Preventing rust on bicycle chain



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Joe Samangitak

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I noticed that every time I leave my bike out in the rain, a film of bright orange rust appears over
the chain (and eventually sprockets), the very next day. Even though I leave it uncovered (by a
tarp), to dry in the open air, the chain will still rust rather quickly. And this is after generous
applications of Pedro's ICE WAX chain lubricating fluid. I don't want to have to re-oil the chain
every single time it rains, so is there an easy, practical way to prevent the rust from occurring?
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Joe Samangitak wrote:
> I noticed that every time I leave my bike out in the rain, a film of bright orange rust appears
> over the chain (and eventually sprockets), the very next day. Even though I leave it uncovered (by
> a tarp), to dry in the open air, the chain will still rust rather quickly. And this is after
> generous applications of Pedro's ICE WAX chain lubricating fluid. I don't want to have to re-oil
> the chain every single time it rains, so is there an easy, practical way to prevent the rust from
> occurring?

Use an oil based lube instead of wax.

~PB
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On 1 Oct 2003 00:19:00 -0700, [email protected] (Joe Samangitak) may have said:

>I noticed that every time I leave my bike out in the rain, a film of bright orange rust appears
>over the chain (and eventually sprockets), the very next day. Even though I leave it uncovered (by
>a tarp), to dry in the open air, the chain will still rust rather quickly. And this is after
>generous applications of Pedro's ICE WAX chain lubricating fluid. I don't want to have to re-oil
>the chain every single time it rains, so is there an easy, practical way to prevent the rust from
>occurring?

Use oil instead of Pedro's Ice Wax, and the problem may be reduced. Don't leave it out in the rain,
and the problem *will* be reduced. (This may not be an option, I realize.) Dry lubes tend to perform
poorly in the area of corrosion prevention in my experience.

For what it's worth, there are people who have reported good results with waxing a chain, but I
have heard more negative than positive reports about Pedro's wax from people in both wet and
dry climates.

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
 
G

Gary Young

Guest
[email protected] (Joe Samangitak) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> I noticed that every time I leave my bike out in the rain, a film of bright orange rust appears
> over the chain (and eventually sprockets), the very next day. Even though I leave it uncovered (by
> a tarp), to dry in the open air, the chain will still rust rather quickly. And this is after
> generous applications of Pedro's ICE WAX chain lubricating fluid. I don't want to have to re-oil
> the chain every single time it rains, so is there an easy, practical way to prevent the rust from
> occurring?

Ice Wax is a water-based lubricant. When I used it (not for long), I'd get rust on my chain even
though I rarely leave my bike outside in the rain.

I agree with those who recommend you switch to a "wet" lube, but if you must use a wax, you might
try one like White Lightning that is carried into the chain by a petroleum-based solvent.
 
B

B A R R Y B U R

Guest
On 1 Oct 2003 00:19:00 -0700, [email protected] (Joe Samangitak) wrote:

> And this is after generous applications of Pedro's ICE WAX chain lubricating fluid.

Ice Wax is full of water, and is water soluble. It may actually cause your chain to rust, as it did
mine. Try an oil based lube if your bike gets wet often.

FWIW, I tossed a 1/4-20 nut into a bottle of Ice Wax as an agitator, and the nut got so rusty it
turned the lube red. <G>

The only place I use Ice Wax is on my Speedplay X pedal cleats.

Barry
 
M

Mike Beauchamp

Guest
I've ONLY ever had cheap chains rust on me. My good bike is also my commuter bike, which I'll leave
outside and it will rain occasionally. I had a cheap chain on there at one point and it rusted
within weeks. The silver chain I had on before never rusted, and the silver chain I have on now
hasn't rusted.

As for lube, I occasionally use Finish Line synthetic. But just from my experiences, it has a lot
more to do with the chain.. I could be wrong though.

Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com

"Joe Samangitak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I noticed that every time I leave my bike out in the rain, a film of bright orange rust appears
> over the chain (and eventually sprockets), the very next day. Even though I leave it uncovered (by
> a tarp), to dry in the open air, the chain will still rust rather quickly. And this is after
> generous applications of Pedro's ICE WAX chain lubricating fluid. I don't want to have to re-oil
> the chain every single time it rains, so is there an easy, practical way to prevent the rust from
> occurring?
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
Mike Beauchamp writes:

> I've ONLY ever had cheap chains rust on me. My good bike is also my commuter bike, which I'll
> leave outside and it will rain occasionally. I had a cheap chain on there at one point and it
> rusted within weeks. The silver chain I had on before never rusted, and the silver chain I have on
> now hasn't rusted.

The way you say that one might get the impression that alloy steels used in more expensive chains
doesn't rust. Unless it is a stainless steel, of which no one makes high performance bicycle chains,
it rusts equally well on links that are not chrome or nickel plated. My SRAM black finish chains
never rust other than on the periphery of the rollers (a yellow tinge) after a rainy ride, but that
wears off the first dozen turns of the wheel.

I think those who are bothered by rust on the chain are either not riding enough or are trying to
keep an immaculate bicycle with no visible lubricant.

Jobst Brandt [email protected]
 
B

Benjamin Lewis

Guest
jobst brandt wrote:

> I think those who are bothered by rust on the chain are either not riding enough or are trying to
> keep an immaculate bicycle with no visible lubricant.

I got lots of rust when I was using "White Lightning" lube (I think it's wax-based). I have had no
problem since I switched to chainsaw-bar oil, and it rains a fair bit here in the Pacific northwest.
I'm still using the same brand of chain.

--
Benjamin Lewis

"Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you
underneath. At night, the ice weasels come." --Matt Groening
 
M

Mike Beauchamp

Guest
I didn't mean to give that impression, as I didn't know if or if not the different metals both
rusted (at least at the same rate). I just figured the nickel coated chains rusted less easily...
but I guess that's wrong.

Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com

<[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Mike Beauchamp writes:
>
> > I've ONLY ever had cheap chains rust on me. My good bike is also my commuter bike, which I'll
> > leave outside and it will rain occasionally. I had a cheap chain on there at one point and it
> > rusted within weeks. The silver chain I had on before never rusted, and the silver chain I have
> > on now hasn't rusted.
>
> The way you say that one might get the impression that alloy steels used in more expensive chains
> doesn't rust. Unless it is a stainless steel, of which no one makes high performance bicycle
> chains, it rusts equally well on links that are not chrome or nickel plated. My SRAM black finish
> chains never rust other than on the periphery of the rollers (a yellow tinge) after a rainy ride,
> but that wears off the first dozen turns of the wheel.
>
> I think those who are bothered by rust on the chain are either not riding enough or are trying to
> keep an immaculate bicycle with no visible lubricant.
>
> Jobst Brandt [email protected]
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Thu, 2 Oct 2003 03:33:19 -0400, "Mike Beauchamp" <[email protected]> may have said:

>I didn't mean to give that impression, as I didn't know if or if not the different metals both
>rusted (at least at the same rate). I just figured the nickel coated chains rusted less easily...
>but I guess that's wrong.

Different alloys will show corrosion at different rates in my experience, but none of the alloys
used in chains seems immune in my experience. I have two bikes with different brands of chain and
identical (oiled) lube regimes which show corrosion in an entirely different manner; one will get
visible orange spots within an hour after parking wet, the other will take until the following
morning...and if the chain dries fast enough, not at all. (The chain that rusts fast is getting a
bit worn now, so it will probably go away soon.)

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
 
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