Pricing used bikes

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by FFBSensei, Apr 26, 2004.

  1. FFBSensei

    FFBSensei Guest

    Hello,

    I used to (past tense) be into biking way WAY back when I was in
    college. In fact, I still have the bike I rode with some of the guys
    on the bike team - a 1985 Specialized Allez.

    Is there a market for a bike that's almost 20 years old? I also have
    a 10 year old Specialized Stumpjumper that cost me $900 way back when.

    I am contemplating entering a triatholon (want to do one of those
    before i turn 40)...and was thinking it might be a good time to buy a
    new bike. I just ran by a high-end bike store...wow, bikes going
    anywhere from $1500 to $5k and higher.

    I contemplated just riding my old Allez, but its a 12-speeds with a
    13-23 ratio in the back...I'd be afraid I'd have a heart attack if I
    had to climb any hills of note. When I was riding in my younger days,
    it didn't bother me to climb hills with the bike...but 3 kids later
    and 20 years later, along with a few inches to my waist...alas, its a
    different story.

    I was looking to sell both of my bikes and then try and cobble some
    money to buy a new bike. With 3 kids under 6, and the need to pay
    mortgage, I don't think I can spend anywhere close to $1,000.

    Should I just look at newer used bicycles? Or is there a bike out
    there for under $1000 that would be suitable. I don't think I'll be
    coming anywhere close to the 120 miles a week I was riding in college,
    and probably more riding with the kids. But I wanted something that
    would be suitable for triathalons?

    Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles? Suggestions
    as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?

    Thanks for the assistance!
     
    Tags:


  2. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    26 Apr 2004 14:15:18 -0700,
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (FFBSensei) wrote, in part:

    >Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles?


    E-bay has pretty much defined the market values for used bikes.
    Here's some WAG for vintage lightweights
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/vrbn-a-f.html

    >But I wanted something that would be suitable for triathalons?
    >
    >Suggestions
    >as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?


    Cervélo Soloist 105 - ~$1700
    --
    zk
     
  3. Dane Jackson

    Dane Jackson Guest

    FFBSensei <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I was looking to sell both of my bikes and then try and cobble some
    > money to buy a new bike. With 3 kids under 6, and the need to pay
    > mortgage, I don't think I can spend anywhere close to $1,000.


    Or take option #3

    I'm assuming you have DT shifters and a steel frame.

    New cassette (12-27) $40
    New (9-speed) rear wheel $80-120
    Cold-set rear triangle (LBS) $15
    Bar-end shifters (9 spd) $50
    or 105 STI levers $160

    So including labor and miscellany, call it $250-400 for a decent upgrade.

    If you want an even wider cassette you might pick up a new long-cage
    (MTB) derailleur for $20-25, and that would allow you to run a 12-34 or
    11-32 cassette.

    --
    Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g
    "How should I know if it works? That's what beta testers are for. I only
    coded it."
    (Attributed to Linus Torvalds, somewhere in a posting)
     
  4. Dave Mayer

    Dave Mayer Guest

    >
    > Should I just look at newer used bicycles? Or is there a bike out
    > there for under $1000 that would be suitable. I don't think I'll be
    > coming anywhere close to the 120 miles a week I was riding in college,
    > and probably more riding with the kids. But I wanted something that
    > would be suitable for triathalons?
    >
    > Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles? Suggestions
    > as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?
    >
    > Thanks for the assistance!


    The best values in bikes are the used ones. Cars are just like bikes: they
    depreciate 30% as soon as they are off the lot, and they are down to half of
    purchase price after a couple of years. Best value: a high-end 80's vintage
    steel frame bike.

    Second tip: if a used bike has STI shifters on it, assume that they are shot
    or will be within a few months. The #1 reason for folks selling road bikes
    is that their shifters are dying.

    STI problems can often be fixed by cleaning out the internals with WD-40.
    If that doesn't work then the problem is probably terminal. Campagnolo
    Ergopower shifters however can be serviced relatively inexpensively.. A lot
    of 10-year old Campy shifters are still on the road, like a pair of mine
    that have been overhauled recently, and are good as new.

    My recommendation: get a high-end older steel bike from someone you trust,
    and then buy and install some STI or Ergopower shifters yourself. This
    approach should bring in a whole bike for about $500.
     
  5. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 15:19:39 -0700, Dane Jackson <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >Or take option #3


    I'll second that!

    >New cassette (12-27) $40
    >New (9-speed) rear wheel $80-120
    >Cold-set rear triangle (LBS) $15


    It may be tough to find a LBS to do this in many areas. I'm not
    sure, never tried, but I doubt any here would, and especially not
    for $15. Sheldon Brown's website makes it sound easy enough to do at
    home anyway.

    >Bar-end shifters (9 spd) $50
    >or 105 STI levers $160


    I'd add a triple crank, BB, and appropriate front derailer (if
    planning to use STI or other indexed shifters):
    Sora triple crank: $60
    BB: $15-20
    Derailer: $17

    >So including labor and miscellany, call it $250-400 for a decent upgrade.


    Maybe as much as $600 with everything above and $100 worth of the
    tools to do it yourself. That's probably a high number; but it's
    probably cheaper than labor either way, and you don't have to beg
    and goad the LBS to install your mail-order parts (or pay 200% for
    the parts, at least around here) when they'd much rather sell you a
    new bike.

    Oh, and $20 or $40 or whatever it costs for a Barnett's manual (or
    download it if that floats your boat). It really is nice.

    Even at $600 (or more for more-expensive components), this comes in
    way under the target $1000 limit, leaving space for other nice stuff
    like new saddle, pedals and shoes, aerobars, etc.

    >If you want an even wider cassette you might pick up a new long-cage
    >(MTB) derailleur for $20-25, and that would allow you to run a 12-34 or
    >11-32 cassette.


    I'd even try the 11-32 on the existing derailer; those older
    derailers often have pretty good capacity...but probably won't
    index, so maybe new rear derailer anyway.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (FFBSensei) wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I used to (past tense) be into biking way WAY back when I was in
    > college. In fact, I still have the bike I rode with some of the guys
    > on the bike team - a 1985 Specialized Allez.
    >
    > Is there a market for a bike that's almost 20 years old? I also have
    > a 10 year old Specialized Stumpjumper that cost me $900 way back when.


    The short answer is that I bought a half-decent rigid Skykomish mountain
    bike with Deore LX components this weekend for C$15 including a BLT
    lighting system (but no charger). Your Stumpjumper is worth a bit more
    than that, because it's a Stumpjumper, but not more than $200 on the
    best possible day.

    As for your Specialized Allez, I offered C$20 for a similar (though
    lower-spec) Ascente of about the same vintage. It was apparently $1100
    new, and the asking price was C$40 (I didn't really need it; I'm grossly
    over my bike-expenses budget this month).

    > I am contemplating entering a triatholon (want to do one of those
    > before i turn 40)...and was thinking it might be a good time to buy a
    > new bike. I just ran by a high-end bike store...wow, bikes going
    > anywhere from $1500 to $5k and higher.
    >
    > I contemplated just riding my old Allez, but its a 12-speeds with a
    > 13-23 ratio in the back...I'd be afraid I'd have a heart attack if I
    > had to climb any hills of note. When I was riding in my younger days,
    > it didn't bother me to climb hills with the bike...but 3 kids later
    > and 20 years later, along with a few inches to my waist...alas, its a
    > different story.


    Hm. Well, if you're seriously training for a triathlon, there probably
    won't be any hills. If you're seriously concerned about a lack of
    ratios, you can probably upgrade to either a wider-ratio 6-speed cluster
    out back, or for a little more money, to more gears and a new shifter,
    or to a triple ring setup on the front.

    > I was looking to sell both of my bikes and then try and cobble some
    > money to buy a new bike. With 3 kids under 6, and the need to pay
    > mortgage, I don't think I can spend anywhere close to $1,000.
    >
    > Should I just look at newer used bicycles? Or is there a bike out
    > there for under $1000 that would be suitable. I don't think I'll be
    > coming anywhere close to the 120 miles a week I was riding in college,
    > and probably more riding with the kids. But I wanted something that
    > would be suitable for triathalons?


    Here's the thing. You could get a new Tiagra-equipped or Sora-equipped
    bike for much less than $1000. Tiagra is perfectly serviceable gear, and
    will build into a very rideable bike. I use a Sora shifter on a racing
    bike, and as much as I wish it were the case, it's not the reason I lose
    races.

    > Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles? Suggestions
    > as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?


    At best your bikes are probably worth a collective US$300-400 to a
    really motivated buyer. Check eBay for selling prices.

    But are you just hoping to do triathlons? I would recommend taking the
    Allez and as the song says, loving the one you're with.

    To turn the Allez into a really serviceable tri-bike, I'll just go and
    grab some components from Nashbar, picked because they are generically
    good at pricing:

    Visiontech Tri Max handlebar, $130 (I'm recommending you use your
    current brake levers for now)
    http://tinyurl.com/27e4a

    Ritchey 9-speed OCR rear wheel, $110
    http://tinyurl.com/36b98

    Shimano 9-speed barcon shifters, $50 (technically, only the 8-speed is
    in stock, but I'm going to assume the 9-speed will soon be available at
    the regular price)
    http://tinyurl.com/32muc

    Shimano 105 11-34 (super-wide ratios!) cassette, $37.00
    http://tinyurl.com/37xrw

    Wipperman 9-speed chain, $23
    http://tinyurl.com/2jvsl

    Nashbar says they'll give me a 10% discount, and prices the package at
    305.77. I think the shipping would be about $15 by ground in the US.

    The upgrades I've specc'd would turn your bike into a fairly competitive
    triathlon-only bike. For a more flexible version, you could use your
    road handlebars and either the barcons or new DT shifters plus an
    aerobar for about the same money and almost no aero disadvantage, but
    then you could remove the aerobar part when you wanted a plain road bike.

    The next step up would be one of two ways: if you wanted to go road
    racing, the next big upgrade would likely be to buy STI shifters. If you
    find after a few months of training on this bike that you're ready to do
    a lot of TTs or triathlons, you could add a goofy aerodynamic front
    wheel with too few spokes, but please don't use this for training (I
    have a moral opposition to low-spoke-count wheels in general, but will
    concede their slight advantages on the front wheel of a time-trial bike):

    Velocity Spartacus Front Road Wheel, $120.
    http://tinyurl.com/ytnzu

    The above is not an endorsement of Nashbar, just a random jumble of
    parts from their catalog. You could do a little better if you shop
    around or buy through eBay or rec.bikes.marketplace. I'd also recommend
    asking for a similar proposal from your local bike shop. This package
    would get you a TT/triathlon bike that would have no signifcant
    disadvantages over buying a new tri-bike for much more money. There is
    some chance you would have front shifting problems with your old rings,
    in which case you might have to spend another $50 on rings. The
    wide-ratio cluster I have specified will give you a 39x34 low gear. If
    there's a hill you can't climb with that, then you can't blame your kids
    or your age for it. On the other end, it would have a 52x11 big gear,
    which is probably way too much, but will ensure you never spin out.
    Contemplate other cluster choices if you will.

    Oh, one other bugbear, but it's a minor one: your frame is steel (I'm
    995 sure of this), and you will have to spread it slightly to 130 mm
    from 126 mm. This is trivial: on my own bike, I just manually spread the
    dropouts each time I insert the wheel. For a tidier job, you cold-set
    (bend) the frame, or get your LBS to do it.

    > Thanks for the assistance!


    You're welcome. If you find an internal-gear hub (3,5, or 7-speed) lying
    around somewhere, you can send it to me as commission.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine/wiredcola/
    President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  7. FFBSensei

    FFBSensei Guest

    Thanks for all of the input.

    I had thought about upgrading my current bike with various components.
    Heck, I don't even have clipless peddles. Altho, a part of me likes
    my cleats and not having to worry about falling down (altho I've done
    that with my bike with cleats!).

    Let me call around and see what I can cobble together. That may be
    the low-cost option. I was looking at the new Allez and their
    cheapest model was $800 and spiraled quickly out of control into the
    thousands.

    This seems like a good avenue to pursue. No need to spend money
    needlessly, and I doubt I'll have the time in the near future (next 5
    years) to get into any serious riding. Nor do I think i would do more
    than a triathalon a year.

    I've got to start jumping into the pool and start training.

    Thx again...I'll call up nashbar and see what they say.

    Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (FFBSensei) wrote:
    >
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I used to (past tense) be into biking way WAY back when I was in
    > > college. In fact, I still have the bike I rode with some of the guys
    > > on the bike team - a 1985 Specialized Allez.
    > >
    > > Is there a market for a bike that's almost 20 years old? I also have
    > > a 10 year old Specialized Stumpjumper that cost me $900 way back when.

    >
    > The short answer is that I bought a half-decent rigid Skykomish mountain
    > bike with Deore LX components this weekend for C$15 including a BLT
    > lighting system (but no charger). Your Stumpjumper is worth a bit more
    > than that, because it's a Stumpjumper, but not more than $200 on the
    > best possible day.
    >
    > As for your Specialized Allez, I offered C$20 for a similar (though
    > lower-spec) Ascente of about the same vintage. It was apparently $1100
    > new, and the asking price was C$40 (I didn't really need it; I'm grossly
    > over my bike-expenses budget this month).
    >
    > > I am contemplating entering a triatholon (want to do one of those
    > > before i turn 40)...and was thinking it might be a good time to buy a
    > > new bike. I just ran by a high-end bike store...wow, bikes going
    > > anywhere from $1500 to $5k and higher.
    > >
    > > I contemplated just riding my old Allez, but its a 12-speeds with a
    > > 13-23 ratio in the back...I'd be afraid I'd have a heart attack if I
    > > had to climb any hills of note. When I was riding in my younger days,
    > > it didn't bother me to climb hills with the bike...but 3 kids later
    > > and 20 years later, along with a few inches to my waist...alas, its a
    > > different story.

    >
    > Hm. Well, if you're seriously training for a triathlon, there probably
    > won't be any hills. If you're seriously concerned about a lack of
    > ratios, you can probably upgrade to either a wider-ratio 6-speed cluster
    > out back, or for a little more money, to more gears and a new shifter,
    > or to a triple ring setup on the front.
    >
    > > I was looking to sell both of my bikes and then try and cobble some
    > > money to buy a new bike. With 3 kids under 6, and the need to pay
    > > mortgage, I don't think I can spend anywhere close to $1,000.
    > >
    > > Should I just look at newer used bicycles? Or is there a bike out
    > > there for under $1000 that would be suitable. I don't think I'll be
    > > coming anywhere close to the 120 miles a week I was riding in college,
    > > and probably more riding with the kids. But I wanted something that
    > > would be suitable for triathalons?

    >
    > Here's the thing. You could get a new Tiagra-equipped or Sora-equipped
    > bike for much less than $1000. Tiagra is perfectly serviceable gear, and
    > will build into a very rideable bike. I use a Sora shifter on a racing
    > bike, and as much as I wish it were the case, it's not the reason I lose
    > races.
    >
    > > Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles? Suggestions
    > > as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?

    >
    > At best your bikes are probably worth a collective US$300-400 to a
    > really motivated buyer. Check eBay for selling prices.
    >
    > But are you just hoping to do triathlons? I would recommend taking the
    > Allez and as the song says, loving the one you're with.
    >
    > To turn the Allez into a really serviceable tri-bike, I'll just go and
    > grab some components from Nashbar, picked because they are generically
    > good at pricing:
    >
    > Visiontech Tri Max handlebar, $130 (I'm recommending you use your
    > current brake levers for now)
    > http://tinyurl.com/27e4a
    >
    > Ritchey 9-speed OCR rear wheel, $110
    > http://tinyurl.com/36b98
    >
    > Shimano 9-speed barcon shifters, $50 (technically, only the 8-speed is
    > in stock, but I'm going to assume the 9-speed will soon be available at
    > the regular price)
    > http://tinyurl.com/32muc
    >
    > Shimano 105 11-34 (super-wide ratios!) cassette, $37.00
    > http://tinyurl.com/37xrw
    >
    > Wipperman 9-speed chain, $23
    > http://tinyurl.com/2jvsl
    >
    > Nashbar says they'll give me a 10% discount, and prices the package at
    > 305.77. I think the shipping would be about $15 by ground in the US.
    >
    > The upgrades I've specc'd would turn your bike into a fairly competitive
    > triathlon-only bike. For a more flexible version, you could use your
    > road handlebars and either the barcons or new DT shifters plus an
    > aerobar for about the same money and almost no aero disadvantage, but
    > then you could remove the aerobar part when you wanted a plain road bike.
    >
    > The next step up would be one of two ways: if you wanted to go road
    > racing, the next big upgrade would likely be to buy STI shifters. If you
    > find after a few months of training on this bike that you're ready to do
    > a lot of TTs or triathlons, you could add a goofy aerodynamic front
    > wheel with too few spokes, but please don't use this for training (I
    > have a moral opposition to low-spoke-count wheels in general, but will
    > concede their slight advantages on the front wheel of a time-trial bike):
    >
    > Velocity Spartacus Front Road Wheel, $120.
    > http://tinyurl.com/ytnzu
    >
    > The above is not an endorsement of Nashbar, just a random jumble of
    > parts from their catalog. You could do a little better if you shop
    > around or buy through eBay or rec.bikes.marketplace. I'd also recommend
    > asking for a similar proposal from your local bike shop. This package
    > would get you a TT/triathlon bike that would have no signifcant
    > disadvantages over buying a new tri-bike for much more money. There is
    > some chance you would have front shifting problems with your old rings,
    > in which case you might have to spend another $50 on rings. The
    > wide-ratio cluster I have specified will give you a 39x34 low gear. If
    > there's a hill you can't climb with that, then you can't blame your kids
    > or your age for it. On the other end, it would have a 52x11 big gear,
    > which is probably way too much, but will ensure you never spin out.
    > Contemplate other cluster choices if you will.
    >
    > Oh, one other bugbear, but it's a minor one: your frame is steel (I'm
    > 995 sure of this), and you will have to spread it slightly to 130 mm
    > from 126 mm. This is trivial: on my own bike, I just manually spread the
    > dropouts each time I insert the wheel. For a tidier job, you cold-set
    > (bend) the frame, or get your LBS to do it.
    >
    > > Thanks for the assistance!

    >
    > You're welcome. If you find an internal-gear hub (3,5, or 7-speed) lying
    > around somewhere, you can send it to me as commission.
     
  8. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Is this a troll or what? You are talking about entering a triathlon
    without using up what miles you can on your old bike. If you are worried
    about killing yourself on a hill climb or only putting in less than 120
    miles a week, who are you trying to kid about entering a triathlon? If you
    are married with 3 kids and supporting a family (=working 40+ per week)
    where do you think you will find the tme to train?
    Reality check.....

    On 26 Apr 2004 14:15:18 -0700, FFBSensei <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I used to (past tense) be into biking way WAY back when I was in
    > college. In fact, I still have the bike I rode with some of the guys
    > on the bike team - a 1985 Specialized Allez.
    >
    > Is there a market for a bike that's almost 20 years old? I also have
    > a 10 year old Specialized Stumpjumper that cost me $900 way back when.
    >
    > I am contemplating entering a triatholon (want to do one of those
    > before i turn 40)...and was thinking it might be a good time to buy a
    > new bike. I just ran by a high-end bike store...wow, bikes going
    > anywhere from $1500 to $5k and higher.
    >
    > I contemplated just riding my old Allez, but its a 12-speeds with a
    > 13-23 ratio in the back...I'd be afraid I'd have a heart attack if I
    > had to climb any hills of note. When I was riding in my younger days,
    > it didn't bother me to climb hills with the bike...but 3 kids later
    > and 20 years later, along with a few inches to my waist...alas, its a
    > different story.
    >
    > I was looking to sell both of my bikes and then try and cobble some
    > money to buy a new bike. With 3 kids under 6, and the need to pay
    > mortgage, I don't think I can spend anywhere close to $1,000.
    >
    > Should I just look at newer used bicycles? Or is there a bike out
    > there for under $1000 that would be suitable. I don't think I'll be
    > coming anywhere close to the 120 miles a week I was riding in college,
    > and probably more riding with the kids. But I wanted something that
    > would be suitable for triathalons?
    >
    > Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles? Suggestions
    > as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?
    >
    > Thanks for the assistance!




    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
  9. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Is this a troll or what? You are talking about entering a triathlon
    > without using up what miles you can on your old bike. If you are worried
    > about killing yourself on a hill climb or only putting in less than 120
    > miles a week, who are you trying to kid about entering a triathlon? If you
    > are married with 3 kids and supporting a family (=working 40+ per week)
    > where do you think you will find the tme to train?
    > Reality check.....


    He's probably not entering an IronMan length triathlon; probably a 1/2,
    or maybe an international distance. They're a *lot* shorter.

    .....

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  10. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 06:35:57 -0700, Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Should I just look at newer used bicycles? Or is there a bike out
    >> there for under $1000 that would be suitable. I don't think I'll be
    >> coming anywhere close to the 120 miles a week I was riding in college,
    >> and probably more riding with the kids. But I wanted something that
    >> would be suitable for triathalons?
    >>
    >> Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles? Suggestions
    >> as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?
    >>
    >> Thanks for the assistance!


    Check out the Trek and Giant bikes. There are hybrids that will run under
    $500, that will allow you to ride a short-course triathalon in the middle
    of the pack. (1-2 mile lake swim; 10k to 10mile run; 15-25mile bike).

    On the 120 miles a week. Pfft. I'm an 'over the hill bodybuilder type' and
    I'm riding 120 miles a week just to stay in shape. That's only 20 miles per
    day, and IMO, under 15-20 miles a day and you're just a 'recreational
    biker'. ;-p

    -B
     
  11. FFBSensei

    FFBSensei Guest

    Bill <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Is this a troll or what? You are talking about entering a triathlon
    > without using up what miles you can on your old bike. If you are worried
    > about killing yourself on a hill climb or only putting in less than 120
    > miles a week, who are you trying to kid about entering a triathlon? If you
    > are married with 3 kids and supporting a family (=working 40+ per week)
    > where do you think you will find the tme to train?
    > Reality check.....
    >
    >


    Did I say I was entering an Ironman? lol, egads man, I'd kill myself.

    I'm going to start off with a sprint triathlon. Nothing major...just
    get some exercise, set some goals for myself. I'm certainly not going
    to train 20 hours a week. I'll be lucky to traing once to twice a
    week, and of course, swimming is my weakest area.

    My wife and I used to live in Honolulu where she'd swim a mile about 3
    times a week. I'd do about half a mile and feel quite content.

    Hey, I'm not trying to break any speed barriers here, or win any
    events. Just a guy approaching middle-age who needs to aspire to
    something where the outcome of even just completing the darn thing is
    enough to motivate me to get back into training.

    I used to run track (the mile) in high school, and ride with some of
    the guys on the bike team in college. I figure the longer I wait to
    train for a triathlon, the harder it will be.

    Thanks for the reality check tho! My wife thinks I'm crazy, I tend to
    be an optimist when I set goals...sometimes they're too
    optimistic...but I prefer to try and push myself and see how far I can
    go, even if its just a tiny little sprint triathlon.
     
  12. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "FFBSensei" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I figure the longer I wait to
    > train for a triathlon, the harder it will be.


    For the body, yes.

    But it's hard to get training time with 3 small kids. Or, maybe a better
    answer is that you need to be sure wife and kids aren't neglected (e.g. some
    training can be done with kids, if the kids like to ride on the back of the
    bike, or are big enough to ride on an old tandem).
     
  13. Bill

    Bill Guest

    On 28 Apr 2004 15:38:13 -0700, FFBSensei <[email protected]> wrote:

    Not to worry. I just rode 70 miles of combined road/dirt/mountains today
    and my wife thinks I am crazy too. She tells me that at 55 I should be
    happy to watch television and relax. Like that is ever going to happen.
    Maybe when I wear out everything on my bike and look at the price of a
    new one and get sticker shock. Until then, stay motivated and go for it.
    I,m trying to get back in my 18 year old shape and it is more work than
    I thought, but the results are worth it.
    Good luck.
    >
    > Did I say I was entering an Ironman? lol, egads man, I'd kill myself.
    >
    > I'm going to start off with a sprint triathlon. Nothing major...just
    > get some exercise, set some goals for myself. I'm certainly not going
    > to train 20 hours a week. I'll be lucky to traing once to twice a
    > week, and of course, swimming is my weakest area.
    >
    > My wife and I used to live in Honolulu where she'd swim a mile about 3
    > times a week. I'd do about half a mile and feel quite content.
    >
    > Hey, I'm not trying to break any speed barriers here, or win any
    > events. Just a guy approaching middle-age who needs to aspire to
    > something where the outcome of even just completing the darn thing is
    > enough to motivate me to get back into training.
    >
    > I used to run track (the mile) in high school, and ride with some of
    > the guys on the bike team in college. I figure the longer I wait to
    > train for a triathlon, the harder it will be.
    >
    > Thanks for the reality check tho! My wife thinks I'm crazy, I tend to
    > be an optimist when I set goals...sometimes they're too
    > optimistic...but I prefer to try and push myself and see how far I can
    > go, even if its just a tiny little sprint triathlon.




    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
  14. Q.

    Q. Guest

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    <snip>
    > Maybe as much as $600 with everything above and $100 worth of the
    > tools to do it yourself. That's probably a high number; but it's
    > probably cheaper than labor either way, and you don't have to beg
    > and goad the LBS to install your mail-order parts (or pay 200% for
    > the parts, at least around here) ...


    You aint kidding, especially around *cough* East Providence *cough* (c;

    > Oh, and $20 or $40 or whatever it costs for a Barnett's manual (or
    > download it if that floats your boat). It really is nice.


    $85 at Amazon.com up to $120 at some places.

    C.Q.C.
     
  15. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 01:55:54 -0400, "Q." <LostVideos-AT-hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    >> and goad the LBS to install your mail-order parts (or pay 200% for
    >> the parts, at least around here) ...

    >
    >You aint kidding, especially around *cough* East Providence *cough* (c;


    Could be worse. In a certain large Warwick store, you pay at least
    as much as in certain East Providence stores, but you also must wait
    a half hour standing at the cash register like a fool with cash in
    one hand and an item to purchase in the other...

    >> Oh, and $20 or $40 or whatever it costs for a Barnett's manual (or
    >> download it if that floats your boat). It really is nice.

    >
    >$85 at Amazon.com up to $120 at some places.


    Wow. No wonder it's so commonly pirated. (Disclaimer: I'm not
    expressing any opinion or judgement of wrong or right, just
    observing a partial cause for the rampant piracy of that book.)
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 01:55:54 -0400, "Q." <LostVideos-AT-hotmail.com>
    > wrote:
    > >> and goad the LBS to install your mail-order parts (or pay 200% for
    > >> the parts, at least around here) ...

    > >
    > >You aint kidding, especially around *cough* East Providence *cough* (c;

    >
    > Could be worse. In a certain large Warwick store, you pay at least
    > as much as in certain East Providence stores, but you also must wait
    > a half hour standing at the cash register like a fool with cash in
    > one hand and an item to purchase in the other...
    >
    > >> Oh, and $20 or $40 or whatever it costs for a Barnett's manual (or
    > >> download it if that floats your boat). It really is nice.

    > >
    > >$85 at Amazon.com up to $120 at some places.

    >
    > Wow. No wonder it's so commonly pirated. (Disclaimer: I'm not
    > expressing any opinion or judgement of wrong or right, just
    > observing a partial cause for the rampant piracy of that book.)


    Well, it's commonly pirated because the current publishers of the book
    have, for some time, regularly put different chapters up on their
    website in PDF form.

    There are about 40 chapters, so it took a while to collect it all, but
    there you go.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine/wiredcola/
    President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  17. FFBSensei

    FFBSensei Guest

    So, I just wanted to post a follow up. I managed to find a vintage
    bike collector who wanted my '85 Specialized Allez, and sold it.

    I also just bought a Trek Hilo 2000 - a tribike with an aluminum
    frame, carbon fiber fork, full Shimano Ultegra, and Mavic cxp wheels.
    I just started training for my triathlon and have targeted August for
    my first one - just going to start out with a sprint triathlon and try
    to work my way up to an international distance one by next year.

    Thanks for all who assisted me and provided feedback!


    [email protected] (FFBSensei) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I used to (past tense) be into biking way WAY back when I was in
    > college. In fact, I still have the bike I rode with some of the guys
    > on the bike team - a 1985 Specialized Allez.
    >
    > Is there a market for a bike that's almost 20 years old? I also have
    > a 10 year old Specialized Stumpjumper that cost me $900 way back when.
    >
    > I am contemplating entering a triatholon (want to do one of those
    > before i turn 40)...and was thinking it might be a good time to buy a
    > new bike. I just ran by a high-end bike store...wow, bikes going
    > anywhere from $1500 to $5k and higher.
    >
    > I contemplated just riding my old Allez, but its a 12-speeds with a
    > 13-23 ratio in the back...I'd be afraid I'd have a heart attack if I
    > had to climb any hills of note. When I was riding in my younger days,
    > it didn't bother me to climb hills with the bike...but 3 kids later
    > and 20 years later, along with a few inches to my waist...alas, its a
    > different story.
    >
    > I was looking to sell both of my bikes and then try and cobble some
    > money to buy a new bike. With 3 kids under 6, and the need to pay
    > mortgage, I don't think I can spend anywhere close to $1,000.
    >
    > Should I just look at newer used bicycles? Or is there a bike out
    > there for under $1000 that would be suitable. I don't think I'll be
    > coming anywhere close to the 120 miles a week I was riding in college,
    > and probably more riding with the kids. But I wanted something that
    > would be suitable for triathalons?
    >
    > Suggestions for places to look to price my used bicycles? Suggestions
    > as to what I might look for in my new bike or newer used bike?
    >
    > Thanks for the assistance!
     
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