Prescription Lens Sun Specs



A

Anonymous

Guest
I'm sure this subject will have been done to death but bear
with me. I'm interested in peoples experiences of "cycling
eye wear" fitted with prescription lens. Until now I have
been using a pair of tinted "ordinary" specs. Nothing wrong
with what I have but I like the idea of the greater
protection offered by some of the styles available.. I took
a pair Rudy Project Kerosene's borrowed from one of my
daughters along with the clip-in prescription lens holder
into my optician for their opinion on fitting lens with my
prescription into them. My prescription is +3.5 both eyes.
This is within the correction limits Rudy Project state for
the clip in holders. The opticians said they could get the
lens fitted but were a bit doubtful of complete success on
the grounds that the lenses would be very close to my eyes
and there is significant curvature with this type of frame.
They suggested I canvas opinion of other users as they have
had very little experience of what I was trying to do and
none with.Rudy Project..

So there it is.

Any advice/experiences will be greatly appreciated.

TIA

Roger
 
P

Paul

Guest
>" My prescription is +3.5 both eyes. This is within the
>correction limits
Rudy
> Project state for the clip in holders."

Depending on the curvature of lenses selected to go into the
clip I would imagine there might be more of a problem with
the from of the insert rubbing on the back of the sunglass
lens. All it would need is sensible lens selection and the
lenses to be surfaced to suitable centre substance. You
would get a better result with a higher index material than
standard plastic
(CR39) but this would obviously put the cost up a bit.

We don't sell Rudy Project but I have had the chance to have
a good look at their products and they seem very well made
with clever design ideas. Kerosene in particular with it's
flippy front is very smart.

Cheers

Paul F
 
D

David Waters

Guest
Roger wrote:

> I'm sure this subject will have been done to death but
> bear with me. I'm interested in peoples experiences of
> "cycling eye wear" fitted with prescription lens. Until
> now I have been using a pair of tinted "ordinary" specs.
> Nothing wrong with what I have but I like the idea of the
> greater protection offered by some of the styles
> available.. I took a pair Rudy Project Kerosene's borrowed
> from one of my daughters along with the clip-in
> prescription lens holder into my optician for their
> opinion on fitting lens with my prescription into them. My
> prescription is +3.5 both eyes. This is within the
> correction limits Rudy Project state for the clip in
> holders. The opticians said they could get the lens fitted
> but were a bit doubtful of complete success on the grounds
> that the lenses would be very close to my eyes and there
> is significant curvature with this type of frame. They
> suggested I canvas opinion of other users as they have had
> very little experience of what I was trying to do and none
> with.Rudy Project..
>
> So there it is.
>
> Any advice/experiences will be greatly appreciated.
>
> TIA
>
> Roger
>
>

I think you can get prescription lenses put into some of the
oakley sunglasses. (Not sure about the cycling specific
wraps though) I wouldn't like to venture on how much they
might cost though. You must be loooking at at least £200
 
P

Pete Franklin

Guest
news:[email protected]...
> I'm sure this subject will have been done to death but
> bear with me. I'm interested in peoples experiences of
> "cycling eye wear" fitted with prescription lens. Until
> now I have been using a pair of tinted "ordinary"
> specs. Nothing
wrong
> with what I have but I like the idea of the greater
> protection offered by some of the styles available.. I
> took a pair Rudy Project Kerosene's borrowed from one of
> my daughters along with the clip-in prescription lens
> holder into my optician for their opinion on fitting lens
> with my prescription into them. My prescription is +3.5
> both eyes. This is within the correction limits
Rudy
> Project state for the clip in holders. The opticians said
> they could get the lens fitted but were a bit doubtful
of
> complete success on the grounds that the lenses would be
> very close to my eyes and there is significant curvature
> with this type of frame. They suggested I canvas opinion
> of other users as they have had very
little
> experience of what I was trying to do and none with.Rudy
> Project..
>
> So there it is.
>
> Any advice/experiences will be greatly appreciated.
>
I've not used the Rudy Projects but I've had two sets of
Bollés - first Edge IIs and now Vigilantes. Bolle do another
design that also takes prescription lenses called the Parole
- I tried these but the insert ended up too close to my eyes
and my eyelashes got hung up on them! The Vigilantes are
great, come with 3 different sets of coloured lenses and
cost me <£100 all in, including my prescription lenses.
Details are on their website at www.bolle.com - look for
Sport Optical System. I have no connection with Bollé other
than as a satisfied customer.

--
Pete
===
850 Le Mans II, Marin Mount Vision, Onza Muni Remove your
spleen to reply by email.
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Pete Franklin wrote:

> I've not used the Rudy Projects but I've had two sets of
> Boll=E9s - fir=
st Edge
> IIs and now Vigilantes. Bolle do another design that also
> takes prescri=
ption
> lenses called the Parole - I tried these but the insert
> ended up too cl=
ose
> to my eyes and my eyelashes got hung up on them!=20

AFAICT the Parole is basically a slightly smaller version of
the=20 Vigilante for folk with slightly smaller heads. Just
a case of try them =

both and see which works best for you.

> come with 3 different sets of coloured lenses and cost me
> <=A3100 all i=
n,
> including my prescription lenses.

That's very good, mine cost me =A3110 with clear and grey
lens. I=20 subsequently picked up an amber set for another
=A318, so you did better =

than I did on price! (and I've come across higher prices
than I paid).

I recently got the prescription insert reglazed with a new
prescription, =

which has the nice effect of three new prescription lens
sets for the=20 price of 1 because the same insert works for
all of the outer lenses.=20 Because the prescription insert
itself is relatively flat it isn't a=20 Complete Beast to
glaze, which I think is the case with directly=20 prescription-
glazing a wraparound style lens. I've been happy with my=20
Vigilantes. They are slightly less comfy with the insert in,
just from=20 the extra weight, but not to an extent that's
caused me problems.

Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382
660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44
1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
[email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
J

John And Paulin

Guest
I use Bolle Edge with inserts-great .
John.
http://www.pbase.com/john28july

--
No direct reply option available. "Peter Clinch"
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]... Pete Franklin wrote:

> I've not used the Rudy Projects but I've had two sets of
> Bollés - first
Edge
> IIs and now Vigilantes. Bolle do another design that
> also takes
prescription
> lenses called the Parole - I tried these but the insert
> ended up too close to my eyes and my eyelashes got hung up
> on them!

AFAICT the Parole is basically a slightly smaller version of
the Vigilante for folk with slightly smaller heads. Just a
case of try them both and see which works best for you.

> come with 3 different sets of coloured lenses and cost me
> <£100 all in, including my prescription lenses.

That's very good, mine cost me £110 with clear and grey
lens. I subsequently picked up an amber set for another £18,
so you did better than I did on price! (and I've come across
higher prices than I paid).

I recently got the prescription insert reglazed with a new
prescription, which has the nice effect of three new
prescription lens sets for the price of 1 because the same
insert works for all of the outer lenses. Because the
prescription insert itself is relatively flat it isn't a
Complete Beast to glaze, which I think is the case with
directly prescription-glazing a wraparound style lens. I've
been happy with my Vigilantes. They are slightly less comfy
with the insert in, just from the extra weight, but not to
an extent that's caused me problems.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
A

A.Lee

Guest
On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 01:39:14 +0000, Roger wrote: Loads of
snips.
> Rudy Project Kerosene's .... My prescription is +3.5 both
> eyes..... The opticians said they could get the lens
> fitted but were a bit doubtful.... They suggested I canvas
> opinion of other users ....

Yes, I have these glasses, and have used them for Summer
racing for 2 years, they are excellent.They do give a
strange distortion when viewing things close up (mine are
-1.5, and -3.75) - I went to pick up a pen to sign on, and
missed the pen - close up things look further away, but
after a couple of minutes the effect doesnt seem to bother
me.General riding is fine, it is just things at arms length
that look strange for a while. Someone else has mentioned
the same effect with theirs on here as well before. Alan.

--
To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.
http://www.dvatc.co.uk - Off-road cycling in the North
Midlands.
 
D

Doki

Guest
Roger wrote:
> I'm sure this subject will have been done to death but
> bear with me. I'm interested in peoples experiences of
> "cycling eye wear" fitted with prescription lens.

Why not try contact lenses? They're miles ahead of glasses
IMO. The main problem is that you can only keep basic ones
in for 12 hours of so before they start getting dry.
 
N

Nc

Guest
Peter Clinch wrote:
> Pete Franklin wrote:
>
>> I've not used the Rudy Projects but I've had two sets of
>> Bollés - first Edge IIs and now Vigilantes. Bolle do
>> another design that also takes prescription lenses called
>> the Parole - I tried these but the insert ended up too
>> close to my eyes and my eyelashes got hung up on them!
>
> AFAICT the Parole is basically a slightly smaller
> version of the Vigilante for folk with slightly smaller
> heads. Just a case of try them both and see which works
> best for you.

Another vote for the Parole/Vigilante. Works very well,
weight not a problem for many hours of wearing. Also
useful in windy conditions when hill walking and for cross-
country skiing.

Other alternative would be contact lenses and any plain (no
correction) shades.

>> come with 3 different sets of coloured lenses and cost me
>> <£100 all in, including my prescription lenses.
>
> That's very good, mine cost me £110 with clear and grey
> lens. I subsequently picked up an amber set for another
> £18, so you did better than I did on price! (and I've come
> across higher prices than I paid).

Much better price than I got; around £120 for a set of four
colours (clear, pink, brown, half-mirror) and the insert.
Plus about £40 for prescription lens in the insert.

Pink is good for X-country skiing in flat light (*), but
makes greens look very strange, so I don't use it in the UK
for cycling. Brown isn't a lot of use IMHO. Half-mirror is
very good in bright light, being a neutral colour, just
reducing the light. Clear is useful in UK dull conditions to
keep grit/insects/wind from the eyes.

Light yellow might be useful in dull conditions in the UK,
and I might buy a pair.

(* worn most days last week in Norway, even in modest
sunshine. Swapped to half-mirror on the brightest days.
Pink has wierd effects if your colleagues have pink skins,
their skis appear to be riding on pink flourescent lamps;
nearest equivalent would be under-car lights as used by a
Max-Power reader. )

- Nigel

--
NC - Webmaster for http://www.2mm.org.uk/ Replies to
newsgroup postings to the newsgroup please.
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 17:11:09 -0000, "Doki" <[email protected]>
wrote in message <[email protected]>:

>Why not try contact lenses? They're miles ahead of
>glasses IMO.

Unless you have astigmatism and amblyopia in which case you
will see half as well and get thumping headaches.

Moving swiftly on, I find the Rudy Project Kerosenes pretty
good. I have plain, tinted and polarised lenses. Getting the
inserts made up is a job for a proper optician, and I
recommend high-index plastic rather than polycarbonate,
which is rather prone to scratches.

--
Guy
===
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
Washington University
 
D

Doki

Guest
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
> On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 17:11:09 -0000, "Doki"
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> <[email protected]>:
>
>> Why not try contact lenses? They're miles ahead of
>> glasses IMO.
>
> Unless you have astigmatism and amblyopia in which case
> you will see half as well and get thumping headaches.

I suspect the optician would have more idea about this than
me. If you can get used to putting them in and taking them
out, and have no medical problems with them, they're
absolutely fantastic compared to glasses. You can see
properly without having to worry about looking though
glasses, if you see what I mean, there are no problems with
rain, no problems with binoculars etc.
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:48:25 -0000, "Doki" <[email protected]>
wrote in message <[email protected]>:

>I suspect the optician would have more idea about this than
>me. If you can get used to putting them in and taking them
>out, and have no medical problems with them, they're
>absolutely fantastic compared to glasses. You can see
>properly without having to worry about looking though
>glasses, if you see what I mean, there are no problems with
>rain, no problems with binoculars etc.

A significant number of people never get on with them, and
it was the opinion of my optician that corrected vision is
typically better with spectacles. I also like the fact that
my sole working eye is protected by a nice piece of
bulletproof plastic. Frankly I find the "problems" of
wearing specs to be negligible. The only time I've ever felt
the need to try contacts was so I could see the girlies in
circuit classes (where I remove my bins to prevent them
heading floorwards at an inconvenient moment).

--
Guy
===
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
Washington University
 
A

Andymorris

Guest
Roger wrote:
> I'm sure this subject will have been done to death but
> bear with me. I'm interested in peoples experiences of
> "cycling eye wear" fitted with prescription lens.

I wear specs all the time and until recently suffered when
going downhill with streaming eyes and consequent reduced
vision. My glasses were fairly normal ones with trendy small
rectangular lenses.

I've never liked the look of cycling specs as I think they
make you look a twit. Instead I got a pair of aviator type
sunglasses made up with my prescription ( blind as a bat,
long sighted and varifocal) in reactolite type stuff. They
ended up costing a packet (more than oaklys) as I went for
the super thin lenses with coatings, to avoid the blind boy
with milk bottle bottoms look, and varifocal so I can look
at a map, fix a puncture etc.

They do look like something from the 70's, but I find they
work very well, I can go down hill as fast as I like and see
fine, I don't look like an alien when I stop to buy some
fags, the optical feel is the same as my normal glasses and
I can uses them at night or in the sun without faffing about
changing shades. They do steam up at traffic lights, but I
guess that would happen with cycling specs as well. Also if
I break my normal specs I've got a decent spare pair.

--
Andy Morris

AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

Love this:
Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
 
G

Graeme

Guest
"A.Lee" <[email protected]+.com> wrote in news:Z%k5c.23245$Y%6.2258682
@wards.force9.net:

> Someone else has mentioned the same effect with theirs on
> here as well before.
>

I get a very similar effect when I change between my glasses
and my contacts during the day (going either way round).
Everything is still in perfect focus, but my depth
perception seems to have changed somewhat. Maybe it's
because the focussing lens is a centimetre or so away from
the eye for the glasses and on the eye for the contacts?

Graeme
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
NC wrote:

[about lens colours]

I have clear, grey and amber. Grey are standard sunglasses
and I use the clears when it's normal conditions but I
want to see better via the prescription insert. Amber is
quite good high contrast which I mainly use for skiing in
dull conditions and they don't get out too much on the
bike, though if it's one of those bright but not directly
sunny days I'll sometimes use them for that. Without the
skiing I'd probably not have bothered though with the
ambers though.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Doki wrote:

> Why not try contact lenses? They're miles ahead of glasses
> IMO. The main problem is that you can only keep basic ones
> in for 12 hours of so before they start getting dry.

In my particular case my eyes aren't bad enough to bother
with the extra faff: I can survive quite happily without my
prescription lenses, but I do prefer to see as clearly as
possible when mixing it with the traffic.

But if my eyes get worse they'll be high up the
consideration list.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
T

Tim Hall

Guest
On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:28:30 +0000, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 17:11:09 -0000, "Doki"
><[email protected]> wrote in message
><[email protected]>:
>
>>Why not try contact lenses? They're miles ahead of
>>glasses IMO.
>
>Unless you have astigmatism and amblyopia in which case you
>will see half as well and get thumping headaches.

Depends on how serious your astigmatism is. Or how much dosh
you want to lay out. For mild astigmatism (dunno the
numbers) I get acceptable results with vanilla daily
disposables. For more serious astigmatism, toric lenses are
available, for more serious amounts of money.

Dunno what amblyopia is so can't comment.

Tim
 
G

Gwyn Oakley

Guest
In message <[email protected]>
"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:48:25 -0000, "Doki"
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> <[email protected]>:
>
> >I suspect the optician would have more idea about this
> >than me. If you can get used to putting them in and
> >taking them out, and have no medical problems with them,
> >they're absolutely fantastic compared to glasses. You
> >can see properly without having to worry about looking
> >though glasses, if you see what I mean, there are no
> >problems with rain, no problems with binoculars etc.
>
> A significant number of people never get on with them,
> and it was the opinion of my optician that corrected
> vision is typically better with spectacles. I also like
> the fact that my sole working eye is protected by a nice
> piece of bulletproof plastic. Frankly I find the
> "problems" of wearing specs to be negligible. The only
> time I've ever felt the need to try contacts was so I
> could see the girlies in circuit classes (where I remove
> my bins to prevent them heading floorwards at an
> inconvenient moment).

My preference is for contacts when cycling especially in the
rain in the dark. I can wear contacts all day on the bike no
problem, but within 1/2 an hour inside I get dry and
irritated eyes. I also like the improved peripheral vision
and the fact that I dont get the rim of the glasses
interfering with my view - for me this is a particular
problem as AS means restricted back and neck movement.

>

--
Gwyn
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 00:09:28 GMT, Gwyn Oakley <[email protected]>
wrote in message <[email protected]>:

>My preference is for contacts when cycling especially in
>the rain in the dark. I can wear contacts all day on the
>bike no problem, but within 1/2 an hour inside I get dry
>and irritated eyes. I also like the improved peripheral
>vision and the fact that I dont get the rim of the glasses
>interfering with my view - for me this is a particular
>problem as AS means restricted back and neck movement.

I use cycling glasses with prescription inserts on the stick-
bike(s) and my normal bins on the 'bent. Neither gives me
problems with peripheral vision - I buy bins with larger-than-
fashionable frames because I am very sensitive to incursions
into my peripheral vision, what with my funny eyes and all.
I tried contacts riding in the rain and in the dry. In the
dry the wind in my eyes had me reaching for the goggles
straight away, and in the rain I couldn't see diddly because
I spent the whole time blinking away the water (and worrying
about losing the lens). On the whole a pair of bins or
goggles and a peak or visor to keep the worst of the water
out of the upper face works well for me.

--
Guy
===
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after
posting. http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at
Washington University
 

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