Positron cable

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Lindsay Rowland, May 13, 2003.

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  1. Does anyone know of a source for a Shimano Positron derailleur cable? It's a push-pull type, ie,
    single strand of piano-type-wire. I'm guessing that this stuff is over 20 years old - very retro.
    Other than the cable the system works amazingly well and it would be a pity to discard it for the
    sake of a cable.

    Thanks for any help.

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
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  2. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Lindsay Rowlands <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Does anyone know of a source for a Shimano Positron derailleur cable? It's a push-pull type, ie,
    > single strand of piano-type-wire. I'm guessing that this stuff is over 20 years old - very retro.
    > Other than the cable the system works amazingly well and it would be a pity to discard it for the
    > sake of a cable.
    >
    > Thanks for any help.
    >
    > Cheerz, Lynzz

    sorry if im being a dork for lobbing thigns i dont know about, but if you cant find anything, piano
    wire in your material of choice is easily and widely available. it would beat discarding it for the
    sake of a cable, as you say.

    anthony
     
  3. Lindsay Rowlands <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Does anyone know of a source for a Shimano Positron derailleur cable? It's a push-pull type, ie,
    > single strand of piano-type-wire. I'm guessing that this stuff is over 20 years old - very retro.
    > Other than the cable the system works amazingly well and it would be a pity to discard it for the
    > sake of a cable.

    I've never seen a Positron drivetrain work "amazingly well" or even "adequately well" for
    that matter.

    If you are happy with your Positron gears Loose Screws lists this cable for $9.95
    http://www.loosescrews.com/ search on Positron.

    Bruce
    --
    Bruce Jackson - Sr. Systems Programmer - DMSP, a M/A/R/C Group comapny
     
  4. Ajames54

    Ajames54 Guest

    On 14 May 2003 08:22:01 -0700, [email protected] (Bruce Jackson) wrote:

    >Lindsay Rowlands <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> Does anyone know of a source for a Shimano Positron derailleur cable? It's a push-pull type, ie,
    >> single strand of piano-type-wire. I'm guessing that this stuff is over 20 years old - very retro.
    >> Other than the cable the system works amazingly well and it would be a pity to discard it for the
    >> sake of a cable.
    >
    >I've never seen a Positron drivetrain work "amazingly well" or even "adequately well" for
    >that matter.
    >
    >If you are happy with your Positron gears Loose Screws lists this cable for $9.95
    >http://www.loosescrews.com/ search on Positron.
    >
    >Bruce

    They would be closer to thirty... for the time they worked OK... better by far than the other low
    end stuff of the time...
     
  5. ajames54 <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > for the time [Positron drivetrains] they worked OK... better by far than the other low end stuff
    > of the time...

    Wasn't the Shimano Eagle rear derailleur contemporary with Positron? The Eagle was an excellent gear
    changer; far better than Positron. The Eagle didn't index but I'd far prefer a working friction
    drivetrain than a non-working index one.

    Speaking of the Eagle, this brings up a bike shop story.

    I was working at a bike shop that mostly sold cheap used bicycles to college students who couldn't
    afford a car. We had hundreds of junker bikes and the goal was to produce as many working bicycles
    out of the junk bikes as possible. Everything worked on the bikes we built though they were often
    Frankenbikes with mismatched brake levers, derailleurs, etc. We sold the used bicycles for $30-$40
    each. 15 years later strolling the campus I saw some of the bicycles I built in bike racks; by then
    they probably had at least 3 owners since I built them up.

    There were parts that I dreaded seeing on the junker bikes. Shimano Positron and Front Freewheel
    were both trouble. There were also the plastic Simplex gear changers that time had rendered brittle
    enough that they usually broke with the first serious tug. One thing that was never trouble though
    was the Shimano Eagle rear derailleur. Even badly mangled Eagles could usually be made workable with
    a little cold setting with channel lock pliars. Worst case we could install a new Eagle derailleur
    for a few bucks and be done with it. The Eagle was a derailleur that never let us down.

    After tuition went up there were fewer poor college students. As the market for cheap ugly used
    bicycles dwindled we started to carry more enthusiast oriented bikes and parts. We hired a Salesman
    who raced and he managed to resurrect a defunct local race team. After a season of being "off the
    back" I got faster and started racing. Talking with other racers the subject of bike parts came up
    and everyone started to talk about their favorite bike part. One person loved his Mavic hubs,
    another went on about his Bullseye derailleur pullies, etc. When it came to me I said that my
    favorite bike part was the Shimano Eagle rear deraillerur. Everyone was aghast. I had a Campy Super
    Record Cinelli and my favorite bike part was the Shimano Eagle rear derailleur? I explained how as a
    mechanic I admired that it was cheap enough for any bike yet nearly indestructible. I was dared to
    ride one on the next training ride.

    With my Cinelli in the stand and a Shimano Eagle rear deralleur still in the bag in my hand I wasn't
    sure if what I was doing was rape or weird science. I tore open the bag as I had done hundreds of
    times in the past and put the cheap derailleur on my prized steed. The ride went well; the Shimano
    Eagle shifted every bit as good as my Campy Super Record; perhaps even a tad better. The cheap
    changer probably added a quarter pound to my bike and likely wouldn't hold up very long being ridden
    5-10K miles/year but to me it proved its metal that day.

    Bruce
    --
    Bruce Jackson - Sr. Systems Programmer - DMSP, a M/A/R/C Group company
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, Bruce Jackson wrote:

    > ajames54 <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> for the time [Positron drivetrains] they worked OK... better by far than the other low end stuff
    >> of the time...

    > Wasn't the Shimano Eagle rear derailleur contemporary with Positron?

    No. The Positron derailleur had actual indents on the derailleur itself to do the indexing.

    > The Eagle was an excellent gear changer; far better than Positron.

    The basic design of the Positron was essentially the same as the Eagle but with the indexing
    modifications.

    > One thing that was never trouble though was the Shimano Eagle rear derailleur. Even badly mangled
    > Eagles could usually be made workable with a little cold setting with channel lock pliars. Worst
    > case we could install a new Eagle derailleur for a few bucks and be done with it. The Eagle was a
    > derailleur that never let us down.

    They're heavy dogs, though. My favorite was the "Titalist" which was identical to the "Crane" (later
    "Dura-Ace") but with more steel parts. Shifted like a dream and never wore out.

    --

    -John ([email protected])
     
  7. Paul Giroux

    Paul Giroux Guest

    I thought Loose Screws/Third Hand went out of business...

    > If you are happy with your Positron gears Loose Screws lists this cable for $9.95
    > http://www.loosescrews.com/ search on Positron.
     
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