Powertap batteries?



cuocciom

New Member
Jan 13, 2006
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I haven't had to replace the hub batteries in my PowerTap SL yet, but I imagine I will soon. I've had the powermeter since late December, so probably put 150-200 hours on it.
The owner's manual lists Silver Oxide #357 batteries. I'm not familiar with these, and I haven't seen them in the stores. Any good places to find them?
I've also noticed that the heart rate function drops out fairly often for minutes at a time. I've replaced the 2032 battery twice. Is this function drop normal.
Otherwise, I think power training may help me improve my performance. I'll be 56 in April, and I currently weigh 68 kilograms. I raced last year for the first time in 20 years; I did okay, but I noticed that I lacked the "grunt" power that the best riders in my age class had (especially at Mt Evans in Colorado). This year I've worked my 30 minute lactate threshold average up from 259 to ~275 in the past three weeks. I haven't tried 2x20 or 2xanything yet. I've also started getting some online coaching from John Verheul in Santa Fe, NM. I've seen his name in this forum, and I believe he can help me to structure and discipline my training more than I have in the past.
I'd like to hear from other riders in my age group. Have you seen benefits from power training?
 

rule62

New Member
Aug 16, 2004
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Keep in mind though that it is possible to ride in stretches that have a lot of electical interference which will cut your HR signal out as well. In answer to your question about the batteries, Radio Shack...Staples...Walmart...Walgreens...or any place that sells and services watch batteries. You'll probably pay more for them there though.

For me, HR drop out typically gets fixed by making sure that I have a tight and wet connection with the chest strap. If that doesn't do it, then replacing the battery in my strap usually does it. Last thing I try then is the battery in my CPU.

Otherwise, yeah power is really helpful because the only way to cheat it is through better technique and improved fitness/ability. But that isn't really cheating, is it? Coaching has helped me a lot as well...in terms of staying motivated, avoiding injury, and understanding more about what I am doing, why, how to do it properly for the best results, and how to peak for goal events.

Sounds like you are in good shape to get better. Good luck and let us know how it's going. ;)
 

palewin

New Member
Oct 29, 2004
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cuocciom said:
I haven't had to replace the hub batteries in my PowerTap SL yet, but I imagine I will soon. I've had the powermeter since late December, so probably put 150-200 hours on it.
The owner's manual lists Silver Oxide #357 batteries. I'm not familiar with these, and I haven't seen them in the stores. Any good places to find them?
I've also noticed that the heart rate function drops out fairly often for minutes at a time. I've replaced the 2032 battery twice. Is this function drop normal.
Otherwise, I think power training may help me improve my performance. I'll be 56 in April, and I currently weigh 68 kilograms. I raced last year for the first time in 20 years; I did okay, but I noticed that I lacked the "grunt" power that the best riders in my age class had (especially at Mt Evans in Colorado). This year I've worked my 30 minute lactate threshold average up from 259 to ~275 in the past three weeks. I haven't tried 2x20 or 2xanything yet. I've also started getting some online coaching from John Verheul in Santa Fe, NM. I've seen his name in this forum, and I believe he can help me to structure and discipline my training more than I have in the past.
I'd like to hear from other riders in my age group. Have you seen benefits from power training?
Basically a "supporting post" for Rule's posting: the #357 batteries are a standard watch battery, and most supermarkets and pharmacy chains which have a "battery center" carry #357s along with the more common AA and AAA batteries. I think all the #357s are silver oxide, but check the packaging. You will find that the batteries are easy to replace, the only problem is finding a wrench to remove the battery cover - I use a large pipe wrench since it opens far enough to put one jaw on the circumference of the cover, and the other "catches" one of the molded spots.
As for the HR display, it is generally considered the weak point of the PT. I get lots of HR dropouts, no matter what I do. However there is still enough HR data to get useful averages to match up with the power readings for intervals.
Lastly, as a 58-yr-old Master's racer in NJ (I was a cat3 back in the late60s-early70s, re-entered the sport about 5 years ago), welcome! I've been working with one of the CTS coaches for about 2 1/2 years, and with power for about a year now, and I think both are helping. My power numbers are definitely better this year than last. However I always have trouble quantifying the benefits in terms of racing success, because its not clear to me whether anything other than grafting a new "motor" onto my body will make me an "alpha male" in our competitive group. (My observation is that in this age group, anyone who doesn't feel that they have a shot at doing well has dropped out long ago, and we have an over-abundence of ex-Nat'l class riders left in the mix.) But I am certain that the power training is letting me get the most out of the abilities I've got.
 

zaskar

New Member
Aug 3, 2003
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Since the subject of battery replacement came up, can anyone tell me if you have to set up the CPU again after replacing the battery? or is setup stored in memory.
 

Woofer

New Member
Dec 31, 2004
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zaskar said:
Since the subject of battery replacement came up, can anyone tell me if you have to set up the CPU again after replacing the battery? or is setup stored in memory.
If you don't let the battery sit dead in the CPU and you stick the replacement battery in after removing the old battery the CPU will remember the settings. Off the top of my head I assume there is probably a capacitor inside the CPU which will keep the settings for much longer than it will take the average person to replace the battery.
 

Flatscan

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Aug 22, 2005
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rule62 said:
For me, HR drop out typically gets fixed by making sure that I have a tight and wet connection with the chest strap. If that doesn't do it, then replacing the battery in my strap usually does it. Last thing I try then is the battery in my CPU.
I used to have problems with HR drop mostly due to worn elastic in the transmitter strap. I bought a cheap new HRM for the transmitter and started using Nashbar Heart Rate Gel, just a dab on each pad. A 4oz bottle is $5-8 from either Nashbar or Performance, and it should last for most of the season.

palewin said:
Basically a "supporting post" for Rule's posting: the #357 batteries are a standard watch battery, and most supermarkets and pharmacy chains which have a "battery center" carry #357s along with the more common AA and AAA batteries. I think all the #357s are silver oxide, but check the packaging.
The 357 is one of the top-5 most common watch batteries, out of 20-30 somewhat common ones. One thing to watch for is that the 675 hearing aid battery is a compatible size, but is zinc-air chemistry. The battery has a small hole covered by a removable sticker, and is activated when air enters through the hole. My Avocet 45tt is marked 675 and can take 357/LR44/etc, but I wouldn't experiment with your PT SL. Write down "357 silver oxide" and take it with you to the store.

Another option is to buy batteries online. The in-store markup is so high that you only need to buy a few to break even on shipping.
 

JohnMeyers

New Member
Aug 12, 2005
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The best way I've found to open the cover is with a US nickel or quarter. I don't have too many screwdrivers that are big enough for that sort of thing.
 

sugaken

New Member
Mar 27, 2006
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cuocciom said:
I haven't had to replace the hub batteries in my PowerTap SL yet, but I imagine I will soon. I've had the powermeter since late December, so probably put 150-200 hours on it.
I've had to replace them after only two months of use. As with most electrical equipment, it doesn't appear that my PT SL came with a set of fresh, unused batteries (or maybe the batteries have been a little emaciated during storage; they weren't insulated when my PT SL arrived).

The owner's manual lists Silver Oxide #357 batteries. I'm not familiar with these, and I haven't seen them in the stores. Any good places to find them?
Not knowing where you live, I can't really comment on the good places to get them, but the #357s are often referred to also as SR44s, so you should also look for them. You could also use the cheaper LR44s, but the LR44 is an alkaline battery which will last shorter than its silver-oxyde counterpart (the SR44 or #357).

Hope this helps,

Ken
 

zaskar

New Member
Aug 3, 2003
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Woofer said:
If you don't let the battery sit dead in the CPU and you stick the replacement battery in after removing the old battery the CPU will remember the settings. Off the top of my head I assume there is probably a capacitor inside the CPU which will keep the settings for much longer than it will take the average person to replace the battery.


Since my hub battery was dieing i decided to replace the cpu battery. i had to reset the date, everything else was saved.