potluck supper ratio?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Jan 23, 2006.

  1. If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    thanks
     
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  2. PickyJaz

    PickyJaz Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    > what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...

    I would bring enough to serve 20, though possibly as two seperate
    dishes. Such as a side of seasoned, buttered Brussels sprouts as well
    as a different vegetable; a chicken dish, as well as a roasted red
    meat dish. As to categories, most comon are main, side, salad and
    desert.

    Picky
     
  3. aem

    aem Guest

    PickyJaz wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    > > what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > > And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...


    > I would bring enough to serve 20, though possibly as two seperate
    > dishes.


    That's ridiculous. If all 20 followed that advice you'd have food for
    400. Bring an ordinary family quantity, something that will serve 4 to
    6. -aem
     
  4. Jude

    Jude Guest

    I'd bring a casserole or something comparable in size. Probably feeds
    between 6 and 8 if I went by recipe. One regular dinner-sized dish.
    Remember that at potlucks, a lot of folks (like me!) will want tiny
    servings of lots of different things, so something that s"serves 8"
    might well serve about 15 people at a potluck. I agree with aem - don't
    bring for 20 people!

    The categories we used for a non-breakfast potluck were: munchies /
    appetizers / finger foods; salads; side dishes & veggies; main dishes;
    desserts; and miscellaneous, which included a few spots for non-cooking
    types to sign up for paper goods, cutlery, beverages, etc.
     
  5. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    > what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    > thanks


    With 20 people present, it's all about everyone getting a little
    taste of everything. Dinner plates aren't big enough to hold 20 normal
    sized servings, so most will get 6-8 small servings of what they find
    appealing and even then, their plates will be loaded. Best case
    scenario is the host provides enough meat for all and the guests bring
    appetizers, side dishes, breads and desserts. A good host will
    coordinate well enough with his invited guests so there are equal
    amounts of each to ensure the meal is complete and no one goes home
    hungry. Kev
     
  6. Jude

    Jude Guest

    kevnbro wrote:
    Best case
    > scenario is the host provides enough meat for all and the guests bring
    > appetizers, side dishes, breads and desserts. A good host will
    > coordinate well enough with his invited guests so there are equal
    > amounts of each to ensure the meal is complete and no one goes home
    > hungry. Kev


    Ah, but you're assuming this is hosted at someone's home. When I think
    about potlucks, I think of the workplace (for me, the teacher's lounge
    at school; for my honey, the office), where you need to include all th
    other consumable items ilke paper goods, silverware, etc. as a
    bring-along category.

    I remember one time that nobody brought in disposable bowls, just paper
    plates, so it made the lovely crockpots with soups & stews useless.

    However I agree that if you're hosting at home, it's nice to do the
    main course (offer a choice of a couple things IMHO) and get the guests
    to bring all the other good stuff. Be sure to make it clear whether you
    are offering beverages, though, or if they shuld be a category, and
    then be sure to specify alcoholic or non, so there's something for
    everyone. I'm remembering a potluck at my friend Paula's house, where
    there was a TON of food, a punchbowl full of ice, about 35-40 people,
    and only 2 2-liter bottles of 7-Up. She thought a few people were
    bringing juice and soda; guests thought she was providing drinks.
    (Water's fine with me, but not with everyone it seems. Several people
    were unhappy about the lack of soda specifically.)
     
  7. Jude wrote:

    > Ah, but you're assuming this is hosted at someone's home. When I think
    > about potlucks, I think of the workplace (for me, the teacher's lounge
    > at school; for my honey, the office), where you need to include all th
    > other consumable items ilke paper goods, silverware, etc. as a
    > bring-along category.


    Right you are - I shud've mentioned this. It's an organization having
    a potluck in a hall where utensils etc will be available.
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    > what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    > thanks


    Bring for 8. And I hate assignments at potlucks -- that's why they call
    them potluck! :) If you wind up with 8 salads, 12 desserts, and no
    entree -- tough rocks.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    "kevnbro" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >A good host will
    > coordinate well enough with his invited guests so there are equal
    > amounts of each to ensure the meal is complete and no one goes home
    > hungry. Kev


    Pishtosh, Kev! Pishtosh!
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
     
  10. Puester

    Puester Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    >>If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    >>what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    >>And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    >>thanks

    >
    >
    > Bring for 8. And I hate assignments at potlucks -- that's why they call
    > them potluck! :) If you wind up with 8 salads, 12 desserts, and no
    > entree -- tough rocks.



    Yep. If you assign or ask for commitments ahead of time, 9 timnes out
    of 10 the person will either forget what she/he promised or not feel
    like making it and will bring something totally different.

    Wing it.

    gloria p
     
  11. modom

    modom Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 20:26:25 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    >> what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    >> And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    >> thanks

    >
    >Bring for 8. And I hate assignments at potlucks -- that's why they call
    >them potluck! :) If you wind up with 8 salads, 12 desserts, and no
    >entree -- tough rocks.


    I went to one of those. Everybody brought soup.


    modom
     
  12. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >Ah, but you're assuming this is hosted at someone's home.

    Actually, I was assuming someone was in charge. kev
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 20:26:25 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >> If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    > >> what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > >> And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    > >> thanks

    > >
    > >Bring for 8. And I hate assignments at potlucks -- that's why they call
    > >them potluck! :) If you wind up with 8 salads, 12 desserts, and no
    > >entree -- tough rocks.

    >
    > I went to one of those. Everybody brought soup.
    >
    >
    > modom


    Cool! Any good?
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
     
  14. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    > what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    > thanks
    >



    Take more than enough for your family; not necessarily a lot more.

    Take something that you make well. I usually take a 10" homemade pie.
    Or a double recipe of brownies if I need to whip something up fast.

    Kentucky Fried or Popeye's fried chicken is usually a big hit.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  15. Potlucks are my favorite oportunity to show off. I tell the host to
    find out what other people are making, then ask me to fill in what's
    needed. That almost invariably turns out to be vegetable side dishes.
    (Lots of people make good lasagne, salad, and rich desserts.) I'll
    bring asparagus with dip, carrots in lemon and ginger, baked butternut
    squash, parsley and quinoa salad, etc. These are all simple, good
    dishes, but people call me a culinary genius because I'm able and
    willing to bring vegetables to a meal that's otherwise too rich.


    --Lia
     
  16. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    modom wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 20:26:25 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    >>> what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    >>> And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides
    >>> etc... thanks

    >>
    >> Bring for 8. And I hate assignments at potlucks -- that's why they
    >> call them potluck! :) If you wind up with 8 salads, 12 desserts,
    >> and no entree -- tough rocks.

    >
    > I went to one of those. Everybody brought soup.
    >
    >
    > modom


    The biggest problem with not having a sign-up sheet (I prefer to call it
    that rather than "assignments" - sounds too much like going back to school)
    is you'll wind up with 20 desserts and no main dish type meals. We
    practically had to force people to not all bring store-bought pies and cakes
    so there would be something for *lunch*, or at least something for folks who
    are diabetic. Big hits at the office were always that broccoli-cheese-rice
    casserole and of course the meatballs in the crock pot; 'R' thought he'd get
    in trouble for bringing in a bottle of booze to mix with the sauce.

    One guy's fiance brought homemade spanikopita, still hot from the oven; she
    carried it in wearing oven mits. How sweet! She didn't even stay for
    lunch, just dropped it off. YUM!

    And yes, someone has to bring the plates, bowls, etc. When I made red beans
    & rice in the crock pot for these events I always picked up a package of
    bowls and plastic soup spoons, too.

    Jill
     
  17. On 23 Jan 2006, aem wrote:
    >
    > PickyJaz wrote:
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > > > If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    > > > what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > > > And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...

    >
    > > I would bring enough to serve 20, though possibly as two seperate
    > > dishes.



    >
    > That's ridiculous. If all 20 followed that advice you'd have food for
    > 400. Bring an ordinary family quantity, something that will serve 4 to
    > 6. -aem
    >
    >


    I don't agree with this at all. I can just see you coming to a
    covered dish with 20 in attendance and bringing two eggs, deviled; or 1
    two-litre coke; or six cookies. I've seen it done - and usually by a
    husband and wife towing 3 or 4 kids.

    There are a lot of things to be considered.

    Of the 20 in attendance, how many households are represented?

    If 20 (like an office gathering), you'll have 20 contributors.
    If 5 (like 5 families of 4), you'll only have 5 comtributors.

    Is there a designated main dish?

    Sometimes, 2 or 3 will go in together to buy a ham, ground beef for
    grilled burgers, or something.
    (At 4 pieces of chicken each, it would take 5 <g>)

    These people will need to be deducted from the total contributors (in
    order for you to calculate how many servings you need to bring)

    Where are the plates, cups, napkins, flatware, etc coming from?

    If purchased, subtract another contributor.

    What's to drink and where is it coming from? Ice?
    Subtract another contributor

    If liquor, (the mixers, too) as part of the party.

    You may lose another contributor or two.

    If you start out with 20 contributors, now your down by 5 to 8.

    1 or 2 people (out of 20 contributors) will usually bring an appetizer.
    2 or 3 will usually bring a salad
    1 will bring bread
    3 or 4 will usually bring dessert.

    That's another 10 and you still don't have a veggie

    The one that brings bread might bring a veggie (hopefully more than 4
    servings) unless it's homemade bread, then that is a nice contribution.

    If you've got some slackers, and you always do, then you got no veggies.
    (or dessert or salad or bread or however the breakdown falls) Or you have
    7 desserts and nothing to drink, no cup to put it in, and no ice to cool
    it down. Or you have 3 green bean casseroles, 2 bowls of potato salad, and
    2 bowls of baked beans.

    Covered dish events aren't as easy as they seem. They really do need to be
    coordinated. The easiest way is to talk to one another.

    Most people have a favorite dish they like to make and they will
    volunteer. Just subtract that dish from the total areas to be covered.
    After the volunteer items are noted, then ask for volunteers for items not
    covered.

    Cost and time to prepare make a difference. 1 fresh apple cake is worth
    2 veggies and bread <g>. So, somebody might be willing to bring two
    veggies that don't take a lot of work (frozen corn and canned English
    Peas) and a pack of store-bought rolls, while the one only brings one
    fresh apple cake.

    If it is an office group of "acquaintances", things get a lot more
    complicated real quick. But, a sign-up sheet works well. List the
    categories and let people sign up, telling what they will bring.
    This helps everybody else know what is being made (so you don't end up
    with 3 green bean casseroles).

    So, what you take and how many servings depends on the situation. If you
    are just an invited guest, then I'm with Picky, I'd take one dish of 20
    servings or 2 of 10 or 12 servings each. You might want to talk to others
    that are invited (if possible) or call the host or cooridinator and ask if
    all the categories are covered or if there is something specific you can
    bring or if you can help out by bringing something extra (above and beyond
    your one dish).

    Elaine, too
     
  18. jmcquown wrote on 24 Jan 2006 in rec.food.cooking

    > modom wrote:
    > > On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 20:26:25 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> [email protected] wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other
    > >>> ppl, what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    > >>> And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides
    > >>> etc... thanks
    > >>
    > >> Bring for 8. And I hate assignments at potlucks -- that's why they
    > >> call them potluck! :) If you wind up with 8 salads, 12 desserts,
    > >> and no entree -- tough rocks.

    > >
    > > I went to one of those. Everybody brought soup.
    > >
    > >
    > > modom

    >
    > The biggest problem with not having a sign-up sheet (I prefer to call
    > it that rather than "assignments" - sounds too much like going back to
    > school) is you'll wind up with 20 desserts and no main dish type
    > meals. We practically had to force people to not all bring
    > store-bought pies and cakes so there would be something for *lunch*,
    > or at least something for folks who are diabetic. Big hits at the
    > office were always that broccoli-cheese-rice casserole and of course
    > the meatballs in the crock pot; 'R' thought he'd get in trouble for
    > bringing in a bottle of booze to mix with the sauce.
    >
    > One guy's fiance brought homemade spanikopita, still hot from the
    > oven; she carried it in wearing oven mits. How sweet! She didn't
    > even stay for lunch, just dropped it off. YUM!
    >
    > And yes, someone has to bring the plates, bowls, etc. When I made red
    > beans & rice in the crock pot for these events I always picked up a
    > package of bowls and plastic soup spoons, too.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >
    >


    At my last office pot luck the coffee fund supplies the coffee,
    condiments, plastic plates, buns, etc... Everybody knew any leftovers
    would be kept for grazing and lunches for the next several days. There
    was 5 or 6 crockpots going in the conference room and the 2 office
    microwaves were used alot as well. I did a crockpot ham, there was
    crocpot mac and cheese, Crock potted grape jelly meat balls, a chilli,
    several different veggie casseroles, some sort of pizza casserole
    dealie, a mexican taco csserole thingie, salads, several tortillia roll
    up thingies and 3- types of desserts. We didn't get any only cooked
    veggies dishes. We used a sign up sheet method. Most dishes were enough
    to supply limited seconds of small servings. So say enough as a meal for
    12-15.

    I think my 10 lb Pork pininic roll cost me around 10-12 dollars (CND) to
    buy. So for my 10 dollars I got a good feeding of fresh homemade food in
    a party atmosphere and 2 days of leftovers. Excellent deal!

    --
    The eyes are the mirrors....
    But the ears...Ah the ears.
    The ears keep the hat up.
     
  19. The Cook

    The Cook Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 20:26:25 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> If you're participating in a potluck affair with, say, 20 other ppl,
    >> what amount do you bring? Enough to serve 6, 8 ...?
    >> And how would you divide the categories - main, dessert, sides etc...
    >> thanks

    >
    >Bring for 8. And I hate assignments at potlucks -- that's why they call
    >them potluck! :) If you wind up with 8 salads, 12 desserts, and no
    >entree -- tough rocks.



    Amen. When I was planning the family reunion DH kept wondering if we
    were going to have enough to eat and enough variety. We had enough
    food to feed a small army for a couple of days. There were meats,
    vegetables, salads, and desserts. This was without any assignments.
    Most people brought a couple of different things.

    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974
     
  20. biig

    biig Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > Jude wrote:
    >
    > > Ah, but you're assuming this is hosted at someone's home. When I think
    > > about potlucks, I think of the workplace (for me, the teacher's lounge
    > > at school; for my honey, the office), where you need to include all th
    > > other consumable items ilke paper goods, silverware, etc. as a
    > > bring-along category.

    >
    > Right you are - I shud've mentioned this. It's an organization having
    > a potluck in a hall where utensils etc will be available.


    Potluck is just that.....potluck. You get what you get. This
    understood, the general tradition when our church has one, is to bring
    plenty to feed your own family in attendance. If everyone does this,
    there is plenty of food. We are only two, but I'll usually bring a dish
    for 6 because lots of recipes are set for 6. But a family of 6 could
    bring something to serve 8. It seems, that at a function like this,
    people tend to eat more than they would at home. We never run out
    totally, only out of the most popular dishes. No one goes home hungry.
    We have a chili potluck coming up in a couple of weeks. The choices to
    bring are chili or a dessert. One year they put all the dishes brought
    in a large roaster and I'm told it was the best chili they every
    had..... I'm not a chili eater, so I'll get to sample the
    desserts...lol
    ....Sharon
     
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