Portland gets it's own bike...

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Preston Crawford, Jan 11, 2006.



  1. Darin McGrew

    Darin McGrew Guest

  2. On 2006-01-12, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Preston Crawford wrote:
    >> http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike.php?bikeid=1037000&f=7
    >>
    >> :)

    >
    > Yes, there's been considerable discussion of that bike already.
    >
    > It's a bike named after one of the rainiest cities in America, and it's
    > got token fenders. Bad idea.
    >
    > - Frank Krygowski
    >


    I just saw it and haven't followed the group lately, sorry. I just
    thought it was interesting that they'd think of us. :)

    Even if they didn't get it quite right. They got some stuff right it
    seems. Wouldn't disc brakes be a good idea, given how Portland is
    notorious for bikes having rims get destroyed because of the grit?

    Also upright geometry but road handles... that's kind of in the Portland
    spirit.

    What isn't (aside from the fenders) is the price. $1500 is kind of
    "ouch" when the purpose of a "Portland" bike will be to run it into the
    ground in the rainy season.

    Preston
     
  3. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Preston Crawford wrote:
    > http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike.php?bikeid=1037000&f=7
    >
    > :)

    Yes, thats been around for at least a little while now, I ran across one
    in a parking lot a few months ago and checked the TREK website and found
    it. Seems like it a common practice to name bikes after locations.
    Barcroft makes the "Virginia", but thats a recumbent.
    http://www.barcroftcycles.com/bikes.html

    Also the "Columbia" and the "Dakota"

    Ken
    --
    Quit? You know, once I was thinking of quitting when I was diagnosed
    with brain, lung and testicular cancer all at the same time. But with
    the love and support of my friends and family, I got back on the bike
    and won the Tour de France five times in a row. But I'm sure you have a
    good reason to quit. So what are you dying of that's keeping you from
    the finals? - Lance Armstrong in "Dodgeball - A true underdog story"

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  4. Ken M wrote:
    > Preston Crawford wrote:
    > > http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike.php?bikeid=1037000&f=7
    > >
    > > :)

    > Yes, thats been around for at least a little while now, I ran across one
    > in a parking lot a few months ago and checked the TREK website and found
    > it. Seems like it a common practice to name bikes after locations.
    > Barcroft makes the "Virginia", but thats a recumbent.


    Hmm. They must have been thinking of eastern Virginia, not the
    Appalachian part.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    ([email protected]) wrote:
    >
    > Ken M wrote:
    > > Preston Crawford wrote:
    > > > http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike.php?bikeid=1037000&f=7
    > > >
    > > > :)

    > > Yes, thats been around for at least a little while now, I ran across one
    > > in a parking lot a few months ago and checked the TREK website and found
    > > it. Seems like it a common practice to name bikes after locations.
    > > Barcroft makes the "Virginia", but thats a recumbent.

    >
    > Hmm. They must have been thinking of eastern Virginia, not the
    > Appalachian part.


    They're located in Falls Church.

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Life - loathe it or ignore it, you can't like it.
     
  6. Ben Pfaff

    Ben Pfaff Guest

  7. In article <[email protected]>, Ben Pfaff
    ([email protected]) wrote:
    > Ken M <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > >Seems like it a common practice to name bikes after locations.
    > > Barcroft makes the "Virginia", but thats a recumbent.
    > > http://www.barcroftcycles.com/bikes.html
    > >
    > > Also the "Columbia" and the "Dakota"

    >
    > Lemond makes the "Zurich", "Buenos Aires", "Reno", "Nevada City",
    > and some others that might be locations that I don't recognize.


    Versailles, Fillmore, Sarthe, Croix de Fer, Tourmalet, Alpe d'Huez,
    Chambery, Rennes & Limoges too.

    Claud Butler used to have a range of mountain bikes sharing their model
    names with assorted sports cars. The problem being that on liberating
    the moniker of Maserati's Kyalami (named in turn for the South African
    motor racing circuit), they spelled it wrong...

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    This Unit is a productive Unit.
     
  8. Bill H.

    Bill H. Guest

    Yeah, it's kind of a gimmick, I suppose, but the name at least has more
    personality than the Trek 1000. From a marketing standpoint, creating
    a bike called the "Portland" with disc brakes and fenders might help it
    stand out in customers minds when they go shopping for bikes. A tad
    pricey, though, for a bike that's presumably going to be ridden
    frequently in wet weather.
     
  9. > It's a bike named after one of the rainiest cities in America, and it's
    > got token fenders. Bad idea.
    >
    > - Frank Krygowski


    It's a tough one; the serious commuter is pretty darned specific about
    his/her requirements, and I'll bet whatever standard fender they used would
    generate nearly as much discussion as the "token" (easily-removed) fenders
    that are on the bike.

    But after bringing a bunch into the store and playing with them, there's
    really nothing about the bike that precludes doing just about anything
    anyone wants with it. Standard fittings, even has fender mounts on the
    carbon fiber fork. The rear disc has been moved to the inside of the rear
    triangle so as not to interfere with racks or fenders.

    The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have been the
    silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the big thing
    these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the bike has
    asked about them.

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Preston Crawford wrote:
    >> http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike.php?bikeid=1037000&f=7
    >>
    >> :)

    >
    > Yes, there's been considerable discussion of that bike already.
    >
    > It's a bike named after one of the rainiest cities in America, and it's
    > got token fenders. Bad idea.
    >
    > - Frank Krygowski
    >
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > It's a bike named after one of the rainiest cities in America, and it's
    > > got token fenders. Bad idea.
    > >
    > > - Frank Krygowski

    >
    > It's a tough one; the serious commuter is pretty darned specific about
    > his/her requirements, and I'll bet whatever standard fender they used would
    > generate nearly as much discussion as the "token" (easily-removed) fenders
    > that are on the bike.
    >
    > But after bringing a bunch into the store and playing with them, there's
    > really nothing about the bike that precludes doing just about anything
    > anyone wants with it. Standard fittings, even has fender mounts on the
    > carbon fiber fork. The rear disc has been moved to the inside of the rear
    > triangle so as not to interfere with racks or fenders.
    >
    > The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have been the
    > silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the big thing
    > these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the bike has
    > asked about them.


    They're nice when you want to sit up in traffic, for reasons ranging
    from better visiblity to easier bunny-hopping preparation, but still
    want access to the brakes.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
    "I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
    to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
     
  11. >> The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have been
    >> the
    >> silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the big
    >> thing
    >> these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the bike
    >> has
    >> asked about them.

    >
    > They're nice when you want to sit up in traffic, for reasons ranging
    > from better visiblity to easier bunny-hopping preparation, but still
    > want access to the brakes.


    But please, keep in mind you should really have a pretty wide bar to use
    them. When you're in traffic may not be a good time to be in a position on
    your bike where you don't have a lot of control, and braking from a position
    where your hands are very close together doesn't seem like a good thing.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> > It's a bike named after one of the rainiest cities in America, and it's
    >> > got token fenders. Bad idea.
    >> >
    >> > - Frank Krygowski

    >>
    >> It's a tough one; the serious commuter is pretty darned specific about
    >> his/her requirements, and I'll bet whatever standard fender they used
    >> would
    >> generate nearly as much discussion as the "token" (easily-removed)
    >> fenders
    >> that are on the bike.
    >>
    >> But after bringing a bunch into the store and playing with them, there's
    >> really nothing about the bike that precludes doing just about anything
    >> anyone wants with it. Standard fittings, even has fender mounts on the
    >> carbon fiber fork. The rear disc has been moved to the inside of the rear
    >> triangle so as not to interfere with racks or fenders.
    >>
    >> The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have been
    >> the
    >> silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the big
    >> thing
    >> these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the bike
    >> has
    >> asked about them.

    >
    > They're nice when you want to sit up in traffic, for reasons ranging
    > from better visiblity to easier bunny-hopping preparation, but still
    > want access to the brakes.
    >
    > --
    > Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
    > "I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
    > to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >> The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have been
    > >> the
    > >> silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the big
    > >> thing
    > >> these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the bike
    > >> has
    > >> asked about them.

    > >
    > > They're nice when you want to sit up in traffic, for reasons ranging
    > > from better visiblity to easier bunny-hopping preparation, but still
    > > want access to the brakes.

    >
    > But please, keep in mind you should really have a pretty wide bar to use
    > them. When you're in traffic may not be a good time to be in a position on
    > your bike where you don't have a lot of control, and braking from a position
    > where your hands are very close together doesn't seem like a good thing.


    1) Having a wide bar is not a problem (my own are mounted on a 44, which
    is somewhere between silly-wide and maximally wide for a rider like me).

    2) Your hands are close together, but no closer than on a narrow XC bar,
    admittedly a setup that has fallen out of favour except with serious
    racers. Very close togther? Not so much as to cause stability issues.
    The trick is to have both hands on the bar :).

    3) Their original purpose was to give an XC-style position to 'crossers
    (or, if you will, to make the top tube hand position usable) for
    technical terrain. That's not to say they're a universal choice. I know
    some very successful local 'crossers who don't run 'em at all, and I
    rode last season without them either, though it should be noted that I
    did the last cyclocross season on my road bike, so I'm just crazy all
    around.

    My suspicion is that they make a lot more sense when cutting it up on
    technical, near-mountain-bike courses like you occasionally see on this
    continent, rather than the generally fast and less mountain-bike courses
    that are traditional 'cross terrain. But I have been commuting on them
    for a few days, and I like it so far. We'll see.

    Note that the difference in hand position width from the hoods to the
    drops is inches (2?) at most.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
    "I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
    to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
     
  13. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky <[email protected]> wrote:
    :>>> The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have
    :>>> been the
    :>>> silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the
    :>>> big thing
    :>>> these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the
    :>>> bike has
    :>>> asked about them.
    :>>
    :>> They're nice when you want to sit up in traffic, for reasons ranging
    :>> from better visiblity to easier bunny-hopping preparation, but still
    :>> want access to the brakes.
    :>
    :> But please, keep in mind you should really have a pretty wide bar to
    :> use them. When you're in traffic may not be a good time to be in a
    :> position on your bike where you don't have a lot of control, and
    :> braking from a position where your hands are very close together
    :> doesn't seem like a good thing.

    My bike (Specialized Sequoia Expert) has those silly extra break levels. I
    don't think my bars are particularly wide, but i have no problems controling
    the bike with my hands in position to use those levels. Of course, I'm not
    a pro-level rider either, so .....
    I like the extra levels but I do feel sometimes that the limit my options
    and my hand positions.
     
  14. On 2006-01-12, Mike Jacoubowsky <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have been the
    > silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the big thing
    > these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the bike has
    > asked about them.


    Silly? I have them. I like them for being able to switch hand positions
    quite liberally.

    Maybe that's just me...

    Preston
     
  15. On 2006-01-13, Mike Jacoubowsky <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> The only thing I'm thinking that might have been added would have been
    >>> the
    >>> silly "extra" cross-style brake levers. Seems that those are the big
    >>> thing
    >>> these days, and several of the customers who have been eyeing the bike
    >>> has
    >>> asked about them.

    >>
    >> They're nice when you want to sit up in traffic, for reasons ranging
    >> from better visiblity to easier bunny-hopping preparation, but still
    >> want access to the brakes.

    >
    > But please, keep in mind you should really have a pretty wide bar to use
    > them. When you're in traffic may not be a good time to be in a position on
    > your bike where you don't have a lot of control, and braking from a position
    > where your hands are very close together doesn't seem like a good thing.


    I agree with this. I happen to have very wide handlebars because I have
    very wide shoulders. So they work perfect for me. I STILL have room for
    a light and a computer and space to spare for one of those goofy horns
    if I ever really turn into a Fred.

    Preston
     
  16. On 2006-01-12, Bill H. <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Yeah, it's kind of a gimmick, I suppose, but the name at least has more
    > personality than the Trek 1000. From a marketing standpoint, creating
    > a bike called the "Portland" with disc brakes and fenders might help it
    > stand out in customers minds when they go shopping for bikes. A tad
    > pricey, though, for a bike that's presumably going to be ridden
    > frequently in wet weather.
    >


    Yeah, that was my first thought. If you survey the landscape of Portland
    cyclists that commute in the winter, not many are riding $300 bikes,
    much less $1500 bikes. Most are riding beaters that they've fixed up to
    be servicable until spring comes.

    Preston
     
  17. Steve knight

    Steve knight Guest


    >Yeah, that was my first thought. If you survey the landscape of Portland
    >cyclists that commute in the winter, not many are riding $300 bikes,
    >much less $1500 bikes. Most are riding beaters that they've fixed up to
    >be servicable until spring comes.


    I ride a 2200 bent. what's the problem we don't have salt on the road
    just water. and right now some sand that's wearing my disc brake pads.
    I want a nice bike to ride. if I had to have a crappy bike in the rain
    thats about all I would get to ride right now (G)
    Knight-Toolworks
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com
    affordable handmade wooden planes
     
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