prime rib cooking question



K

Krystonia5

Guest
when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she says this is normal and
necessary for it to turn out good.

She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists that
she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later back up
to 450 until done. meanwhile the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.

any ideas?

thanks, Paul
 
J

Jmcquown

Guest
Krystonia5 wrote:
> when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she says this is normal and
> necessary for it to turn out good.
>
> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists
> that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later
> back up to 450 until done. meanwhile the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>
> any ideas?
>
> thanks, Paul

Turn on the overhead vent fan?

I roast standing rib like this all the time, my house isn't filled with smoke when I do it.

Jill
 
B

Bob

Guest
Krystonia5 wrote:
> when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she says this is normal and
> necessary for it to turn out good.
>
> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists
> that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later
> back up to 450 until done.
meanwhile
> the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>
> any ideas?
>
> thanks, Paul

Clean the oven? Turn on the exhaust fan? Cook it outdoors in a grill?
 
B

Bob

Guest
Krystonia5 wrote:

> when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she says this is normal and
> necessary for it to turn out good.
>
> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists
> that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later
> back up to 450 until done. meanwhile the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>
> any ideas?

Low-temperature roast like restaurants do it. Roast at 220F to a center temp of 125 for rare, 130
med-rare, 140 medium. Pull and let rest for 20-30 minutes. Carve.

Start to finish, one temp. It will be more moist, more evenly cooked, more tender and more
flavorful.

Pastorio
 
D

David Hare-Scot

Guest
"Krystonia5" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she
says
> this is normal and necessary for it to turn out good.
>
> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep)
baking
> pan, and insists that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees,
then
> after a while lowers to 350, then later back up to 450 until done.
meanwhile
> the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>
> any ideas?
>
> thanks, Paul

The smoke is mainly from the pan drippings burning or juices and fat spattering on to the inside of
the oven which also burn. As others have suggested you can lower the temperature or if your oven has
the facility, lower the botton element power to cool the tray and if required compensate by raising
the top element power to brown the roast.

David
 
E

Edwin Pawlowski

Guest
Krystonia5 wrote:

> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists
> that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later
> back up to 450 until done. meanwhile the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>
> any ideas?

Try a little deeper pan to contain the splattering. We cook it the same way in the bottom of a
roasting pan, maybe 3" deep. Any splatter from fat stays in the pan for au jus. No smoke in the
house and a very nice bark on the medium rare roast. -- Ed [email protected]
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
 
K

Kenneth

Guest
On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 20:22:25 -0500, Bob <[email protected]> wrote:

>Krystonia5 wrote:
>
>> when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she says this is normal and
>> necessary for it to turn out good.
>>
>> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists
>> that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later
>> back up to 450 until done. meanwhile the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>>
>> any ideas?
>
>Low-temperature roast like restaurants do it. Roast at 220F to a center temp of 125 for rare, 130
>med-rare, 140 medium. Pull and let rest for 20-30 minutes. Carve.
>
>Start to finish, one temp. It will be more moist, more evenly cooked, more tender and more
>flavorful.
>
>Pastorio

And keep some beet juice handy in case some of your guests want "rare", and you only have
"medium." <g>

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
 
P

Peter Aitken

Guest
"Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Krystonia5 wrote:
>
> > when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she
says
> > this is normal and necessary for it to turn out good.
> >
> > She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep)
baking
> > pan, and insists that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees,
then
> > after a while lowers to 350, then later back up to 450 until done.
meanwhile
> > the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
> >
> > any ideas?
>
> Low-temperature roast like restaurants do it. Roast at 220F to a center temp of 125 for rare, 130
> med-rare, 140 medium. Pull and let rest for 20-30 minutes. Carve.
>
> Start to finish, one temp. It will be more moist, more evenly cooked, more tender and more
> flavorful.
>
> Pastorio
>

Bob's on the right track but his technique does not give you the lovely browned crust that is an
essential part of a really good rib roast. My favorite is to brown the roast in a pan on the
stovetop first and then roast at a low temp as he describes.

--
Peter Aitken

Remove the **** from my email address before using.
 
J

Jerry Minasi

Guest
>>
>>Low-temperature roast like restaurants do it. Roast at 220F to a center temp of 125 for rare, 130
>>med-rare, 140 medium. Pull and let rest for 20-30 minutes. Carve.
>>

>>Start to finish, one temp. It will be more moist, more evenly cooked, more tender and more
>>flavorful.
>>
>>Pastorio
>
>And keep some beet juice handy in case some of your guests want "rare", and you only have
>"medium." <g>

Start outside on a extremely hot barby or charcoal grill, browning the roast on all sides. This way,
all the smoke is outside! Then, into the oven set at 225degrees F.(107C). then, as above. to see an
example, go to: www. clubphoto.com. Enter: [email protected] See "Ginger's Roast beef". Jerry
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>"Edwin Pawlowski" writes:
>
>Krystonia5 wrote:
>
>> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists
>> that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later
>> back up to 450 until done. meanwhile the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>>
>> any ideas?
>
>Try a little deeper pan to contain the splattering. We cook it the same way in the bottom of a
>roasting pan, maybe 3" deep. Any splatter from fat stays in the pan for au jus. No smoke in the
>house and a very nice bark on the medium rare roast. -- Ed

Elevate roast with a "V" rack, with about a 1/2" of water in pan - zero smoke - and au jus is
practically made. An added bonus is that pan and rack are much easier to clean.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
A

Alan

Guest
On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 20:22:25 -0500, Bob <[email protected]> wrote:

>Krystonia5 wrote:
>
>> when my wife cooks prime rib, it fills the whole house with smoke. she says this is normal and
>> necessary for it to turn out good.
>>
>> She cooks it in a shallow (sometimes 1/4" deep, sometimes 1 1/2" deep) baking pan, and insists
>> that she can't cover it. She starts at 500 degrees, then after a while lowers to 350, then later
>> back up to 450 until done. meanwhile the whole time it spits fat and the house fills with smoke.
>>
>> any ideas?
>
>Low-temperature roast like restaurants do it. Roast at 220F to a center temp of 125 for rare, 130
>med-rare, 140 medium. Pull and let rest for 20-30 minutes. Carve.
>
>Start to finish, one temp. It will be more moist, more evenly cooked, more tender and more
>flavorful.
>
>Pastorio

I second this!

If you want it browned, you have to do that first, in a skillet, but then the roasting at the low
temp (I do 250 degrees f) is wonderful!

It works and it turns out the best!