Price / performance questions

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Scott C, Jun 23, 2003.

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  1. Scott C

    Scott C Guest

    I'm not new to bikes, but am no expert. I ride about 30 miles a weekend (15 miles each day) with my
    girlfriend - and we both enjoy this. We have very old bikes, Specialized mountain-type bikes (1980's
    era). We are thinking of getting new bikes - not sure why, as these seem good - here's my question..
    if we do, will I really notice any difference between a $250 bike and a $400 bike?

    I recall riding my room mates bike in college - he was into this big time, and he had a bike worth
    about $1500... and all I can recall is it felt like it peddled itself. It was almost effortless. It
    was a street bike, small skinny tires, Campo stuff all over. I don't want to spend this much.

    comments?

    Thanks

    sc
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Scott C" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > I'm not new to bikes, but am no expert. I ride about 30 miles a weekend (15 miles each day) with
    > my girlfriend - and we both enjoy this. We have very old bikes, Specialized mountain-type bikes
    > (1980's era). We are thinking of getting new bikes - not sure why, as these seem good - here's my
    > question.. if we do, will I really notice any difference between a $250 bike and a $400 bike?

    If you buy a road bike instead of a mountain bike, you will notice a big difference when riding on
    paved roads.
     
  3. On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 05:20:33 +0000 (UTC), Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If you buy a road bike instead of a mountain bike, you will notice a big difference when riding on
    >paved roads.

    You'll also notice a big difference when going offroad, in a less positive way.

    Jasper
     
  4. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Scott C wrote:
    > I'm not new to bikes, but am no expert. I ride about 30 miles a weekend (15 miles each day) with
    > my girlfriend - and we both enjoy this. We have very old bikes, Specialized mountain-type bikes
    > (1980's era). We are thinking of getting new bikes - not sure why, as these seem good - here's my
    > question.. if we do, will I really notice any difference between a $250 bike and a $400 bike?
    >
    > I recall riding my room mates bike in college - he was into this big time, and he had a bike worth
    > about $1500... and all I can recall is it felt like it peddled itself. It was almost effortless.
    > It was a street bike, small skinny tires, Campo stuff all over. I don't want to spend this much.
    >
    > comments?

    You may or may not. Some $$ goes to lower weight, some $$ goes to better components. You probably
    won't notice lower weight in the type of riding that you do, but you probably will notice better
    components.

    When I buy a new bike, I always ride more expensive bikes also as a comparison. You can do the same
    thing when you go to replace your bikes. Ride lots of bikes at different bike shops. If any of the
    new bikes feel enough better, buy it -- otherwise, stick with what you have
    :). While you're at it, talk to the sales people about the kind of
    riding that you do and what you want. Compare their answers and avoid shops that are more interested
    in selling the latest gadgets or what's on the floor rather than getting you the best bike for you.

    David
     
  5. Ronald

    Ronald Guest

    Tires can also make a lot of difference. If you use offroad tires and switch to some slicks (1.25
    inch or so at 4.5 - 5.0 bar) it will make a lot of difference. For 15 miles a day leisure riding i
    would stick to MTB's with slicks, it will give a much more relaxed ride.

    "Scott C" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm not new to bikes, but am no expert. I ride about 30 miles a weekend
    (15
    > miles each day) with my girlfriend - and we both enjoy this. We have very old bikes, Specialized
    > mountain-type bikes (1980's era). We are thinking
    of
    > getting new bikes - not sure why, as these seem good - here's my
    question..
    > if we do, will I really notice any difference between a $250 bike and a
    $400
    > bike?
    >
    > I recall riding my room mates bike in college - he was into this big time, and he had a bike worth
    > about $1500... and all I can recall is it felt
    like
    > it peddled itself. It was almost effortless. It was a street bike, small skinny tires, Campo stuff
    > all over. I don't want to spend this much.
    >
    > comments?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > sc
     
  6. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    Hi, more questions than answers. First of all, what kind of riding are you doing/going to do? Are
    you planning on buying a different style of bike? Road bike? Or another "mountain-type"? If you are
    going to stay with the same type of bike, then consider putting some money into the old bikes.
    Upgrading the derailluers, shifters, etc. Putting some high quality/performance tires on suitable
    for the riding surface, will make a very real difference. I did this with an older road bike and I
    am totally pleased with the results. Jeff

    "Scott C" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm not new to bikes, but am no expert. I ride about 30 miles a weekend (15 miles each day) with
    > my girlfriend - and we both enjoy this. We have very old bikes, Specialized mountain-type bikes
    > (1980's era). We are thinking of getting new bikes - not sure why, as these seem good - here's my
    > question.. if we do, will I really notice any difference between a $250 bike and a $400 bike?
    >
    > I recall riding my room mates bike in college - he was into this big time, and he had a bike worth
    > about $1500... and all I can recall is it felt like it peddled itself. It was almost effortless.
    > It was a street bike, small skinny tires, Campo stuff all over. I don't want to spend this much.
    >
    > comments?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > sc
     
  7. You'll notice more of a difference in the types of bikes than the price. Since all you do is simple
    leisure rides on road, A mountain bike is too heavy and sluggish for your need.

    You may wish to try a ride more suited to your needs. A light duty tourer or "sport" bike may be
    better. It's a road bike that's designed for the recreational rider, not the racer. The geometry is
    more "relaxed" making it more stable and comfortable.

    These usually run in the price range you mentioned for a decent model. Just stay away from the
    department stores. A god bike shop will not only set you up with what you need, it will fit you to
    it as well. And of course, they no how to assemble and maintain the bike properly.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  8. "Scott C" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm not new to bikes, but am no expert. I ride about 30 miles a weekend
    (15
    > miles each day) with my girlfriend - and we both enjoy this. We have very old bikes, Specialized
    > mountain-type bikes (1980's era). We are thinking
    of
    > getting new bikes - not sure why, as these seem good - here's my
    question..
    > if we do, will I really notice any difference between a $250 bike and a
    $400
    > bike?
    >
    > I recall riding my room mates bike in college - he was into this big time, and he had a bike worth
    > about $1500... and all I can recall is it felt
    like
    > it peddled itself. It was almost effortless. It was a street bike, small skinny tires, Campo stuff
    > all over. I don't want to spend this much.
    >
    > comments?

    Yes, look up "law of diminishing returns." More expensive is better, but the more spend the smaller
    the improvement.
     
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