Power Training and Exercise Physiology

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by ryanfiddler2000, Jul 2, 2010.

  1. ryanfiddler2000

    ryanfiddler2000 New Member

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    I'm trying something new. I have considered starting a coaching business but have instead decided to start a training blog offering free training advice and explanations on the physiology of cycling. I am a doctoral candidate at Oklahoma State University in Exercise Physiology with a Masters degree in Nutritional Sciences, additionally I am a category II racer who has just recently started racing again following a two year layoff.
    The blog serves several purposes: 1) because of my profession, writing skills are extremely important. I'm hoping the blog will help to enhance these skills 2) I view the blog as another way to improve my understanding of and ability to explain exercise physiology to others, I hope this will complement my teaching and research responsibilities and 3) I want others to have access to information regarding their own training for those who can't afford a coach or choose not to hire one and/or to help those who do have a coach better understand why they are doing specific training/workouts. If interested check it out at http://www.ryan-fiddler.blogspot.com/
    Any and all feedback is appreciated. Thanks.
     
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  2. fergie

    fergie Member

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    Excellent, look forward to more critical analysis of the cycling related literature. I enjoy reading Bryan Chung's blog for the same reason although he is not cycling specific.

    Evidence-Based Fitness
     
  3. Enriss

    Enriss New Member

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    Awesome! I look forward to many great posts!
     
  4. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Very nice.....thanks for sharing the link
     
  5. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, why was the study into carbs and carb+protien only done at 55% of V02 Max?

    Does anyone race at this low level unless they're doing a really really long event? I appreciate that it's a little harder to replicate results when pushing people to their limit but isn't 55% a wee bit low?

    Just a quick calci-estimation using easy numbers. If my FTP was 300 watts and V02 max tops out about 20% over that (roughly) that'd be ~360watts. 55% of that is just under 200 watts. Now personally, I'm no Eddy Merckx but at 200watts I'm using a bunch of fat as fuel source and protein, or lack thereof, probably wouldn't be an issue on rides less than 3 hours. Either way 200 watts is all day pace and straight off the bat I wouldn't expect any difference unless I ceased all carbohydrate intake.

    That said, during a recent 200 mile ride in the mountains that had 20,000+ft of climbing I was still putting out between 170 and 195 watts on the final couple of passes despite puking a few times earlier in the event and not being able to drink anything other that very watered down carbohydrate drink. Couldn't keep anything solid down after the 5 hour mark. Given that I lost 9lbs during the event it'd be safe to say that I was carbohydrate depleted and dehydrated and still riding near that 55% mark after 15hours of on the bike time, with the last significant amount of carbohydrates drank/eaten and 'kept down' 10 hours earlier.

    Why not pick a 2 hour race pace to see if protien helps when riding at 'full gas' or do a long ride study at 55% over 6+ hours? Just curious.
     
  6. kopride

    kopride Member

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    I noticed in your blog that you advocate weight training. That is a very controversial topic on this board. I'm curious as to whether you have any scientific support of the idea that resistance training improves cycling performance. Or, do you just lift because you like lifting?
     
  7. cutegirl

    cutegirl New Member

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    nice thank u
     
  8. cutegirl

    cutegirl New Member

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    balancing is the very important to cycling
     
  9. ryanfiddler2000

    ryanfiddler2000 New Member

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    Sorry for the late response. It seems like I sometimes get notification of posts and others times do not. Regarding the carbohydrate study: I agree that 2 hours at 55% VO2 max is a low intensity, however, the aim of their study was to assess the two drinks on late-exercise performance, which was during the 1 hour TT that followed the 2 hours at 55% VO2max. This would actually replicate a road race to some degree. Considering the average VO2max for participants in the study was 63 ml/kg/min, I think the protocol was adequate for simulating "late-exercise performance". Also, during research you always have to consider the difficulty of what you're asking the subjects to do; in this study they were asking the subjects to do TWO trials both lasting THREE HOURS on an indoor-trainer! I'm not sure anyone would participate if they had made it any harder.
     
  10. ryanfiddler2000

    ryanfiddler2000 New Member

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    If everyone doesn't mind, could you all post replies to the comments section on the blog too, that way I will receive notification and be able to respond quicker. Thanks for the feedback, much appreciated.
     
  11. ryanfiddler2000

    ryanfiddler2000 New Member

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    There are studies that have showed weight lifting improves cycling efficiency. I do not believe there are any studies that show weight lifting increases peak oxygen consumption (VO2max). Increasing efficiency however, is critical to "staying fresh", in other words, you're able to ride at a given sub-maximal intensity requiring less oxygen than before you lifted weights. I will do a proper blog post on the subject and try to identify the specific study I am referring to. Honestly, I'm still on the fence regarding weight lifting. I do it b/c it's extremely convenient considering my office is literally in a gym. I can sneak away for 30 minutes at a time very easily and lift. I don't think weight lifting is for everyone however, some people hate it. I would never suggest someone ride less and lift more if they absolutely despised the gym.
     
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