it.
    >
    > I'm going to stop there because I can sense the daggers pointed my way
    > from NJ. ;>
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  17. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    > Dog3 <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz>, if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    >>I've used Emeril's recipe to do an entire Bologna recipe. It was good.
    >>Spam is another issue. I just do not like it. Not sure I would like the
    >>pork roll either.

    >
    > I don't like Spam either, Michael. But I like Taylor Pork Roll, which I
    > refer to as upscale Spam. TPR is firmer and less fatty than Spam.
    >
    >>Michael <- willing to try anything once

    >
    > It's definitely worth a try. BTW, when I've cooked TPR, it's never made
    > it
    > to the Kaiser roll and cheese, as Nancy said it should be served. I just
    > eat it plain. If they sold it in this neck of the woods, would I buy it?
    > You betcha!
    >
    > Carol


    Hrm...Interesting. I happen to like fried spam sammiches but I'm not real
    fond of bologna. I guess it is a matter of personal taste. I've never had
    TPR but I'll try anything once. Twice if I was drinking the first time!
    ;->

    Now, to find a place here in the panhandle of Nebraska that sells it.
    Safeway or wallyworld. I know there are net sites that sell food but I've
    never purchased perishable foods over the net before so am kind of leery.
    Any opinions here are very welcome.

    Bret



    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
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  18. Stark

    Stark Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Curly Sue
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 13:34:13 GMT, Stark <[email protected]> wrote:
    >


    > >It's a Taylor Pork Roll and it's available here in Memphis alongside
    > >all the Boar's Head products. I'm tempted. But the "acquired taste" bit
    > >bothers me. Now I've eaten a few smoked balogna logs which look pretty
    > >grostesque when done and we used to have Spam Smackdowns in college,
    > >but I'm hesitant on the pork roll.

    >
    > It's not disgusting or terribly expensive. So go ahead and try it if
    > it's right there and you're curious. But it's not worth longing after
    > or sending away for. My intention is really just to provide a
    > balanced view of the stuff.
    >


    Point taken. Tks.
     
  19. MaryMind

    MaryMind Guest

    Dog3 wrote:
    > "limey" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >>"Dog3" wrote in message >
    >> (Curly Sue) wrote >>
    >>
    >>>>The NJ pork roll is an acquired taste. It's similar in concept to
    >>>>Spam.
    >>>>
    >>>>Disclaimer: I am one of the people who never acquired a taste for
    >>>>the stuff. :>
    >>>>
    >>>>Sue(tm)
    >>>
    >>>IMO spam is gross. I have little tolerance for the convenience meats.
    >>>Well
    >>>except for the ham salad, spread, whatever you call it. Potted meat
    >>>is an abomination but I love Vienna Sausages ;) When mother was
    >>>pregnant with my kid brother (I was 18 years old) she ate something
    >>>picked. They were nasty
    >>>looking.
    >>>
    >>>Michael

    >>
    >>TPR isn't like Spam, Michael. It's like - well - just like Taylor
    >>Pork Roll. I suppose it's something you either like or you don't.
    >>
    >>Dora

    >
    >
    > Actually, I've never had it. I don't recall seeing it on the shelves. I
    > like strange stuff, maybe I would like it.
    >
    > Michael
    >

    Michael,
    You'll find it in the fresh meat case or near the bacon and breakfast
    sausages.
     
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