Powdercoating questions

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Lance Edwards, May 1, 2006.

  1. I am thinking of having a '90s lugged steel bicycle frame (and fork)
    powdercoated, I have stripped it of components. Any advice from those who
    have had bike frames powdercoated?

    Can anyone recommend any good powdercoaters in the Brisbane area who have
    done bicycles to a high standard?

    Have you experienced any problems, like they forgot to mask off the BB or
    the coating fell off while JRA?

    Thanks,
    Lance
     
    Tags:


  2. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    Lance, here's a cut and paste from fixed.org.au, a Brisbane guy had an
    old Raleigh powdercoated bright orange. It looks great in the flesh,
    and is bottom left in this photo:

    http://img163.imageshack.us/my.php?image=mall2mall1tx.jpg

    ------
    Ace Powder Coating
    65 Randall St Slacks Creek QLD 4127
    ph: (07) 3209 2847

    Cost me $40 for sandblasting, $35 for powdercoat and $7 GST. Took about
    a a week as they actually sub-contract out the sandblasting and only
    ship items on certain days.

    You could choose from a variety of stock colours though nothing too
    spectacular, except the orange of course:) Other colours were availible
    (I think) but had to be ordered especially and cost more.

    There were a couple of minor blemishes in the job, but only if you look
    very hard. They also got some powder in the bottom bracket threads so I
    would make a special note of getting them to protect it properly, like
    they did for the headset/steerer.

    All in all I was happy with the job especially at that price.
    -------
     
  3. slaw

    slaw New Member

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    Make sure that they have experience doing bikes. I remember talking to a frame builder who had to send a frame to someone who was not his regular painter and they'd sandblasted the frame so much that it only took a small press with a screwdriver to poke a hole in the tubing.
     
  4. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    Lance, here's a cut and paste from fixed.org.au, a Brisbane guy had an
    old Raleigh powdercoated bright orange. It looks great in the flesh,
    and is bottom left in this photo:

    http://img163.imageshack.us/my.php?image=mall2mall1tx.jpg

    ------
    Ace Powder Coating
    65 Randall St Slacks Creek QLD 4127
    ph: (07) 3209 2847

    Cost me $40 for sandblasting, $35 for powdercoat and $7 GST. Took about
    a a week as they actually sub-contract out the sandblasting and only
    ship items on certain days.

    You could choose from a variety of stock colours though nothing too
    spectacular, except the orange of course:) Other colours were availible
    (I think) but had to be ordered especially and cost more.

    There were a couple of minor blemishes in the job, but only if you look
    very hard. They also got some powder in the bottom bracket threads so I
    would make a special note of getting them to protect it properly, like
    they did for the headset/steerer.

    All in all I was happy with the job especially at that price.
    -------
     
  5. Lance Edwards wrote:
    > I am thinking of having a '90s lugged steel bicycle frame (and fork)
    > powdercoated, I have stripped it of components. Any advice from those who
    > have had bike frames powdercoated?
    >
    > Can anyone recommend any good powdercoaters in the Brisbane area who have
    > done bicycles to a high standard?
    >
    > Have you experienced any problems, like they forgot to mask off the BB or
    > the coating fell off while JRA?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Lance


    I had an old Colnago done by Northside Powder Coaters at Everton Hills
    and wasn't happy with the result. It was pretty rusty again in one
    year, it must have been too thin or something. Put old bolts in any
    orifices, biddon bolts, old BB cups, rear deraileur bolt etc. Funnily
    enough I went for powder coating because it had the reputation of not
    being as glossy as spray painting but much more robust. It looked great
    at first and I was impressed with the glossy finish but it didn't last
    long at all. I must sweat battery acid or something. I'd recommend
    finding a place that uses something other than sand for the blasting
    too, there are other options which are gentler on thin steel tubes.

    Bruce.
     
  6. Poiter

    Poiter New Member

    Joined:
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    They don't actually use "sand" any more due to respiratory diseases etc.
    Silicon carbide, alumina, garnet and glass beads.

    Glass beads used for quality steel frames afaik.

    Poit
     
  7. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Tue, 02 May 2006 13:24:17 +1000, Poiter wrote:

    > Glass beads used for quality steel frames afaik.


    Glass and sand are chemically identical. There may be differences in
    particle size beforehand, but after hitting a steel tube I'm not going to
    be making any bets.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Researchers in Fairbanks Alaska announced last week that they have
    discovered a superconductor which will operate at room temperature.
     
  8. Donga

    Donga Guest

    It might be worth chatting to Joe Cosgrove, who makes Frezoni frames
    and I think paints them too. He has helped me with advice on other
    matters and seems to know his stuff.

    Donga
     
  9. Thanks for the replies.

    I'm a bit worried about loss of tube thickness, so I'll see what the
    options are for gentle paint removal.
     
  10. Friday

    Friday Guest

    Random Data wrote:
    > On Tue, 02 May 2006 13:24:17 +1000, Poiter wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Glass beads used for quality steel frames afaik.

    >
    >
    > Glass and sand are chemically identical. There may be differences in
    > particle size beforehand, but after hitting a steel tube I'm not going to
    > be making any bets.
    >


    It's also to do with the shape of the particles too, the glass ones are
    rounded.
     
  11. ghostgum

    ghostgum New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
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    0
    Unless the sand is from an ocean beach in Australia (mostly broken up shells) or the glass comes from a computer monitor (partly lead oxide).
     
  12. Donga wrote:
    > It might be worth chatting to Joe Cosgrove, who makes Frezoni frames
    > and I think paints them too. He has helped me with advice on other
    > matters and seems to know his stuff.
    >
    > Donga


    Joe also paints the Llewellyns for Darrell. Joe repainted an old
    Daccordi for me a few years back. It was around $200 I think. Joe did a
    great job, it looked great, but the paint seemed particularly fragile,
    lots of chips and scratches which then started to rust which made me
    try powder coating the next time. Titanium looks good for future
    frames.

    Bruce.
     
  13. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Bruce Dickson wrote:
    >
    > Donga wrote:
    > > It might be worth chatting to Joe Cosgrove, who makes Frezoni frames
    > > and I think paints them too. He has helped me with advice on other
    > > matters and seems to know his stuff.
    > >
    > > Donga

    >
    > Joe also paints the Llewellyns for Darrell. Joe repainted an old
    > Daccordi for me a few years back. It was around $200 I think. Joe did a
    > great job, it looked great, but the paint seemed particularly fragile,
    > lots of chips and scratches which then started to rust which made me
    > try powder coating the next time. Titanium looks good for future
    > frames.
    >
    > Bruce.


    I rode next to a titanium bike this morning. Very s3xy.

    Tam
     
  14. Friday wrote:

    > Random Data wrote:
    >> On Tue, 02 May 2006 13:24:17 +1000, Poiter wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Glass beads used for quality steel frames afaik.

    >>
    >>
    >> Glass and sand are chemically identical. There may be differences in
    >> particle size beforehand, but after hitting a steel tube I'm not going to
    >> be making any bets.
    >>

    >
    > It's also to do with the shape of the particles too, the glass ones are
    > rounded.


    Agreed.

    <nerd alert>
    This is partly because sand is mostly silica crystals which have nice sharp
    corners and edges, while glass is not crystalline at all. Common 'soda
    glass' (formed from sodium and calcium oxides in combination with silica)
    is an amorphous stuff which is also softer than silica.
    </nerd alert>

    All of these reasons could help make glass blasting less aggressive than
    sand blasting.

    Cheers,

    Vince
     
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