Presta valves and the "duh" response

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by John Albergo, May 13, 2003.

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  1. John Albergo

    John Albergo Guest

    How many dumb mistakes does it take to get stranded?

    1 - forget to carry your spare tube 2 - stop to fix a flat, fail to find the object that caused the
    puncture. Assume it must have been that small cut in the cords wearing through the tube. Use up 2
    patches; one for the tube and one for the "cut" tire 3 - in 10 mi stop to fix another flat. Finally
    discover the object that caused (both punctures). Use your last patch. 4 - Even though you have a
    pump with a hose, manage to snap the brass fitting off of the presta valve while carelessly removing
    the chuck.

    You recall that presta valves are held shut simply by the air pressure in the tube. Figure you can
    make it home no problem. Ride a few miles then go for the gusto...

    5 - The tire feels a bit soft. Maybe the valve is leaking a bit after all. Why not pump it up a bit
    more? Put another 15 lbs in the tire. Remove the pump. Witness the following sequence in slo motion
    :00.00 - remove pump head :00.02 - hear a sound like a gunshot :00.04 - flinch :00.09 - marvel at
    how fast the tire is deflating :00.10 - realize your understanding of the presta valve was correct,
    and you lost the valve core into the tube when you pumped, there being no more brass nut to keep it
    from diving. This triggers the "Duh" response; a unique brainwave pattern often accompanied by
    painful facial expressions and pointless ponderings. There are several phases. The timeline in this
    case was typical.

    :00.15 surprise... "s**t!" :03.00 alarm... "S**t!" :10.00 anger... "S##T." :18.00 remorse ... "why
    didn't I pack my spare tube" :35.00 acceptance... "s--t"

    provided as a public service announcement
     
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  2. Ronald

    Ronald Guest

    > How many dumb mistakes does it take to get stranded?

    I had one of those too: -got a flat -ok, let's fit the spare -fitted the spare and tried to inflate
    with CO2 cartridge -s**t, it doesn't inflate, it was punctured by the tools moving around in the
    saddlebag -ok, lets patch one -s**t, the glue has dried out Luckely there was a trainstation nearby
    where i could use some glue (their last drop).

    Lesson learned: check my toolkit once a month or so.

    "John Albergo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > How many dumb mistakes does it take to get stranded?
    >
    > 1 - forget to carry your spare tube 2 - stop to fix a flat, fail to find the object that caused
    > the puncture. Assume it must have been that small cut in the cords wearing through the tube. Use
    > up 2 patches; one for the tube and one for the "cut" tire 3 - in 10 mi stop to fix another flat.
    > Finally discover the object that caused (both punctures). Use your last patch. 4 - Even though you
    > have a pump with a hose, manage to snap the brass fitting off of the presta valve while carelessly
    > removing the chuck.
    >
    > You recall that presta valves are held shut simply by the air pressure in the tube. Figure you can
    > make it home no problem. Ride a few miles then go for the gusto...
    >
    > 5 - The tire feels a bit soft. Maybe the valve is leaking a bit after all. Why not pump it up a
    > bit more? Put another 15 lbs in the tire. Remove the pump. Witness the following sequence in slo
    > motion :00.00 - remove pump head :00.02 - hear a sound like a gunshot :00.04 - flinch :00.09 -
    > marvel at how fast the tire is deflating :00.10 - realize your understanding of the presta valve
    > was correct, and you lost the valve core into the tube when you pumped, there being no more brass
    > nut to keep it from diving. This triggers the "Duh" response; a unique brainwave pattern often
    > accompanied by painful facial expressions and pointless ponderings. There are several phases. The
    > timeline in this case was typical.
    >
    > :00.15 surprise... "s**t!" :03.00 alarm... "S**t!" :10.00 anger... "S##T." :18.00 remorse ... "why
    > didn't I pack my spare tube" :35.00 acceptance... "s--t"
    >
    > provided as a public service announcement
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Ronald wrote:
    >>How many dumb mistakes does it take to get stranded?
    >
    >
    > I had one of those too: -got a flat -ok, let's fit the spare -fitted the spare and tried to
    > inflate with CO2 cartridge -s**t, it doesn't inflate, it was punctured by the tools moving around
    > in the saddlebag -ok, lets patch one -s**t, the glue has dried out Luckely there was a
    > trainstation nearby where i could use some glue (their last drop).
    >
    > Lesson learned: check my toolkit once a month or so.

    And, carry a pack of instant patches just in case... :) (Even though they may not hold for long --
    they'll get you home in a pinch).

    I learned to stay out of bramble patches (mountain biking) -- over 10 holes front and back. Used my
    spare tube and all of my patches and still had to pump-up the tire every 5 or so miles!

    David
     
  4. Ronald

    Ronald Guest

    > And, carry a pack of instant patches just in case... :) (Even though they may not hold for long --
    > they'll get you home in a
    pinch).

    Yes i forgot to mention that, i carry a few of those too now. And a little perfume tester bottle
    with white spirit to clean the inner tube before patching, works much better/cleaner than
    sanding paper.

    "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ronald wrote:
    > >>How many dumb mistakes does it take to get stranded?
    > >
    > >
    > > I had one of those too: -got a flat -ok, let's fit the spare -fitted the spare and tried to
    > > inflate with CO2 cartridge -s**t, it doesn't inflate, it was punctured by the tools moving
    > > around
    in the saddlebag
    > > -ok, lets patch one -s**t, the glue has dried out Luckely there was a trainstation nearby where
    > > i could use some glue
    (their last drop).
    > >
    > > Lesson learned: check my toolkit once a month or so.
    >
    > And, carry a pack of instant patches just in case... :) (Even though they may not hold for long --
    > they'll get you home in a
    pinch).
    >
    > I learned to stay out of bramble patches (mountain biking) -- over 10 holes front and back. Used
    > my spare tube and all of my patches and still had to pump-up the tire every 5 or so miles!
    >
    > David
     
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