Possible good to come of the crash yesterday

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Joe Hurley, Jul 15, 2003.

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  1. Joe Hurley

    Joe Hurley Guest

    In the spirit of every cloud having a silver lining, I propose the following:

    Perhaps in the wake of yesterday's crash, le Societe Tour de France in the future should scout out
    roads to be used for future routes of the Tour and either avoid those that are paved with this sort
    of chip & seal job or tell the municipality either you repave these roads with some decent pavement,
    or we move the tour somewhere else and you lose all the revenue of all those people who come to
    watch the tour.

    Municipalities are at fault for this more than anything else. I grew up in New England, and they
    used to do this sort of thing to "repave" roads. They call it "oiling" the road -- they would put
    down a layer of gravel and then a thin layer of tar, similar to driveway sealant, to adhere to the
    gravel and make a road surface. I remember when my dad and I used to bike, we would avoid such roads
    in the summer because we found they were "sticky." It's a cheap way of paving a road rather than
    using real asphalt. Not a big problem with the wide tires of automobiles or even motorcycles, but
    with the 2-inch wide tires of bicycles, there's much less margin for error.

    I know it's a hassle to close down major highways, but maybe they should think of using more major
    roads, which are likely to be paved better, or else put a stipulation such as that I outline above
    in the future.

    Just a thought.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
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  2. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    Joe Hurley <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In the spirit of every cloud having a silver lining, I propose the following:

    > Perhaps in the wake of yesterday's crash, le Societe Tour de France in the future should scout out
    > roads to be used for future routes of the Tour and either avoid those that are paved with this
    > sort of chip & seal job or tell the municipality either you repave these roads with some decent
    > pavement, or we move the tour somewhere else and you lose all the revenue of all those people who
    > come to watch the tour.

    That's how they pave most mountain roads, on both sides of the Atlantic. You want the highways? Lose
    the cols. While we're at it, let's properly pave or alter Paris-Roubaix... Let's not race on rainy
    days where the road is slick.

    > Municipalities are at fault for this more than anything else. I grew up in New England, and they
    > used to do this sort of thing to "repave" roads. They call it "oiling" the road -- they would put
    > down a layer of gravel and then a thin layer of tar, similar to driveway sealant, to adhere to the
    > gravel and make a road surface. I remember when my dad and I used to bike, we would avoid such
    > roads in the summer because we found they were "sticky." It's a cheap way of paving a road rather
    > than using real asphalt. Not a big problem with the wide tires of automobiles or even motorcycles,
    > but with the 2-inch wide tires of bicycles, there's much less margin for error.

    > I know it's a hassle to close down major highways, but maybe they should think of using more major
    > roads, which are likely to be paved better, or else put a stipulation such as that I outline above
    > in the future.

    > Just a thought.

    > Regards,

    > Joe
     
  3. Tc Rider

    Tc Rider Guest

    "Joe Hurley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In the spirit of every cloud having a silver lining, I propose the following:
    >
    > Perhaps in the wake of yesterday's crash, le Societe Tour de France in the future should scout out
    > roads to be used for future routes of the Tour and either avoid those that are paved with this
    > sort of chip & seal job or tell the municipality either you repave these roads with some decent
    > pavement, or we move the tour somewhere else and you lose all the revenue of all those people who
    > come to watch the tour.
    >
    > Municipalities are at fault for this more than anything else. I grew up in New England, and they
    > used to do this sort of thing to "repave" roads. They call it "oiling" the road -- they would put
    > down a layer of gravel and then a thin layer of tar, similar to driveway sealant, to adhere to the
    > gravel and make a road surface. I remember when my dad and I used to bike, we would avoid such
    > roads in the summer because we found they were "sticky." It's a cheap way of paving a road rather
    > than using real asphalt. Not a big problem with the wide tires of automobiles or even motorcycles,
    > but with the 2-inch wide tires of bicycles, there's much less margin for error.
    >
    > I know it's a hassle to close down major highways, but maybe they should think of using more major
    > roads, which are likely to be paved better, or else put a stipulation such as that I outline above
    > in the future.

    Many of the rural roads I ride on are simple chip & seal -- the stuff's plenty rideable and Beloki
    crashed because he was going too fast for the surface, not because the surface wasn't rideable.
    Nobody else crashed on that corner. It's racing, it's what happens.

    TC
     
  4. On 15 Jul 2003 12:55:28 -0700, [email protected] (Joe Hurley) wrote:

    >In the spirit of every cloud having a silver lining, I propose the following:
    >
    >Perhaps in the wake of yesterday's crash, le Societe Tour de France in the future should scout out
    >roads to be used for future routes of the Tour and either avoid those that are paved with this sort
    >of chip & seal job or tell the municipality either you repave these roads with some decent
    >pavement, or we move the tour somewhere else and you lose all the revenue of all those people who
    >come to watch the tour.
    >
    Yeah, we'll move it to those "interesting" roads into Marseille today?

    Regards! Stephen
     
  5. Asqui

    Asqui Guest

    Joe Hurley wrote: [...]
    > Not a big problem with the wide tires of automobiles or even motorcycles, but with the 2-inch wide
    > tires of bicycles, there's much less margin for error.
    [...]

    Two inch wide tires? They're barely two *centimetres* wide!

    Dani
     
  6. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    "asqui" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Joe Hurley wrote: [...]
    > > Not a big problem with the wide tires of automobiles or even motorcycles, but with the 2-inch
    > > wide tires of bicycles, there's much less margin for error.
    > [...]
    >
    > Two inch wide tires? They're barely two *centimetres* wide!
    >
    > Dani

    Two tires each an inch wide?
     
  7. Asqui

    Asqui Guest

    Nick Burns wrote:
    > "asqui" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Joe Hurley wrote: [...]
    >>> Not a big problem with the wide tires of automobiles or even motorcycles, but with the 2-inch
    >>> wide tires of bicycles, there's much less margin for error.
    >> [...]
    >>
    >> Two inch wide tires? They're barely two *centimetres* wide!
    >>
    >> Dani
    >
    > Two tires each an inch wide?

    I thought they used insanely small tires, like half an inch or less?
     
  8. David Off

    David Off Guest

    [email protected] (Joe Hurley) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In the spirit of every cloud having a silver lining, I propose the following:
    >
    > Perhaps in the wake of yesterday's crash, le Societe Tour de France in the future should scout out
    > roads to be used for future routes of the Tour and either avoid those that are paved with this
    > sort of chip & seal job or tell the municipality either you repave these roads with some decent
    > pavement

    Go back and watch some of the classic Tour de France films, such as the duals between Ocana and
    Merckx and you will see that the summit of many of the mountain cols had no surface on them at all
    at that time.

    Although the crash in question occured on a small hill the surface on many mountain roads is poor as
    the road is under snow for 6-8 months of the year leaving little time for maintenance.

    For example the Galibier opened at the end of May this year and will close again with the first
    snows of winter.

    Maybe you should consider 6 day racing as a spectator sport.

    David
     
  9. "David Off" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Joe Hurley) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > In the spirit of every cloud having a silver lining, I propose the following:
    > >
    > > Perhaps in the wake of yesterday's crash, le Societe Tour de France in the future should scout
    > > out roads to be used for future routes of the Tour and either avoid those that are paved with
    > > this sort of chip & seal job or tell the municipality either you repave these roads with some
    > > decent pavement
    >
    > Go back and watch some of the classic Tour de France films, such as the duals between Ocana and
    > Merckx and you will see that the summit of many of the mountain cols had no surface on them at all
    > at that time.
    >
    > Although the crash in question occured on a small hill the surface on many mountain roads is poor
    > as the road is under snow for 6-8 months of the year leaving little time for maintenance.
    >
    > For example the Galibier opened at the end of May this year and will close again with the first
    > snows of winter.
    >
    > Maybe you should consider 6 day racing as a spectator sport.

    I'll guess that 6 days have their share of crashes also.

    Risk is part of bike racing (and life).
     
  10. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    [email protected] (Joe Hurley) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In the spirit of every cloud having a silver lining, I propose the following:
    (snip)

    Perhaps you should check into track racing.
     
  11. >>>SNIP<<<>

    > I'll guess that 6 days have their share of crashes also.
    >
    >
    > Risk is part of bike racing (and life).

    I agree with you on this. Why do people wish to reduce everything to it's lowest common denominator?
    Certainly, while caring for infants this is a sensible approach to child rearing. But for the rest
    of life? Danger exists, chance plays a role in everyone's life, shit happens. Yes it is unfortunate
    Beloki crashed. There are several responses to this: Learn from it, or; Oh my God we have to change
    this so it never happens again. Following the second choice is ridiculous. Riders take
    responsibility. Beloki was emotional and afterwards was reported to be apologizing to his team
    mates. He wasn't trying to rip the Tour for the racing conditions. The conditions are the race.
    Challenge is what makes life. Reducing everything to conformity, mediocrity and blandness feeds
    lawyers. Mike
     
  12. "Michael McMurray" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >>>SNIP<<<>
    >
    > > I'll guess that 6 days have their share of crashes also.
    > >
    > >
    > > Risk is part of bike racing (and life).
    >
    >
    > I agree with you on this. Why do people wish to reduce everything to it's lowest common
    > denominator? Certainly, while caring for infants this is a sensible approach to child rearing. But
    > for the rest of life? Danger exists, chance plays a role in everyone's life, shit happens. Yes it
    > is unfortunate Beloki crashed. There are several responses to this: Learn from it, or; Oh my God
    > we have to change this so it never happens again. Following the second choice is ridiculous.
    > Riders take responsibility. Beloki was emotional and afterwards was reported to be apologizing to
    > his team mates. He wasn't trying to rip the Tour for the racing conditions. The conditions are the
    > race. Challenge is what makes life. Reducing everything to conformity, mediocrity and blandness
    > feeds lawyers.

    You're a doc right? I'll bet you love lawyers.
     
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