Power drink recommendations?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by saki, Mar 4, 2005.

  1. saki

    saki Guest

    If it's not raining Sunday morning I plan to do the 22-mile L.A. Acura bike
    tour prior to the marathon. My training rides are usually 15 miles; I did
    twenty last weekend with no trouble.

    Because this is a route unfamiliar to me (and because it has some slight
    elevation changes) I'm concerned about needing a boost in the latter stages
    of the ride. Normally I just carry water. I'm unfamiliar with all the
    modern power drinks (they weren't around thirty years ago when I did my
    long-distance riding) and don't know whether they're really helpful.

    Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy kick?

    ----
    [email protected]
     
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  2. Neil Brooks

    Neil Brooks Guest

    saki <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If it's not raining Sunday morning I plan to do the 22-mile L.A. Acura bike
    >tour prior to the marathon. My training rides are usually 15 miles; I did
    >twenty last weekend with no trouble.
    >
    >Because this is a route unfamiliar to me (and because it has some slight
    >elevation changes) I'm concerned about needing a boost in the latter stages
    >of the ride. Normally I just carry water. I'm unfamiliar with all the
    >modern power drinks (they weren't around thirty years ago when I did my
    >long-distance riding) and don't know whether they're really helpful.
    >
    >Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    >instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy kick?


    You'd be fine with Gatorade. Pick a flavor.

    Ride it rain OR shine. If it rains, it'll be the only chance you have
    to breathe clean air :)

    Neil
    San Diego
     
  3. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    saki wrote:
    > If it's not raining Sunday morning I plan to do the 22-mile L.A.

    Acura bike
    > tour prior to the marathon. My training rides are usually 15 miles; I

    did
    > twenty last weekend with no trouble.
    >
    > Because this is a route unfamiliar to me (and because it has some

    slight
    > elevation changes) I'm concerned about needing a boost in the latter

    stages
    > of the ride. Normally I just carry water. I'm unfamiliar with all the


    > modern power drinks (they weren't around thirty years ago when I did

    my
    > long-distance riding) and don't know whether they're really helpful.
    >
    > Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar,

    for
    > instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy

    kick?
    >


    22 miles shouldn't begin to deplete a healthy person's glycogen
    reserves.
     
  4. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1109961757.555452.94160
    @g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
    > 22 miles shouldn't begin to deplete a healthy person's glycogen
    > reserves.


    Most people have about 2 hours of glycogen at a moderate aerobic pace, so 22
    miles will *begin* to deplete the reserves. Plain water will be fine for most
    people, but a pint or two of gatorade won't hurt, especially on a hot day.
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Ken wrote:
    > "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in

    news:1109961757.555452.94160
    > @g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
    > > 22 miles shouldn't begin to deplete a healthy person's glycogen
    > > reserves.

    >
    > Most people have about 2 hours of glycogen at a moderate aerobic

    pace, so 22
    > miles will *begin* to deplete the reserves. Plain water will be fine

    for most
    > people, but a pint or two of gatorade won't hurt, especially on a hot

    day.

    I think your numbers are wrong. The figure usually cited for glycogen
    reserve is 2,000 kcal. Even a relatively fast pace only burns 20-30
    kcal/mile, and that's split between glycogen and fatty acids. If your
    pace is low enough (>12-14 mph) you won't even touch your glycogen
    reserves.

    Sports drinks are entirely unnecessary marketing inventions. The
    purported goal is to maximize fluid uptake, not provide calories or
    electrolytes, as so many are led to believe.

    At least avoid clear bottles unless your frame and drink match.
     
  6. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 18:27:58 +0000, saki wrote:

    > Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    > instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy kick?


    I like half Coca-cola, half water. Really.

    Cheap, effective, and annoys the health nuts.:D
     
  7. ::dom::

    ::dom:: New Member

    Joined:
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    I drink HEED from Hammer Nutrition. I sometimes use their gels on longer rides.
     
  8. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 18:27:58 +0000, saki wrote:
    >
    >> Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    >> instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy kick?

    >
    > I like half Coca-cola, half water. Really.
    >
    > Cheap, effective, and annoys the health nuts.:D


    This past summer, after a hardworking stint of spreading
    crush gravel in a construction site excavation, without
    eating anything all day, I was left wondering how the heck
    I was going to make it home at the end of the day. I was
    too pooped to walk, let alone ride. I had just enough coin
    to buy a Coke at the gas station next door to the site.

    Boy, that hit the spot! Just remembering that reminds me
    of the rendition of the tune 'Survival' by Yes on their
    first album. I got home okay.

    I also recall how a Coke on an empty stomach can lead to
    some gaseously turbulent consequences. I don't blame ya
    for steppin' on it with water.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  9. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Ken wrote:

    > "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:1109961757.555452.94160 @g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:


    >> 22 miles shouldn't begin to deplete a healthy person's glycogen
    >> reserves.

    >
    > Most people have about 2 hours of glycogen at a moderate aerobic
    > pace, so 22 miles will *begin* to deplete the reserves. Plain water
    > will be fine for most people, but a pint or two of gatorade won't
    > hurt, especially on a hot day.


    That's an hour and a half of riding in the mountains for me, and only an hour by
    the beach where it's flat. I'm not particularly fast, either. I'd say half our
    bike club would have about the same pace.

    I'm not a big sports drink afficianado -- water has always worked fine for me,
    with a little food every couple of hours. Sports drinks do go into your system
    faster though.

    Matt O.
     
  10. "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > maxo <[email protected]> writes:
    >> On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 18:27:58 +0000, saki wrote:
    >>> Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar,
    >>> for
    >>> instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy
    >>> kick?

    >> I like half Coca-cola, half water. Really.
    >> Cheap, effective, and annoys the health nuts.:D

    > This past summer, after a hardworking stint of spreading
    > crush gravel in a construction site excavation, without
    > eating anything all day, I was left wondering how the heck
    > I was going to make it home at the end of the day. I was
    > too pooped to walk, let alone ride. I had just enough coin
    > to buy a Coke at the gas station next door to the site.
    > Boy, that hit the spot! Just remembering that reminds me
    > of the rendition of the tune 'Survival' by Yes on their
    > first album. I got home okay.
    > I also recall how a Coke on an empty stomach can lead to
    > some gaseously turbulent consequences. I don't blame ya
    > for steppin' on it with water.
    > cheers,
    > Tom


    Well actually a number of bike racers use a "flat coke" as a fast recovery
    drink after a race.
    A flat coke would not have all the carbonated bubbles to cause gas problems.
     
  11. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    4 Mar 2005 11:48:20 -0800,
    <[email protected]>,
    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Sports drinks are entirely unnecessary marketing inventions. The
    >purported goal is to maximize fluid uptake, not provide calories or
    >electrolytes, as so many are led to believe.


    Sports drinks were "designed" for feed-lot cattle.
    When in doubt, humans should use honey and drink water.
    --
    zk
     
  12. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Earl Bollinger" <[email protected]> writes:

    > A flat coke would not have all the carbonated bubbles to cause gas problems.


    Yeah, I guess it's a payoff/tradeoff thing :)


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  13. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    >Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    >instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy kick?


    This ride isn't long enough, and not sufficiently longer than what you
    typically ride, that I would expect you going to need anything.

    As an alternative to an energy drink, you might consider having a banana
    shortly before the ride, or perhaps carrying one with you.


    Chris Neary
    [email protected]

    "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
    you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
    loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  14. "saki" <[email protected]> wrote

    [snip]

    > Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with

    sugar, for
    > instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an

    energy kick?

    Well, as people have said, you probably don't ***need*** it at 22
    miles. I don't get the bonk until 40 or 50. However, it does no
    harm to drink something ahead of time.

    I like orange juice diluted to half strength to get the osmotic
    pressure right. If its a cold day, I heat it up, and carry it in a
    thermos flask. A beer can insulator pads out the thermos flask so it
    fits in a water bottle cage.

    Jeremy Parker
     
  15. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sat, 05 Mar 2005 05:40:32 -0600, Earl Bollinger wrote:

    > A flat coke would not have all the carbonated bubbles to cause gas problems.



    When you're out of fuel you NEED gas! :D ;)

    rant alert.

    Reminds me of something I find irritating--go to the bottled water section
    of an American supermarket and you'll be lucky to actually find *mineral*
    water with light carbonation that's so refreshing. It's all boring still
    water sans minerals. How boring. Every now and then a place stocks
    Gerolsteinter or even crappy old Perrier. Even the Mexican bodega will
    sell you real bubbly mineral water...but at the supermarket, it's
    overpriced still "purified" water. Dumb dumb dumb dumb.

    Apropos that...

    In Chicago, if you want cheap real tasty mineral water, just pop into any
    Polish grocery--the Polish and eastern European brands are usually 1.25
    for a 1.5 liter bottle, full of calcium and delicious on their own or with
    a helping of scotch whiskey...
     
  16. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    >Reminds me of something I find irritating--go to the bottled water section
    >of an American supermarket and you'll be lucky to actually find *mineral*
    >water with light carbonation that's so refreshing. It's all boring still
    >water sans minerals. How boring. Every now and then a place stocks
    >Gerolsteinter or even crappy old Perrier. Even the Mexican bodega will
    >sell you real bubbly mineral water...but at the supermarket, it's
    >overpriced still "purified" water. Dumb dumb dumb dumb.


    Costco (at least in the SF Bay Area) sells Pellegrino at reasonable prices.

    Tracey and I developed a taste for the stuff while travelling.



    Chris Neary
    [email protected]

    "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
    you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
    loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  17. Gary Smiley

    Gary Smiley Guest

    I get limes at the produce market really cheap - 10-15 for a dollar. I
    squeeze the juice of 1 lime into a bottle of water. Then I add honey. The
    bees got it right, and they've been making the stuff since way before human
    beings evolved. Then I add a dash of table salt. Costs around 15 cents.
    Sometimes I add extra honey when I want a good spike of energy for the
    hills.
    If you're going to go the Gatorade route, get the Gatorade powder at
    Costco - also around 15 cents per serving.


    "saki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If it's not raining Sunday morning I plan to do the 22-mile L.A. Acura
    > bike
    > tour prior to the marathon. My training rides are usually 15 miles; I did
    > twenty last weekend with no trouble.
    >
    > Because this is a route unfamiliar to me (and because it has some slight
    > elevation changes) I'm concerned about needing a boost in the latter
    > stages
    > of the ride. Normally I just carry water. I'm unfamiliar with all the
    > modern power drinks (they weren't around thirty years ago when I did my
    > long-distance riding) and don't know whether they're really helpful.
    >
    > Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    > instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy
    > kick?
    >
    > ----
    > [email protected]cla.edu
     
  18. "Chris Neary" wrote:
    > >Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    >>instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy
    >>kick?

    >
    > As an alternative to an energy drink, you might consider having a banana
    > shortly before the ride, or perhaps carrying one with you.


    Yep. A good breakfast, and carry a banana or packet of fig newtons with you.
    And a water bottle of course.

    Art Harris
     
  19. On Sun, 6 Mar 2005 09:23:46 -0500, "Arthur Harris" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Chris Neary" wrote:
    >> >Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    >>>instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy
    >>>kick?

    >>
    >> As an alternative to an energy drink, you might consider having a banana
    >> shortly before the ride, or perhaps carrying one with you.

    >
    >Yep. A good breakfast, and carry a banana or packet of fig newtons with you.
    >And a water bottle of course.

    i hope you're doing this in training. i had some problems
    when i introduced fig newtons to my run. you can guess.
    ....thehick
     
  20. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "saki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If it's not raining Sunday morning I plan to do the 22-mile L.A. Acura

    bike
    > tour prior to the marathon. My training rides are usually 15 miles; I did
    > twenty last weekend with no trouble.
    >
    > Because this is a route unfamiliar to me (and because it has some slight
    > elevation changes) I'm concerned about needing a boost in the latter

    stages
    > of the ride. Normally I just carry water. I'm unfamiliar with all the
    > modern power drinks (they weren't around thirty years ago when I did my
    > long-distance riding) and don't know whether they're really helpful.
    >
    > Is there something I could put together at home (ided tea with sugar, for
    > instance) or is there something that's really sure-fire for an energy

    kick?

    I advise you to eat a light breakfast with carbs and you should be fine
    carrying just water. 22 miles shouldn't drain your glycogen reserves. Have
    some oatmeal and orange juice a couple of hours before you go and enjoy the
    ride. Plus, I'm sure there will be refreshment stations along the way with
    gels and bar samples and all sorts of swag. You can probably stock yourself
    up for a while.. :)
     
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