Pro Fitting worth it?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kantspel, Oct 27, 2003.

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  1. Kantspel

    Kantspel Guest

    I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The last
    two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse (read:
    free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether I should
    drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.

    I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an average
    of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.

    The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a used
    bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I just
    hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it will be. I
    have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my options are
    going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have to offer.

    My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair percentage
    of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)

    Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to match?
     
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  2. Murray

    Murray Guest

    You must ask yourself several questions... Are you a 50 mile every third weekend "warrior"..? Have
    you ridden other bikes that feel just "freakin unbelievable"?? Do you want to commit to your riding
    and have a lot of fun for several years and thousands of miles of riding?? A fit is a starting
    point.. It will get you where your hands, butt, and feet create close to the "circle" that will
    optimize your riding and the pleasure (spelled lack of pain) you should get from it.. You are
    looking for a mid range price.. My take is you should ride several of your friends' bikes and note
    the frame size and material... My personal preference is Ti or steel.. That is just me.. I like the
    feel of the ride.. I find aluminum jangly to ride.. Others love it!!

    You are looking at the high end of the Moore's suits of bicycles.. You will not get that custom fit
    without a couple of thousand more invested... you get fitted for "free" (sort of!!!!) But... they
    tell me that a Moore's suit can stand up alongside an Armani... just an opinion... A great bike is
    like a great woman.. Takes a long time to find, but when you do...you should likely keep it for a
    long time and take very good care of it!! Murray

    On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 10:32:04 -0600, kantspel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The
    >last two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse (read:
    >free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether I
    >should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.
    >
    >I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    >based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an average
    >of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.
    >
    >The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a used
    >bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I just
    >hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it will be. I
    >have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my options are
    >going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have to offer.
    >
    >My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair percentage
    >of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)
    >
    >Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to match?
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "kantspel" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The
    > last two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse
    > (read: free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether
    > I should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.
    >
    > I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    > based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an
    > average of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.
    >
    > The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    > used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    > just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    > will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    > options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have
    > to offer.
    >
    > My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair percentage
    > of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)
    >
    > Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to match?
    >
    The thing about fittings is that they give you a baseline for what measurements to look for in a
    bike. If you KNOW that you need a 55cm frame and a 12cm stem, you know you can get away with a 56cm
    frame and a 11cm stem, assuming the angles are right.

    If money's tight, maybe you can talk the guys in the shop to do a semi fit.
    ie: look at you and take your measurements and plug into their formulae to get you close. That way
    you know what to look for in a frame before you buy something that's going to be all wrong...

    If you're a good customer and the shop's understanding, maybe it'll work. Don't know till you try.

    Mike
     
  4. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "kantspel" <[email protected]omail.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The
    > last two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse
    > (read: free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether
    > I should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.
    >
    > I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    > based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an
    > average of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.
    >
    > The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    > used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    > just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    > will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    > options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have
    > to offer.
    >
    > My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair percentage
    > of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)
    >
    > Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to match?
    >

    FWIW, my local bike shop did a "Fit Kit" fitting for me a couple of years back, and it only cost
    $25. The fitting includes recommendations for both "comfort" and "performance", and I considered it
    money well spent.

    --
    ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.CycliStats.com CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    kantspel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    > used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    > just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    > will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    > options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have
    > to offer.

    I don't think it really makes sense to get a fitting if you're going to buy a used bike online. A
    good fitting involves more than just telling you what "size" frame you need.

    For example, the proper top tube length will depend on the seat tube angle. If the seat tube angle
    is slack, the seat will have to be further forward, making the "effective" top tube length shorter
    than the actual.

    Unless you get very lucky, you're probably going to have to swap some components anyway. You might
    do better to buy a used bike locally that fits you pretty well. And then pay a LBS to fine tune your
    fit on it.

    Art Harris
     
  6. Kantspel

    Kantspel Guest

    GaryG wrote:
    > "kantspel" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The
    >>last two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse
    >>(read: free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether
    >>I should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.
    >>
    >>I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    >>based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an
    >>average of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.
    >>
    >>The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    >>used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    >>just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    >>will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    >>options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have
    >>to offer.
    >>
    >>My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair percentage
    >>of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)
    >>
    >>Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to match?
    >>
    >
    >
    > FWIW, my local bike shop did a "Fit Kit" fitting for me a couple of years back, and it only cost
    > $25. The fitting includes recommendations for both "comfort" and "performance", and I considered
    > it money well spent.
    >

    I wouldn't bat an eye at $25, but $100 is in flinch territory. I know at least one shop in the area
    will fit as part of a purchase, but since I'll probably be buying used...
     
  7. Kantspel

    Kantspel Guest

    >>The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    >>used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    >>just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    >>will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    >>options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have
    >>to offer.
    >
    >
    > A good fitting involves more than just telling you what "size" frame you need.
    >
    > For example, the proper top tube length will depend on the seat tube angle. If the seat tube angle
    > is slack, the seat will have to be further forward, making the "effective" top tube length shorter
    > than the actual.
    >

    One of the reasons I am leaning twords a fitting is precicly for this information. With it I should
    be able to look at the numbers and get some idea of what the bike will feel like. Certianly not as
    good as riding first, but much better than just buying the right "size".
     
  8. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "kantspel" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > GaryG wrote:
    > > "kantspel" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The
    > >>last two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse
    > >>(read: free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure
    > >>wether I should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.
    > >>
    > >>I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    > >>based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an
    > >>average of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.
    > >>
    > >>The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    > >>used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    > >>just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    > >>will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    > >>options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods
    > >>have to offer.
    > >>
    > >>My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair
    > >>percentage of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)
    > >>
    > >>Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to
    > >>match?
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > > FWIW, my local bike shop did a "Fit Kit" fitting for me a couple of years back, and it only cost
    > > $25. The fitting includes recommendations for both "comfort" and "performance", and I considered
    > > it money well spent.
    > >
    >
    > I wouldn't bat an eye at $25, but $100 is in flinch territory. I know at least one shop in the
    > area will fit as part of a purchase, but since I'll probably be buying used...

    I dunno, it sounds totally fair and completely worth it to me. Fit is everything. If you don't
    instinctively know what will work for you, it's well worth paying $100 for that kind of guidance --
    even if you're buying a $300 used bike. Swapping parts can get very expensive, very quickly.

    Matt O.
     
  9. If it were me ... I'd go to http://www.bsn.com/Cycling/ergobike.html and do the measurements on
    yourself and do my own "fit kit". They give you the results of several fitting methods. My
    measurements are recommended from 56 cm (most) to 62 cm. Modern recommendations are for much smaller
    frames than in the old days. This is not a precise science, so an expensive fit from one cyclery may
    be different than and equally expensive fit from another LBS. Like somebody said, if the top tube is
    a little shorter than you prefer then buy a longer stem and sell the one that came with the bike.

    I find a huge ... well ... big ... difference in the position my butt ends up on various saddles.
    Even if they all say Flite on the side. When your ass moves an inch depending on saddle then 5
    millimeters in stem or top tube length isn't going to matter much.

    Charles

    kantspel wrote:

    > I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The
    > last two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse
    > (read: free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether
    > I should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.
    >
    > I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    > based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an
    > average of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.
    >
    > The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    > used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    > just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    > will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    > options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have
    > to offer.
    >
    > My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair percentage
    > of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)
    >
    > Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to match?

    --
    Catamaran racing is like being a kid: Wide Eyes, Big Smile, Wet Bottom
     
  10. D.P.G.

    D.P.G. Guest

  11. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "D.P.G." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s02>...
    > Here I just saved you $100.00 this is the same thing a LBS will do.
    >
    > http://www.wrenchscience.com/WS1/Secure/Fitting/Height.asp

    Dear D.P.G.,

    Thanks for another fascinating web site to add to my swollen favorites.

    I like the way that you added the two decimal places to the savings, just as the site asks for my
    height in inches to two decimal places.

    Most people vary in height daily, losing up to an inch as the cartilage in their spines compresses
    under load and re-expands overnight, so I may not be fussy enough to get a perfect fit, but it still
    looks like a helpful place to get ideas.

    Carl Fogel

    6' 0.14" at 10:03:07 p.m. MST on DST, but taller tomorrow morning
     
  12. prefer-<< I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro
    fitting. >><BR><BR>

    A good fit session is in the hands and skill of the fit person. Like a tailor, there are good ones
    and not so good ones.

    prefer<< This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether I
    should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself. >><BR><BR>

    You cannot really fit yourself like a fit person, looking at you on a fit cycle, can do. Formulas
    are good starting places but are NOT a complete fit.

    prefer<< It would seem reasonable assume that an average of the advice from various sites would be a
    fair approximation of a good fit. >><BR><BR>

    Except a golod fit person will design the fit on you and your riding needs...why a formula is
    NOT complete.

    prefer<< Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to
    match? >><BR><BR>

    Proper fit is the MOST IMPORTANT thing in bicycles....

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  13. Kantspel

    Kantspel Guest

    Well, thanks for the help guys. I'm still on the fence for now but leaning twords doing my own
    fitting. All those fitting sites should give a good approximation for what will work. If I still
    have problems with my new ride I'll probably see what a shop can do but I just don't see $100 of
    value in it for me.
     
  14. Ted B

    Ted B New Member

    Joined:
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    Amen, and that is exactly what I did. So long as you take very accurate measurements, the information generated in return is amazing. If you print out all the returned information and read it very carefully, you will not only have a very solid idea of what you need, but more importantly, you will understand the rationale and kinesiology as to how and why these measurements are calculated, and how they are interrelated. A means of metric measurement is required (if you are with the rest of us in the ass backward U.S.), and a goniometer to measure joint angles can be helpful as well (dirt cheap on Ebay).

    Since using the ergobike website, I've improved both my fit and my cycling performance.
     
  15. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    kantspel wrote:

    > I'm going to be picking up a new road bike soon and am contemplating getting a pro fitting. The
    > last two road bikes I've had did not fit all that well but were deals that I couldn't refuse
    > (read: free). This time out I'm determined to get something that fits well but I'm not sure wether
    > I should drop the cash for a pro fit or use just do a bit of research and fit myself.
    >
    > I've cruised a bunch of web sites that seem well thought out and will recommend a size/position
    > based on measurements you feed into their formulas. It would seem reasonable assume that an
    > average of the advice from various sites would be a fair approximation of a good fit.
    >
    > The main reason that I'm qustioning getting a proper fitting is that I will likely be buying a
    > used bike (probably online). That means I probably won't be able to pick an exact bike anyway, I
    > just hope to be able to read the numbers on a frame to get an idea of how close of a match it
    > will be. I have plenty of time to wait for a ride that is close to what I'm looking for, but my
    > options are going to be somewhat limited as I will be a the mercy of what the used bike gods have
    > to offer.
    >
    > My budget for this bike is going to be under $1k US so the price of a fitting is a fair percentage
    > of my available funds. Fittings look to run about $100 around here (Madison, WI)
    >
    > Any advice/opinions? Are fittings *that* valuable if know you can't pick up a custom rig to match?
    >
    $100 seems like alot of money for that. A comparably priced Italian suit comes with a free fittimg
    and that is arguably the more complex operation.

    Everyone has an opinion . Here's mine: http://www.yellowjersey.org/fit.html

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  16. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

  17. Kantspel

    Kantspel Guest

    Carl Fogel wrote:
    > A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > [snip bike fitting--snip some more--there, this fits]
    >
    >
    >>Everyone has an opinion . Here's mine: http://www.yellowjersey.org/fit.html
    >
    >
    > Dear Andrew,
    >
    > Awfully nice page! Wish your shop was closer.
    >
    > Carl Fogel
    you sure do, it's a great little place.
     
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