Posers.....I'm expecting to get bashed...

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Mad-One, Jul 17, 2006.

  1. Mad-One

    Mad-One New Member

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    I have been running for quite awhile and decided to add cycling to my fitness routine. I looked at quite a few bikes, from $1200 on up, did a lot of research, and after riding quite a few bikes I went with a Trek Carbon. It did have the best feel for me, and I rode quite a few others and wasn't even looking at Trek. I'm 5'5" and 137lbs, and weight was a very important factor for me. I used to race MTB's and light equipment made a tremendous difference and played a large factor in my road bike decision.

    I wound up looking at quite a few frames, with the various levels of components and got a deal on something while much higher price than originally planned, I'm quite happy with. I don't see the need to upgrade later and have a bunch of stuff lying about, so I went whole hog. I'm fully expecting to be labeled more for the bike than anything, but I really could care less of what people think.

    My real questions are.....how long should an average beginner take to improve? My first ride was a hair over 20 miles and it took me an hour and 18 mins. I live in North Ft Worth and the wind played a larget factor. My avg was 15.8 mph. I took no breaks or stops. Would that be considered a decent start?

    How long until the sit bones get used to riding? Near the end of the 20 miles, I was beat and could barely sit, but I'm planning on another 20 tomorrow and then Wed my LBS has a ride for everyone that I plan on doing.

    What tips or methods should I need, beyond the obvious more seat time....

    Thanks,

    Mad-One.
     
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  2. graf zeppelin

    graf zeppelin New Member

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    Welcome to the sport. Ride a lot and frankly, the difference between posers and those who bash them is minimal. They're two sides of the same coin and pretty much each are a detriment. My opinion is ride for the love of riding and ride what you can afford, justify and makes you happy. Dont worry about either and be happy to know that the majority of the cycling community is above that needless posing or mudslinging. You can ride a high end bike and not be a poser; you can ride a lower end bike and be better fit than someone on a high end bike without the need to give them a hard time.

    Its a lot of saddle time to get those early base miles in. That alone will probably now carry you through the rest of this season I'd think. Just ride and enjoy it. Get a trainer for the off season and you can advance your cycling at that time perhaps with a HRM (use it for running too, if you arent already) and a more focused cycling training routine to hit next spring in good shape.

    You could start simple with a basic stepped routine and need only a basic cycle computer. Starting with 20 miles as a ride distance is fine. Ride at the speed and cadence over that distance that causes you quite a good deal of perceived effort 1-2 times a week (not so hard that its a challenge for you to finish), and ride the same distance at a middle range effort 1-2 times a week. Let the other 1-2 rides on the week be at a lighter effort. For the two harder rides on the week, try aiming at either 18 mph average or 100+ avg cadence, or both. You may not be able to sustain it the entire 20 miles right off the bat I'd bet, but for short intervals you could, up until the point that you can do it over the whole 20 miles. When you hit that point, up the miles to around 30 for the harder effort rides (your avg speed and cadence will now drop again until you can handle the longer distance) and adjust your lighter rides to 25 miles or so etc.

    This is so terribly general, but it gives you a super rough idea. Be sure to have a day off or two in there each week, as well as that light day or two each week. Basically, the bottom line is as you said, ride ride ride. Eventually some sort of above loose plan of slowly extending milage, speed and cadence wont be enough to really train you to any degree and you'll need to read something like "The Cyclist's Training Bible" by Joe Friel in order to figure out how to better focus training and riding. Goes way beyond what I would try to summarize here, and beyond what I'd really suggest for someone starting out brand new on a bike.

    Enjoy your riding. Give it a month or so and maybe check out Joe Friel's book, read up on things in the Training forum here, do some research on HRMs etc and most of all - have fun. :D
     
  3. cheapie

    cheapie New Member

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    make sure you don't scrimp on your shorts. that will really make a difference.

    btw, which trek did you buy. i love my 5200!
     
  4. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    Actually, nobody here would have even thought of you as a poser if you had spent less time describing your bike than asking your question. ;)

    Your first ride exceeded mine by 19 miles and 10 mph... so you will be fine.

    It sounds like you are dedicated enough to see improvements pretty quickly, probably in the first couple of weeks. However for the best advice, I would suggest that you ask in the forum specifically for training to get some ideas about getting in condition as quickly as possible.

    As long as you rest your sit bones, they will start being able to take the longer rides pretty quickly as well.

    In a nutshell... To improve you need to consider a variety of issues that includes nutrition and hydration along with:

    1) rides for distance (base miles)

    2) rides for speed (intervals etc)

    3) rest/recovery rides (or days off)

    All of these are important to improving your performance.

    It is probably similar to what you do running, so not a huge leap in theory, just a difference in execution.

    EDIT: On the seat issue, if you dont' see quick improvement, especially if you get shorts as someone else suggested... you may need to try a different saddle.
     
  5. Mad-One

    Mad-One New Member

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    I picked up a 50cm '05 Madone SL 5.9. It was so much noticeably smoother than anything else I rode and priced $2K less than a new one, which compared to other carbon framed bikes with decent components & wheels made me pull the trigger. I looked at the 5200 and would have went that route, but my size wasn't available, so we worked something out.
     
  6. Mad-One

    Mad-One New Member

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    Thanks for the advice dgregory57, its just a completely different arena with the gear and everything. Running is more simple to me and more comfortable I guess since I've been doing it longer. I am smart enough to know that advice from other cyclists is something to pay attention too.
     
  7. IcemanYQQ

    IcemanYQQ New Member

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    When you can ride 24 miles in less than an hour :) All kidding aside, I used to be able to do that, I can't anymore, I still have the same bike, but it does not make me a poser. You will be fine.

    As for the shorts, don't skimp on the cost. This is one of the very few areas in life where you pay for quality. The last thing you want is things down there going to sleep :)

    I would love to read a definition of "poser". To me, it is someone that has a very high end bike, never rides, shows up at races, always making excuses for this and that. I don't care if you can't average more than 12mph, if you are out there trying, that's all that matters. A great bike is nice to have, and everyone is entitled to own. Just don't use it as a decoration.
     
  8. Madd Dogg

    Madd Dogg New Member

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    I know that I won't be popular here but I didn't consider myself a cyclist until I completed my first century, it was a cool Breeze (http://www.cibike.org/page5.html ) one month after buying a bike (Seven Alaris) during the century I realized where I need to improve and what upgrades my bike needed.
     
  9. Mad-One

    Mad-One New Member

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    This morning I beat my last time by just over 8 minutes and didn't feel near as wiped out as last time over the 20 miles. I did have a banana and some juice before heading out though and feel I learned a few things this time out. I covered the 20 miles in 1hr and 10mins, vs Sunday's time of 1hr 18mins. Had I not needed to get back to get some work done, I feel I had another 5 miles in me, but I see no reason to push yet and will keep trying to improve my feel for riding and then add some distance. Hopefully, thats the right path to take.
     
  10. ohgodnooo!

    ohgodnooo! New Member

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    Do some evenly paced rides where your not trying to beat your previous time. Riding faster is not always beneficial as you can run yourself into the ground.
    If you race mountain bikes you should already realize that the body needs base miles, intervals, recovery along with time off the bike to improve conditioning. Take some time to just pedal along and look at the world from a bike-centric point of view. You road guys are always hammer, hammer, hammer.
    Posers? I wish posers rode in my area, hell anyone.
     
  11. Mad-One

    Mad-One New Member

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    Thanks! I actually took a leisurely ride over the weekend and found it beneficial.
     
  12. snaps10

    snaps10 New Member

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    pick up this months issue of bicycling magazine. there is a training regimine in there for riding a century in only 4 weeks. i usually skip those articles, but had ample time for the reading (we had mexican for dinner) the plan is actually a decent plan. it gives plenty of time for recovery (this is important) and doesn't require alot of time (1-1.5 hrs 3 times a week, with a 3-5 hr ride on the weekend) i really think it would be a great way to build the base miles, and it outlines what efforts need to be done.
     
  13. aacliment

    aacliment New Member

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    Those training plans are actually quite usefull. If you go to bicycling magazine's website www.bicycling.com you can also find other great tips on nutrition and diet as well as skills and other cool stuff. If you are relly serious you can check out the personal coach section where you can get a cycling coach to guide you through your training based on your goals. You can also check out carmicheal training systems ( lance's coach) for online training coaches.

    The LBS organized group ride will also give you a whole lot of resources in the way of info through the more experienced riders you will meet.

    Have a great time!
     
  14. Mad-One

    Mad-One New Member

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    Thanks Everyone.....This is a great site and the info will be taken and used.
     
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